U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
 [Register]
U.S. Territories Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, etc.
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-14-2021, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Philly
10,067 posts, read 14,895,104 times
Reputation: 2804

Advertisements

Quote:
The three officers, state policeman Luis Marrero Diaz, and municipal police, Luis Salaman Conde and Eliezer Hernandez Cartagena, were shot Monday afternoon as they chased a group of men in a stolen car near the island’s capital. All three died from their wounds.

The empty automobile involved in the chase was later found at the Luis Llorens Torres apartment complex in San Juan’s Santurce neighborhood.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...?sref=0Ob22b3A
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-16-2021, 12:51 PM
 
429 posts, read 102,112 times
Reputation: 300
Good old LLT caserio (Rican ghetto) . Some things never change. When I was growing up in the island, my mother had a high school friend that lived in Lloren (R.I.P.) and she visited her on Saturdays when she was really sick to help her clean the place and cook. None of my older brothers and sisters wanted to go with her and they split early Saturday and since I was the youngest, my mother took me to help her because she didn't want to go alone. She gave me $20 at the end of the day which back in the mid 80's was a lot of money to me. I made those $20 last. I was tight with the little money I could get back then. I made the eagle on the quarter coin scream, I held it tight. Some people back then put a quarter on their ears waiting for the bus at the stop and I thought it was cool as a kid but my ears were too small at the time and the quarter fell off all the time. I put it deep in the pocket. I didn't want to lose it or give a thief ideas to take it off and yank off my ear for a quarter (that's another story)

But driving in the viper's nest even during the day was tense. She always gave me the rules in what not to do in there and never stare at people on the corners and never go outside and stay inside. It was like you were walking into another dimension when you crossed the imaginary line and everybody on the outside got a little tense when they went it . I remember it had "bodegas" (small liquor stores that sell basic food needs but mostly liquor) it was highly gated with iron bars and big chains and locks for the gate doors with bullet holes around the building. It look like a storage building outside of the the max penitentiaries. That was my first encounter as a kid to an actual crime zone and and real poverty. First time I saw bullet holes everywhere in my life. My mother always had a rule to get in the car and leave by 5 PM. She didn't want to be stuck there in the dark. Roll the windows up and lock the doors in the car.

Now I go back and drive around and just start laughing. Everybody has a satellite dish popping out their balconies, you can see big flat screen tv's in the living rooms from the outside (you see it from the balconies and windows, I guess curtains and shades haven't made their list yet). New fridges and stoves provided by the government and even the cars parked in the parking lots are nice for low income. Most are base entry cars but modern. You see a few high end cars with the funny rims but those I'm assuming are the dealers. They are the only people in the world that take a nice high end German car and puts ghetto rims on it with the spinners or a big aftermarket spoiler on a nice luxury car. Most walk around with smart phones that the government pays. The real poor people in Africa or Haiti look at the "poor" Puerto Ricans in Lloren and say "those people have it good"



Back then, they used to dry their clothes on the balconies real ghetto stuff. As a kid I saw big panties and braws and big Mens underwear with stains and holes hanging dry on the balconies for the world to see while walking to my mom's friend building but since now they are provided by the government with washer/dryer combo you hardly see it. My mother used to stare at me and tell me "don't you laugh" while walking pass it when she saw me starting to grin. She knows that teenagers have a thing in Puerto Rico call "la pavera", that once you start laughing you can't stop, it's a teenage thing. Most of my teenage friends and myself had it. You start laughing and can't stop and the grown ups will smack you if you don't stop. So don't be next to them too long when you get it. I saw huge panties and underwear drying on the balconies and the wind made it look like a flag on the pole and that was very funny thing as a kid to me. My mother was old school and she grew up in washing clothes by hand and hanging on the patio to dry so she didn't think it was funny. She just wanted to get in and out of there alive without issues but me as a kid with la "pavera" couldn't stop laughing so I got a few smacks on the head back then. The funny thing is, the more my mom smacked me to stop, the harder I laughed and she got madder. That is "la pavera" in Puerto Rico. My kids had it. Its funny and it could be annoying if you are the grown up. I have to give it to my mom, raising 4 of us back then wasn't easy.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2021, 09:05 PM
 
3,206 posts, read 3,605,632 times
Reputation: 4801
SanJuanStar, I enjoyed reading your post. It took me back home.

My memories are a bit different regarding The Caserios I habitually ventured into, in my hometown of Vega Alta. They were named Francisco Vega Sánchez (FVS) and Las Violetas. As like any Caserio, bad element was always present. However, these were the places wherein I met and became friends/family with the most loyal people I've ever known in my life.

I had blood relatives in Caserio FVS which is located right across from the High School I attended. My distant aunt (Doña Vara, RIP) was the town Limber Maker. She sold them by cup size at 10 or 25 cents. Everyone loved Doña Vara. And she was always happy to receive anyone who walked up to her first floor balcony for one of her delicious limbers.

Of her six children, Doña Vara had one son who was athletically gifted. Ivan played basketball, baseball, and was an amateur Boxer known for his heavy handed punches. I watched Ivan fight only once (no protective gear involved). His opponent quit at the start of the 3rd round. Ivan was one of those Caserio guys who looked after everyone whom he considered family or friend.

One of my Best Friends resided in Caserio Las Violetas. Viroldo (As he was known, RIP) was a tall Black Boricua. His mom (Doña Cheva, RIP) was known and loved by everyone (thugs included) in Las Violetas. Even though she was aware of the nefarious activities surrounding her, never once did I hear Doña Cheva speak ill of anyone. She was kind, lovable, and was everyone's Favorite Mom. Doña Cheva was untouchable. By extension, I was part of my Friend's family in Caserio Las Violetas.

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2021, 12:22 PM
 
429 posts, read 102,112 times
Reputation: 300
We could have drinks with food and talk all day about the old days in Puerto Rico. I heard Las Violetas growing up. The closest to my house about 15 mins was Barbosa because I had friends in school that lived there and we used to walked in groups a female classmate during the day to take her back to Barbosa so nobody messes with her. Some Puerto Ricans see a young female walking alone and they get stupid, especially if they are drinking. They gave sexual harassment it's on definition in P.R., it was brutal back then so we always protected her (behind my mother's back, she had rules of places to stay away from. Caserios was one and billiards joints that served liquor was another) My friends and I went anyway behind her back and we played pool for hours. We ditched school sometimes and played pool for hours. That's were I got hooked with the drink "Mavi" really cold (It was cheap too) . It's good.


This is a true story, one time we ditched school to play pool and it was a local cheap joint about 10 minutes from the school. The freakin' principal found out after We did it a few times before (I'm thinking one "chota" (informer) in the class ratted on us) and she came walking to the joint looking for us. One of my friends saw her walking towards the joint and he screamed "La Principal" we dropped everything and escaped by the back door. My friend jumped out the window ( We still laugh 'till this day) and we climbed the roof and we were hiding on the roof. She saw most of us (she knew who were there) and she called each of our parents and the next day she called all of us in her office. We were grounded for a while and we had to clean the school after class as punishment. I didn't have it bad, I had to pick up leaves for 1 week. My other friends had to help the janitor clean the restrooms and the janitor was old school, she wouldn't let them go until the restrooms were spotless. She even had them take out the writing on the walls. The boys restrooms were nasty. I would never do a #2 in there. I always held it until I got home, it was bad. It was something from the horror movies. It was that bad and the smell. The janitor hosed it 3 times a week but that didn't help. That's public schools for you in P.R.


Goint back to caserios (ghettos), the ones with the worst reputations growing up was LLorens and la Perla. Perla was the worst. My mother knew the violence and crime and the drug raids by the police and she told me to stay away from there. That if I got arrested in the raid, she wouldn't bail me out (LMAO) She always told me that. I knew she was trying to protect me but it's funny how Mothers lay down the rules. Tough love. The raids by the police got so bad one time in a lot of these places that they brought the National Guard and military trucks and war vehicles with soldiers with helmets and riffles. It was martial law in the caserios. I felt bad for the good residents in there . I felt the government over stepped their grounds and made matters worse and abused their powers and some were abusive. It looked like Beirut. It was a war zone but since they were poor and lower class, most Puerto Ricans didn't care what was going on. As long that it stayed just in the caserios, they didn't care.


It's one of the reason I'm for very limited government and to always check the government powers. It could be federal, state or local. I learned growing in P.R. that the government could be very abusive and will make things worse for a person giving them too much power and control. I'm the way I am because my experiences in P.R.


Last story for you. Talking about "la pavera". My last pavera as a teenager in Puerto Rico happened in my senior year in high school, 1988 at home. My older brother and me always played the fart game on each other and friends. If you could fart in front of them by surprise and get them with their mouth open that was game. "I got you" "te coji con la boca abierta" it was a boys game. Girls have more class than boys. They hated it but they laughed in school when boys did it to other boys until it was a smelly nasty fart that stink up the whole class and they get upset but it made us boys laugh harder just looking at their faces and the reaction.


Well back to the story. I got my brother sitting in the dining room with his mouth open and we were just laughing. I had "la pavera" so I couldn't stop laughing. My mother was sitting down watching her "telenovela" in the living room and women get intense watching that. I was laughing on the floor and I couldn't stop. My mother got so red and mad that I couldn't stop that she got a broom and started swinging at me to shut up but the more she got mad the more I laughed and couldn't stop. I was blocking her swings and holding the broom while laughing and she got madder and madder because I was holding the broom and didn't let go. I was talking a little trash to her while laughing "Mami, que te pasa? calmate, respira profundo, te va a dar un ataque de corazon. Mami estas lenta, que te pasa?" She wanted to kill me. I let go and ran out the house I didn't go back until 4 hours later until she calmed down and she went to bed. My brother enjoyed it, he was sitting on the dining table laughing while my Mom came at me with a broom. I got her roses the next day and took her to eat empanadillas to bring peace. I gave her a big bear hug and I didn't let go until I felt she let her anger go, I didn't want to get smack in between. I was ready to duck but I held that bear hug long. I learned that from my father whenever you wanted to calm down Mom. Like the saying goes, Happy wife and happy life. In this case happy mother, happy home.



The lesson I learned is NEVER, NEVER, NEVER interrupt a Puerto Rican woman and her telenovela. They will get hostile on you. My sisters were the same but Mom was the worst.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2021, 02:44 PM
 
1,821 posts, read 4,181,924 times
Reputation: 4911
Monte Hatillo was my "Llorens" growing up. I was born to this planet and spent the first 10 or so years of my life at Colinas de Monte Carlo, butted up against the hills just south of Monte Hatillo. Things were OK during the late 70s when my parents decided to buy there, but soured in a decade's time with the increase in drug trafficking and the after effects of the US economy going in the tank in the early 80s when I was born. By the late 80s things were getting tough in Monte Hatillo, so it began spilling over into Monte Carlo. One break-in to our little house while we were thankfully at school and parents at work, and that was the cue to my father to GTFO. Many more break ins would occur in the neighborhood during those years.

We proceeded to move to Hato Rey and that's where I completed the coming of age chapter of my life, the part I consider most formative as an adult anyways. Easier commute for both my parents, and close to the schools my sister and I attended.

I remember one instance going to the rec center at Monte Carlo a year or so after we had moved to Hato Rey, for a halloween stroll with the neighborhood kids, since the urbanization in Hato Rey we moved to was an older demographic neighborhood in the process of converting into what it is today, mixed residential/commercial and de facto student housing for UPR students. Given we still knew folks from the neighborhood I guess my dad thought it was a good idea. Well, as we were driving in on the edge of Monte hatillo (you have to, it's butted up against it), apparently someone chucked a sizeable stone from the caserío units at the car, Gaza Strip intifada style, went into the window ("luckily" the window was down, since the AC was broken) and struck my father in the arm and me in the leg as it bounced in the car. I'll never forget the fact I always thought that level of random violence was par for the course growing up, and made me understand why my parents were so restrictive with me all the way to high school graduation.

At any rate, that was Monte Hatillo then, I'm sure nothing has changed now. They were always having gang exchanges across 65 de Infantería with the Berwind Towers, which I'm sure didn't help matters.

As a child of middle class pensioners down there, it's easy to highlight the gentrification going on in the cost of living front. It certainly kicked me off the island through no fault of my own. Watching these folks live rent and utilities free, running those AC window units year round while living off the cash economy can bring about a lot of frustration to those of us paying 33% income tax on a measly >65K, something folks in the CONUS have no concept of when they spout nonsense about Puerto Rican largesse. At any rate, my point is that I still wouldn't trade them conditions. It's no picnic living with that kind of permanent cortisol-heightened existence. It scars you chemically. My "indoor pet" childhood was alright all things considered. It was just a diurnal life schedule. It didn't cripple me, though I can understand how for continentals that kind of life restriction may appear indignant. Beats getting shot and stabbed at a pub over NOTHING. I digress.

Concur on the comments above regarding Llorens and La Perla having the worst reputations in the 80s and 90s regarding both organized and random violence. Most caseríos in the non-metro municipalities were much more "campesino" in nature, and the violent crime element was much more scarce by comparison. Abject material poverty however, was worse in the rural caseríos though, much worse imo.

I could tell so many stories about the day to day of growing up into adulthood in PR, but I'll digress here for the sake of brevity. Caseríos are certainly part and parcel of the landscape of Puerto Rican living, even if one is not a resident.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2021, 10:12 PM
 
3,206 posts, read 3,605,632 times
Reputation: 4801
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
We could have drinks with food and talk all day about the old days in Puerto Rico. I heard Las Violetas growing up. The closest to my house about 15 mins was Barbosa because I had friends in school that lived there and we used to walked in groups a female classmate during the day to take her back to Barbosa so nobody messes with her. Some Puerto Ricans see a young female walking alone and they get stupid, especially if they are drinking. They gave sexual harassment it's on definition in P.R., it was brutal back then so we always protected her (behind my mother's back, she had rules of places to stay away from. Caserios was one and billiards joints that served liquor was another) My friends and I went anyway behind her back and we played pool for hours. We ditched school sometimes and played pool for hours. That's were I got hooked with the drink "Mavi" really cold (It was cheap too) . It's good.

. . .
Tried to re-rep you but, the CD gods won't allow it.

Caserios aside, my other fondest memories were my teenage Sunday morning 7 mile jogs from our house in Santa Rita Vega Alta, to Playa Cerro Gordo.

I would make this jog once or twice a month. Sundays were the only days my parents slept in. I'd get up well before they were up. I'd rummage for loose change through my dad's pants and living room sofa. As I've described before, back in the mid 70's, I needed no more than $1.50 to make it through the day. Before taking off, I made sure I ate breakfast, had coffee, drank water, etc., . . . and off I'd go by 8am, well before the midday sun's heat.

I'd start jogging the moment my Converse sneakers hit the concrete on Calle 14. By the time I got to #2 Highway (La Numero Dos) I'd already broken into a sweat. I carried no water. The only thing on my possession was $1.50. No ID. It was just me, the road, my sweat, the destination ahead of me, and the thoughts that entertained my mind as I jogged to Playa Cerro Gordo.

As soon as I arrived at the beach, my ritual was always the same: chill for a while beneath the shadow of a palm tree until I was no longer sweating profusely. After that, I'd go to the only nearby store/pub to buy a "fritura" and a Corona beer. That was my lunch. If I happened to have a loose joint (un moto), I'd walk up to a certain part of "el monte" where I could smoke weed in privacy.

A swim in the calm lazy warm waters of Cerro Gordo came next.

By the time I finished my swim, there were always plenty of people on the beach whom I knew. We'd chat, laugh, check out the girls, etc.

I always started to walk back home between 3 and 4 pm. Each time I started walking - without fail - someone I knew would stop to offer a ride; a ride I always accepted.

Once home, it was time for a long cool shower, and ready for mom's home cooked dinner.

My goodness. What great, beautiful, and simple times those were.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2021, 02:01 AM
 
429 posts, read 102,112 times
Reputation: 300
Wow. You got me with memory lane with old Puerto Rico. You mentioned Converse and I went back in time. Before Nike being big, Converse used to be the big brand in Puerto Rico. I owned the Chuck Taylors white for years for school. Every early August before school started we used to go to Rio Piedras downtown and Bayamon downtown (it was closer to us) to get the school clothes and supplies. Best prices. I missed the hot dogs stands while shopping from those days. They made really good hot dogs. One of the hot dog carts with wheels was stolen from the owner in front of his house one day. He lived a few blocks from me and was eating dinner and the cart parked in front of the house and the thieves just took it and he was chasing them in "chanklas" and boxer shorts around the blocks. I still laugh like it was yesterday. So many stories. He got the cart back but with pieces, hot dog breads and supplies all over the street. The dogs were happy, they attacked it fast. Cops came like 2 hours later. Then they got in their car and turned the siren on to go to eat. Some cops in P.R. will do that, turn the siren on so cars get out of the way so they go to eat or go do something personal. I went on vacation in the island like 8 years ago and I was in Hato Rey with a rent-a-car and a cop had the lights on behind me and he was bumper to bumper so I pulled on the side on the road and they passed me by and ended up in the Margarita Mexican place to eat. I went there to eat in the first place and found them eating at the table. Some things never change. We used to go Margaritas a lot in the 80's. The menu is not the same. Metropol in Isla Verde is still very good.



Remember the Kung Fu sandals that came out around 1978? (give or take) Hector Travieso made the commercial on tv? LMAO! Everybody wanted one at school until the garbage didn't last 1 month. A few of my classmates had holes in their sandals after a few weeks. They didn't care, they wore it to school with their big toes sticking out.


I remember Cerro Gordo. Luquillo. El Escambron. My friend's parents had a vacation home in Cabo Rojo and he always showed me pictures. It's pretty. That's one of a few places I never went in Puerto Rico. It was too far of a drive but it's on my list to finally see. I seen about 90% of P.R. I have never been to Culebra. I need to go for at least 1 week or more to hit that side of the island.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2021, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Philly
10,067 posts, read 14,895,104 times
Reputation: 2804
when cabrini green in chicago was demolished they found people had carved holes in the walls between apartments because it wasn't safe to use the hallways
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-21-2021, 09:54 PM
 
3,206 posts, read 3,605,632 times
Reputation: 4801
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
Wow. You got me with memory lane with old Puerto Rico. You mentioned Converse and I went back in time. Before Nike being big, Converse used to be the big brand in Puerto Rico. I owned the Chuck Taylors white for years for school. Every early August before school started we used to go to Rio Piedras downtown and Bayamon downtown (it was closer to us) to get the school clothes and supplies. Best prices. I missed the hot dogs stands while shopping from those days. They made really good hot dogs. One of the hot dog carts with wheels was stolen from the owner in front of his house one day. He lived a few blocks from me and was eating dinner and the cart parked in front of the house and the thieves just took it and he was chasing them in "chanklas" and boxer shorts around the blocks. I still laugh like it was yesterday. So many stories. He got the cart back but with pieces, hot dog breads and supplies all over the street. The dogs were happy, they attacked it fast. Cops came like 2 hours later. Then they got in their car and turned the siren on to go to eat. Some cops in P.R. will do that, turn the siren on so cars get out of the way so they go to eat or go do something personal. I went on vacation in the island like 8 years ago and I was in Hato Rey with a rent-a-car and a cop had the lights on behind me and he was bumper to bumper so I pulled on the side on the road and they passed me by and ended up in the Margarita Mexican place to eat. I went there to eat in the first place and found them eating at the table. Some things never change. We used to go Margaritas a lot in the 80's. The menu is not the same. Metropol in Isla Verde is still very good.



Remember the Kung Fu sandals that came out around 1978? (give or take) Hector Travieso made the commercial on tv? LMAO! Everybody wanted one at school until the garbage didn't last 1 month. A few of my classmates had holes in their sandals after a few weeks. They didn't care, they wore it to school with their big toes sticking out.


I remember Cerro Gordo. Luquillo. El Escambron. My friend's parents had a vacation home in Cabo Rojo and he always showed me pictures. It's pretty. That's one of a few places I never went in Puerto Rico. It was too far of a drive but it's on my list to finally see. I seen about 90% of P.R. I have never been to Culebra. I need to go for at least 1 week or more to hit that side of the island.
Now it's you who took me back with your mentions of Kung Fu Slippers, Cabo Rojo, and Culebra.

Kung Fu Slippers were around since the song "Kung Fu Fighting" came out in 1974. I recall wearing KF Slippers around 1975/76 in NYC. Back then, it was cool to wear KF slippers and to cuff up your pant legs a few inches (to my surprise, I saw a young man with cuffed-up pant legs today).

I visited La Parguera (near Cabo Rojo) around 2008 and rented a room at an oceanfront hotel. Did a little sightseeing and boating. But, the most unforgettable moment of that trip came the last day I was there. I got up early and walked the length of a nearby "entablado" over the water. No one else was there. I took several pictures and enjoyed the beauty of it all. A little later, an elderly couple (possibly in their 70's) made their way in my direction while holding hands, smiling, walking, and talking. We greeted each other. They asked if I would be kind enough to take their picture. How could anyone say no? They smiled as I took two pictures. They thanked me. We got into a conversation. Like me, they were visitors, not local residents. I explained how this was my first time in the area and how impressed I was with the natural beauty of La Parguera. To this day, I still recall the exact words of that 70 year old gentleman:

"Nosotros los puertorriqueños tenemos una casita bien bonita. Debemos cuidarla.
(Us Puerto Ricans have a lovely little house. We should take care of it.)"

Bro, Culebra is a "must-do." Please, do yourself a favor and put it on your bucket list. My very strong recommendation:

Pay a little extra and take that 15 minute flight from Fajardo (or 20 minute flight from Isla Verde) to Culebra.

Forget travelling there via the lancha (ferry) which takes an hour and is rife with setbacks. Rent a Jeep, not a low profile sedan. Trust me, you will need the Jeep. If it's still there, have a few beers and something to eat at "Mamacitas Restaurant" before heading to white sand "Playa Flamenco" or "Playa Zoni." Find a place that rents kayaks and go kayaking in the bay. The currents will push you into the ocean. Be prepared to paddle hard and much to get back into the bay.

I visited Culebra twice.

Enjoy!


Last edited by chacho_keva; 01-21-2021 at 10:05 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2021, 12:04 AM
 
429 posts, read 102,112 times
Reputation: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
Now it's you who took me back with your mentions of Kung Fu Slippers, Cabo Rojo, and Culebra.

Kung Fu Slippers were around since the song "Kung Fu Fighting" came out in 1974. I recall wearing KF Slippers around 1975/76 in NYC. Back then, it was cool to wear KF slippers and to cuff up your pant legs a few inches (to my surprise, I saw a young man with cuffed-up pant legs today).

I visited La Parguera (near Cabo Rojo) around 2008 and rented a room at an oceanfront hotel. Did a little sightseeing and boating. But, the most unforgettable moment of that trip came the last day I was there. I got up early and walked the length of a nearby "entablado" over the water. No one else was there. I took several pictures and enjoyed the beauty of it all. A little later, an elderly couple (possibly in their 70's) made their way in my direction while holding hands, smiling, walking, and talking. We greeted each other. They asked if I would be kind enough to take their picture. How could anyone say no? They smiled as I took two pictures. They thanked me. We got into a conversation. Like me, they were visitors, not local residents. I explained how this was my first time in the area and how impressed I was with the natural beauty of La Parguera. To this day, I still recall the exact words of that 70 year old gentleman:

"Nosotros los puertorriqueños tenemos una casita bien bonita. Debemos cuidarla.
(Us Puerto Ricans have a lovely little house. We should take care of it.)"

Bro, Culebra is a "must-do." Please, do yourself a favor and put it on your bucket list. My very strong recommendation:

Pay a little extra and take that 15 minute flight from Fajardo (or 20 minute flight from Isla Verde) to Culebra.

Forget travelling there via the lancha (ferry) which takes an hour and is rife with setbacks. Rent a Jeep, not a low profile sedan. Trust me, you will need the Jeep. If it's still there, have a few beers and something to eat at "Mamacitas Restaurant" before heading to white sand "Playa Flamenco" or "Playa Zoni." Find a place that rents kayaks and go kayaking in the bay. The currents will push you into the ocean. Be prepared to paddle hard and much to get back into the bay.

I visited Culebra twice.

Enjoy!




You must be in my older brother and sister'd group. I was like 3 yrs. old in 1974. I only remember from that time going to the beach with my brothers and cousins to Luquillo and singing those Puerto Rican songs on the way. I was the youngest of the group. I still remember the lyrics. "vamos a la playa calienta sol" . Life was so much simple back then.


Kun Fu slippers must have made a comeback in 1978 because I remember Grease just came out and my big sisters had the Travolta fever like every girl in the island and that's when I saw Hector Travieso's commercial promoting the sandals. He had a white Karate suit kicking somebody up and then looking in the cameras saying don't buy the imitation, buy the real one . I was kid watching it and said "I want one". I was almost going to get it until I realized it was garbage. I wouldn't even wear inside the house. No cushion.



Another story, Carmen Jovet in 1978 had a tv show where high schools students representing their school came to the show and competed with other schools. When the show started she said we got John Travolta on the show don't turn the channel, stay with us. Everybody went crazy. My sisters called her girlfriends and they all came to my house quick and the house was packed with all girls glued to the tv waiting for Travolta. You couldn't even walk in the living room. In every commercial break she made it bigger by reminding the audience to don't turn the channel, Travolta is here. Then like 10 mins before the show ended, she puts a video with Travolta in an interview flying a small plane in English. They just played a pre-recorded old interview from the states in English in which many didn't even understand. I saw the faces of my sisters and her friends. I just started to laugh and couldn't stop. That was my first "pavera" in Puerto Rico. You could hear the girls asking my sisters, "que dice? que lindoooo pero que dice". "Cuando va a salir al estudio" "el esta aqui?" "cuando va a salir" and my sisters faces were classic. I was just laughing hard. First time I got kicked out of my own house by my sisters and her friends. Girls could get nasty when they get together. Most of them were cute but they were mad at Carmen Jovet.



I remember the 1976 elections in Puerto Rico during the campaign. First time I saw Barcelo on tv and he was riding a horse. I was "who the hell is this guy?""That's cool, he is going to win, he rides a horse in the city" (that's why kids shouldn't vote) and my mom was cooking, she cursed something and a few months later he won the election. That's when Bayamon turned into a PNP town. They always had parades and music events all the time. That was part of growing up in the island, living under the PNP machine. Back then, if you wanted a government job in the city even a summer job, you better say you are PNP or you would have a hard time getting a job. Carolina was the opposite, that was a PPD town. I had friends from Carolina. Interesting town. When I was growing up, Carolina had a lot of "cocolos" and later "raperos". I used to hang around Bayamon, Guaynabo, San Juan and Carolina. Those were my spots. Then when I visited the countryside it was Barranquintas, Comerio and Aguas Buenas (my favorite). That's my favorite town to live. Up there in the mountains and lots of grass and trees. Give me a mango, avocado, guayaba and parcha trees and a maca I'm happy with the breeze up there and away from the city.


We got a lot of stories from old Puerto Rico. Somebody should do a TV series. We would be advisers in the set.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top