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Old 12-19-2020, 09:59 AM
 
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When Puerto Rico was a Spanish colony, it was a major coffee producer. Now production has dwindled to a very small amount. What are some good Puerto Rican coffee brands?
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Old 12-19-2020, 09:01 PM
 
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Wink sasie123

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
When Puerto Rico was a Spanish colony, it was a major coffee producer. Now production has dwindled to a very small amount. What are some good Puerto Rican coffee brands?
BUSTELO......they also produce the largest most beautiful Avocados, I have ever eaten.
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Old 12-19-2020, 09:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
BUSTELO......they also produce the largest most beautiful Avocados, I have ever eaten.
I was talking about coffee grown in Puerto Rico. I found a brand.
https://www.amazon.com/ALTO-GRANDE-C.../dp/B00357LUWC
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Old 12-20-2020, 09:01 PM
 
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Bustelo? LMAO! please. The dollar store here sold that for a while and we have to give it away from free. The best Puerto Rico brands are Yaucono, Cafe Crema and Cafe Rico. I grew up with Yaucono. I bought a lot of Yaucono and pan sobao at the panaderias for years in the island. Coffee and hot fresh bread just made was just a given every morning and a copy of the local newspaper was the thing back in the day for many people in the island.


By the way, Bustelo is a Cuban style coffee that was made famous in New York City with immigrants since it was hard to get the leading brands from Puerto Rico in New York at reasonable prices. I don't put it in the same level as the top 3 in Puerto Rico. I think Colombian is still the best outside of Puerto Rico that we drink here.

Quote:
When Puerto Rico was a Spanish colony, it was a major coffee producer.
and it had extreme poverty and a illiteracy rate at 90%. The 10% who owned the fields were making a killing until the Americans came in. Like I said, unless people today want to be a manager or engineer or a lab tech at the coffee plants, they don't want to work in the fields. You have a lot of 3rd world countries working their fields for cheap labor, so the coffee business in P.R. has gone down in the past 50 years. Plus, you have tough competition in this global market from Seattle and other makers and places that make good coffee at competitive prices.
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Old 12-21-2020, 01:56 AM
Status: "177th Anniversary of Freedom!" (set 3 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
and it had extreme poverty and a illiteracy rate at 90%. The 10% who owned the fields were making a killing until the Americans came in. Like I said, unless people today want to be a manager or engineer or a lab tech at the coffee plants, they don't want to work in the fields. You have a lot of 3rd world countries working their fields for cheap labor, so the coffee business in P.R. has gone down in the past 50 years. Plus, you have tough competition in this global market from Seattle and other makers and places that make good coffee at competitive prices.
That's nonsense though.


For one thing, you are inventing percentages out of thin air. There is no need to lie.


Secondly, can you name a single place in the world that didn't have "extreme poverty and an illiteracy rate at 90%" at that time? Don't worry, I'll be patient and wait. lol

New York City itself was filled with slums with pigs roaming the streets and unpaved roads in Manhattan itself. Why would anyone thing the US would offer any other place a different experience?


Thirdly, the US arrived in PR in 1898 and still by the 1940's PR was basically how it was during the 400 years of Spanish rule. The change of PR started precisely in that decade thanks to the efforts of Luis Muñoz Marín who always advocated for what he considered the best for Puerto Ricans and "extreme poverty" was still a reality to many Puerto Ricans up to the 1970's.

Are the Canary Islands or anywhere in Spain currently experiencing "extreme poverty and a illiteracy rate at 90%?" That's another answer for which I'll wait.

Then comes the million dollar question, would PR be similar to the Canary Islands (which is wealthier) if it would had stay with Spain? I'll wait for that answer too.


The notion that cheap labor is used elsewhere for the coffee industry and that is the main reason PR's coffee industry is not where it should be appears to be higwash too. Some of the biggest and most successful coffee companies in the world are American, from the northern part of the US to boot where the climate in general is colder. Some of the world's most successful coffee houses (Starbucks anyone?) are American too. It seems the lack of "cheap labor" in the USA wasn't an impediment for their global leadership. Why is Starbucks from Seattle instead of San Juan? Someone already mention Bustelo in this thread and while it isn't a true Puerto Rican coffee, it is an American one created and commercialized by a Cuban-American family (in reality the founder was a Spaniard that migrated to Cuba and then migrated again to the USA and founded in The Bronx the famous Bustelo) and targetting the Latino community. The lack of cheap labor in the US wasn't an impediment for its success either. Why is Butelo a New York City company instead of a San Juan, PR company?


Stop making excuses for things that don't have excuses. San Juan should be a powerhouse of coffee companies in Latin America (and in other sectors) and yet it isn't. If Seattle and New York City managed to become coffee powerhouses despite not having a climate appropriate for growing coffee beans and despite "cheap labor" elsewhere, then why exactly is San Juan not a regional coffee powerhouse? I'll wait for that answer too.
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Old 12-21-2020, 02:50 AM
 
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I have been roasting my own beans for 20 years and cannot say I ever recall Puerto Rico beans being for sale from my premium wholesaler. Could be a situation like India, which does grow some premium beans that never seem to make it outside the country of India. In 20 years I got a hold of some real good ones from my wholesaler. A one time thing. I suspect though that PR beans are mostly grown by the likes of MJB/Maxwell House, etc and rarely make it out on their own, for that reason. New Guinea used to be like that, growing for big chains, but times are changing and now a few in PNG are growing very good beans to be sold green to some quality wholesalers.
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Old 12-21-2020, 05:46 AM
 
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1) I was born and raised in the real Puerto Rico, unlike you. I know the history well. The first public University in Puerto Rico (the biggest one) was put and paid for by the United States not Spain. To present, the education system in Puerto Rico is operating and open due to Uncle Sam's American dollars, without that, the system would collapse among other things in the island. The United States put Puerto Rico on the map not Spain. My sources are historians that wrote very intensive history of Puerto Rico like Karl Wageheim, Olga Jimenez, Arturo Morales Carrion and others that took years to investigate and write history books of Puerto Rico (Which I read in school in Puerto Rico and I own). The number is between 80% to 90% by 1897. Either way you cut it, that's 3 out 4 people (min) in P.R. were illiterate when the U.S. took over Spanish rule. There is a difference between poverty under American rule and extreme poverty under Spanish rule. So the nonsense here is your sensitivity of history. If you are going to pretend to talk about Puerto Rico at least learn the history.

2) Puerto Rico's economy under Spain were Sugar and Coffee. It was one of the poorest nation in the Caribbean. You didn't need education to work in the fields since a small % of elites control the colony and Spain made damn sure to keep the masses uneducated. That's how they could control rebellions and keep it as a colony. That's the reason Puerto Rico under the American Flag pushed for Operation Bootstrap from agriculture to industrial and developed economy. That's a huge part why Puerto Rico isn't a power house in coffee today. You have to know history and economy, which you lack off. I'm trying but you have to stop being sensitive like it's an insult to you that Puerto Rico is not the center of the universe.

3) You showed me why you are an independentista living in the states in a bubble that knows nothing about business or reality. There is a saying in Puerto Rico that goes " te crees que Puerto Rico es el ombligo del mundo". Puerto Rico is not the only place that has the weather or the only one that makes good coffee beans and has ports. You have Colombia, Brazil, Honduras, Peru and other Latin places. Then you have the non-Latin countries like Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Philippines and others that produces coffee at a higher and cheaper rate than Puerto Rico would. They have more fields and cheap labor and their countries are not bound to American federal laws about wages and environmental laws and high wages like Puerto Rico which puts them in a huge advantage.

4) When you write silly things like "Puerto Rico should be a powerhouse in coffee" it makes me laugh and it shows you know nothing about coffee, economy or supply or demand or reality about Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is only an island of 130 x 35 miles that made their bed in the '40's when they pushed Operation Bootstrap and are bound by U.S. law and many things. If you are going to pray for rain, you have to deal with the mud . They can't go back and why? Puerto Rico makes good coffee for domestic use. I grew up with Puerto Rican coffee but to compete with Colombia, Brazil and other Latin countries and Southeast Asia in the global market and become a powerhouse? NO! LMAO! But like the Blondie song goes: "Dreaming is free"

5) Seattle is regarded as the world center for coffee roasting and supply chain management. They have one of the biggest ports in the U.S. It's a culture up there and they know their coffee. They have a coffee house in every corner. Not only that but their economy overall is way superior than Puerto Rico. So that answers your questions in why not?. There is another saying in Puerto Rico " tu no te reconoces". It means you should know your limits, stay in your lane and not say silly things. You make it sound like Puerto Rico has the secret recipe to make good coffee beans and the perfect weather that no other place has and the smartest people in production, marketing and business. Powerhouse? deja el crack pana! LOL

6) I grew up and love Yaucono coffee and if I can get it at a good price I will buy it for the memories and tradition in my time in Puerto Rico but there are other beans as good and even better like the Colombians and others in my opinion. The OP poster asked " What are some good Puerto Rican coffee brands?" and somebody named Bustelo which is not a Puerto Rican coffee. The Dollar Store sells Bustelo here in the Midwest and they hardly sell it, that's how cheap it is and low grade coffee. You get what you pay for. The 3 famous coffee brands in Puerto Rico are Yaucono, Cafe Crema and Cafe Rico. I grew up with Yaucono but compared to the rest, it doesn't make top 10. There are better. Only if you are a biased Puerto Rican and think Puerto Rico does it better. LOL

The biggest laugh for last, you wrote:
Quote:
the US arrived in PR in 1898 and still by the 1940's PR was basically how it was during the 400 years of Spanish rule. The change of PR started precisely in that decade thanks to the efforts of Luis Muñoz Marín who always advocated for what he considered the best for Puerto Ricans and "extreme poverty" was still a reality to many Puerto Ricans up to the 1970's.
LMAO! Puerto Rico wasn't the same in 1898 to 1940's. You know nothing about P.R. If it was, your grandparents would have demanded independence. Yeah, Puerto Rico changed because LMM cared for Puerto Rico. That's it! Simplistic explanation to a 500 year problem, it took 1 politician to care. LMAO! It was the U.S. and the American private sector that gave LMM the tools and money to govern and change the economy from agriculture to industrial. It's the reason LMM didn't want to give up on the Golden Goose with eggs and changed from Independence to pro American territory. He sure loved American funds and American dollar but make no mistake about it, It was the U.S. not LMM. LMM wouldn't have lasted 1 term without the protection of the U.S. Albizu and many nationalists tried to kill LMM many times. Who do you think protected LMM and from P.R. turning into a civil war mess like the rest of the Latin countries, take a guess?

Last edited by SanJuanStar; 12-21-2020 at 05:55 AM..
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Old 12-21-2020, 08:53 AM
 
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I read a New York Times article from the mid 2000s about efforts to grow PR’s coffee industry.
https://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/24/u...e-society.html
If the link is behind a paywall for you, the essence of the article is that people think the business can grow if they can find laborers to pick the coffee.
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Old 12-21-2020, 12:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
I read a New York Times article from the mid 2000s about efforts to grow PR’s coffee industry.
https://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/24/u...e-society.html
If the link is behind a paywall for you, the essence of the article is that people think the business can grow if they can find laborers to pick the coffee.

At least you do your background unlike Antonio. I lived there and people don't want to work in the fields for cheap labor when the government pays more to do nothing and they have better job opportunities in the island or flying to any of the 50 states. Add that for an employer to open business in P.R. you have to pay high taxes including payroll tax (American Social Security,Medicare, Unemployment insurance taxes) and obey American labor and environmental laws. Add the local labor laws that the Puerto Rican government puts like mandatory X-MAS bonuses and mandatory paid vacation. Puerto Rico is a small island of 130 x 135 miles, overpopulated. Meaning they don't have the lands for agriculture like many Latin countries. That puts them in a huge disadvantage in the global coffee market with the big boys.




by federal law, Puerto Rico has to pay a worker min. to start $7.25 an hour with a lot of American safety nets while Colombia pays $ 3.72 an hour. Costa Rica $4.08. Dominican Republic 82 cents, Cuba 74 cents. Ecuador $4. Guatemala $2.69. Honduras $2.16. Nicaragua $2.16, Panama $2.59, Peru 2.57, Brazil $2.82. That's just next door to Puerto Rico. Then you have Southeast Asia like Vietnam, Thailand , Laos, Philippines that also have the land, weather and can work for cheap labor. Those wages are for the cities in those countries. We know in the rural areas they get away with paying less because they don't have the labor enforcement like in the U.S. and Antonio dreams Puerto Rico can overcome all of that and be a coffee powerhouse????? LMAO! He reminds me like some Puerto Ricans always think that Miss Puerto Rico is always the best one in the Miss Universe contests. Bias to the core. Puerto Rico is the only place they can grow and market the best coffee beans in the world. The rest of the world are second.



Antonio is your typical independentista living in the states. Loves independence for Puerto Rico and likes to live like in the 19th century but refuses to move to the island and work the coffee fields for cheap labor himself. He wants others to sacrifice for the cause. I met many of them in the island. They get their degree thanks to American Pell Grants, talks independence and the fields but they refuse themselves to sacrifice for the cause. They want others to do it because they love the American dollar and they might talk like socialists but they live like capitalists.



I grew up with Yaucono in the island but I have traveled around the world to know others make as good and better coffee beans than Puerto Rico. Colombians are better and I have gone to Seattle and they know about coffee and how to roast it. It's a culture up there. They design and make all kinds of high tech machines to make all styles of coffee. It's an art form up there. It's like talking soccer with Brazilians. They know their stuff.
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Old 12-21-2020, 12:20 PM
 
462 posts, read 141,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
At least you do your background unlike Antonio. I lived there and people don't want to work in the fields for cheap labor when the government pays more to do nothing and they have better job opportunities in the island or flying to any of the 50 states. Add that for an employer to open business in P.R. you have to pay high taxes including payroll tax (American Social Security,Medicare, Unemployment insurance taxes) and obey American labor and environmental laws. Add the local labor laws that the Puerto Rican government puts like mandatory X-MAS bonuses and mandatory paid vacation. Puerto Rico is a small island of 130 x 135 miles, overpopulated. Meaning they don't have the lands for agriculture like many Latin countries. That puts them in a huge disadvantage in the global coffee market with the big boys.




by federal law, Puerto Rico has to pay a worker min. to start $7.25 an hour with a lot of American safety nets while Colombia pays $ 3.72 an hour. Costa Rica $4.08. Dominican Republic 82 cents, Cuba 74 cents. Ecuador $4. Guatemala $2.69. Honduras $2.16. Nicaragua $2.16, Panama $2.59, Peru 2.57, Brazil $2.82. That's just next door to Puerto Rico. Then you have Southeast Asia like Vietnam, Thailand , Laos, Philippines that also have the land, weather and can work for cheap labor. Those wages are for the cities in those countries. We know in the rural areas they get away with paying less because they don't have the labor enforcement like in the U.S. and Antonio dreams Puerto Rico can overcome all of that and be a coffee powerhouse????? LMAO! He reminds me like some Puerto Ricans always think that Miss Puerto Rico is always the best one in the Miss Universe contests. Bias to the core. Puerto Rico is the only place they can grow and market the best coffee beans in the world. The rest of the world are second.



Antonio is your typical independentista living in the states. Loves independence for Puerto Rico and likes to live like in the 19th century but refuses to move to the island and work the coffee fields for cheap labor himself. He wants others to sacrifice for the cause. I met many of them in the island. They get their degree thanks to American Pell Grants, talks independence and the fields but they refuse themselves to sacrifice for the cause. They want others to do it because they love the American dollar and they might talk like socialists but they live like capitalists.



I grew up with Yaucono in the island but I have traveled around the world to know others make as good and better coffee beans than Puerto Rico. Colombians are better and I have gone to Seattle and they know about coffee and how to roast it. It's a culture up there. They design and make all kinds of machines to make all styles of coffee. It's an art form up there. It's like talking soccer with Brazilians. They know their stuff.
Is Yaucono made from Puerto Rican beans? Is it pure arabica or does it have robusta in the mix?
As for Seattle, I think Starbucks hurt the city’s reputation for good coffee, mainly by burning their beans.
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