Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Celebrating Memorial Day!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
 [Register]
U.S. Territories Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, etc.
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-05-2024, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Hudson County, New Jersey
12,192 posts, read 8,062,626 times
Reputation: 10178

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
I also heard crime is rising in NYC. I'm sure the people in Pennsylvania are in fear because of that, especially those in Pittsburgh.
Crime rate is dropping fast in NYC, since COVID.

Mostly due to the fast gentrification in the city, especially in Brooklyn, Queens and Upper Manhattan. Puerto Ricans are getting pushed out (in relation to this thread) at alarming number and its really sad. Even Jersey is too expensive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-06-2024, 11:26 PM
 
13,499 posts, read 4,320,825 times
Reputation: 5406
Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
Do they though? I thought that the vast majority were Puerto Rican?

Are they Dominican/Haitian?

The vast majority in jail in the island are natives, Puerto Ricans. Only aprox. 100,000 Dominicans live in P.R. and about 30k are illegal but that's not a violent crime by itself. Haitians are very rare in P.R. I saw maybe 3 or 4 in San Juan when I lived there but they never stay long.



I saw more Arabs than Haitians in P.R. I met many Dominicans in the island. I had a few in my class. A lot of them were servants, housekeepers, cooks and work in construction for the upper class in Puerto Rico. They made Santurce (barrio of San Juan) into little D.R. but I left over 30 years ago so now I assume they are a lot more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2024, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
10,143 posts, read 15,024,668 times
Reputation: 10453
There are also mny Dominicans in the professions, but generally they look more like the typical Puerto Rican and they tend not to make it known they are Dominicans, so they sort of invincible to the average Puerto Rican as the only way most people would know they are Dominicans is if they say it. But most Dominicans are what was said by San Juan Star, those in the working class/blue collar types.

The Puerto Rican emigration after probably has more to do with the perception that now there are more than actual growth of the community. Simply if more native Puerto Ricans left the island, the percentages will increase on the island even if there isn't much growth and that means in everyday living you will bump into more than in previous times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2024, 08:38 AM
 
13,499 posts, read 4,320,825 times
Reputation: 5406
Well when I was there it was easy to spot a Dominican. There Spanish accent especially the older generation. The younger generation blended well and it was hard to tell until you met their parents or their families (they don't come to P.R. alone) and I went to their homes and saw Dominican symbols in the house. Cubans in Puerto Rico are the same. You can tell by their accent. Some blend in and speak like native Puerto Ricans, others could never let go of their accent. I'm sure it's the same in the states when you can tell what part of the states you were raised by your accent.


The ones I went to school with blended well and I couldn't tell until I met their parents. Except for Haitians that speak French, all 3 countries from the Caribbean (Cuba, D.R., Puerto Rico) can live together well because their cultures are so similar.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-08-2024, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Philly
10,227 posts, read 16,837,460 times
Reputation: 2973
Quote:
Originally Posted by masssachoicetts View Post
Crime rate is dropping fast in NYC, since COVID.

Mostly due to the fast gentrification in the city, especially in Brooklyn, Queens and Upper Manhattan. Puerto Ricans are getting pushed out (in relation to this thread) at alarming number and its really sad. Even Jersey is too expensive.
Idk, crime dropped across the nation last year. NYC has lost a lot of people since covid, it's possible the people that are leaving were on the margins and that's why crime has dropped but something more seems to be afoot, something that isn't unique to NYC. I'd also add it's only sad if the people who left aren't better off for having left, if they are, then it's only sad for NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2024, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
50,396 posts, read 64,106,567 times
Reputation: 93404
I’m no expert on the nuances, but I seems to me that there are so many different “looks” among the native PR people.

My DILs mother’s side is from Spain. They are reddish blonds with pale skin and freckles. My DIL is brunette, with very fair skin. Her father is very handsome, with dark skin and hair. Her two brothers look like their dad. It seems like there is a lot of variety in the looks of native Puerto Ricans.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 09:13 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 552,497 times
Reputation: 2695
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
Well when I was there it was easy to spot a Dominican. There Spanish accent especially the older generation. The younger generation blended well and it was hard to tell until you met their parents or their families (they don't come to P.R. alone) and I went to their homes and saw Dominican symbols in the house. Cubans in Puerto Rico are the same. You can tell by their accent. Some blend in and speak like native Puerto Ricans, others could never let go of their accent. I'm sure it's the same in the states when you can tell what part of the states you were raised by your accent.


The ones I went to school with blended well and I couldn't tell until I met their parents. Except for Haitians that speak French, all 3 countries from the Caribbean (Cuba, D.R., Puerto Rico) can live together well because their cultures are so similar.
Absolutely, it's like that in the states. I can even pick out an Arkansas accent from say a Mississippi one. Not all Southern accents are the same (especially Texas, assuming that is even a Southern state, LOL). A Boston accent is not like a Long Island one. New Orleans alone has at least THREE accents, depending on what part of the city someone was raised in. That's similar to New York, where you have New York City accents (several of them) and New York State accents.

When I lived in Hawaii there were a lot of Portuguese people. They mentioned that the ones from the mainland of Portugal had different accents from the ones who were on the smaller islands.

I speak a little Spanish because I used to live in New Mexico, but when I was in Florida I couldn't understand one word the Cubans said.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top