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Old 06-20-2008, 08:03 AM
 
2 posts, read 4,812 times
Reputation: 11

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I live in NYC and have recently begun to live on Social Security. You can imagine the lifestyle change. I am seeking a place to live that has good weather, not much humidity, reasonable RENTS (not more than $500 monthly) would like to have more space than I have in NYC (currently live in studio apartment).

My main purpose for writing is to see if I can create a realistic budget for PR living. Rent, electric, food, public transportation or car, cultural aspect. Museums, galleries, art community, art schools or classes, music scene and outdoor activities beyond the beach. Biking, hiking etc. What is your opinion on a monthly budget? One bedroom would be great or even two if possible. Do not prefer gated community, prefer living with locals and integrating into the culture. Oh...how about language? Lots of English or do I need to learn Spanish?

Thanks for any help you can provide or recommendations to resources that would give up to date information.

Seeking1
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Old 06-26-2008, 06:41 AM
 
582 posts, read 1,854,430 times
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when are you moving?
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Old 07-05-2008, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
10 posts, read 63,846 times
Reputation: 17
When we first moved to PR, our rent for a 2 bedroom house was $450/month. It was in the mountains of Caguas, not in any metro area.

If you live outside of a metro area there is no real organized reliable public transportation to speak of. You'll need a car.

We've lived here for 5 years (transplants from NJ) and (sadly) are not fluent by any stretch of the imagination in Spanish.

Don't know if your budget is doable here or not.

Also, you mentioned low humidity ... PR is a tropical island. Expect minimum 80% humidity year round.
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Old 07-07-2008, 11:55 AM
 
138 posts, read 333,772 times
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My parents on Social Security and are moving out of Puerto Rico! The cost of living is too much and also the medical attention is less than adequate. They are currently looking at NC as possible relocation. My parents have lived in PR full time since 1996.
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Old 07-07-2008, 01:59 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,732 posts, read 8,773,266 times
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You will need a car, there is no public transport aside from taxis ... there was a territorial government run bus service but they reduced it to only operating in the San Juan metro area and the other major cities to save money. The publicos are like private taxis and are not very reliable.

English is widely spoken (even in the more rural areas) but you will always encounter those who cant speak English or who speak very limited English but rest assured that the majority of Puerto Ricans speak English well enough to handle business transactions, take your order in a restaurant, etc - at least this is my experience anyhow.

The people themselves are very friendly but there are those who harbor ill will towards mainland Americans over 1898 and their inane belief that were are an occupying colonial power (they are totally oblivious to the fact that Puerto Rico is almost totally self governing and that the federal government has very little control over the day to day running of the territories). The government however is very corrupt and getting permits to build a house, run electricity, get a well (there are municipal water systems but they are not reliable) can be a very long and drawn out process where it sometimes feels like the government is not very friendly towards mainland Americans and is out to cause trouble in retaliation for the perceived colonialism. Honestly I would buy a house rather then start from scratch.
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Old 07-09-2008, 10:31 AM
 
72 posts, read 172,871 times
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Yes I believe you will need a car but you can start out in a small apartment in the metro area until you find your way around. After that you can move into a larger home a bit farther away from the Metro area which is cheaper. That said, PR has culture, history, landmarks, music and the most incredible cuisine imaginable. But it comes with a pricetag. You must be willing to give up some NY comforts (subways,accesibility,etc) Biking only in some parks with tracks and hiking in designated rainforest trails with rangers. Ohh and PR is hot and humid but you have the sea breeze that makes up for the discomfort!!!
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Old 08-07-2008, 05:45 PM
 
582 posts, read 1,854,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladygrace View Post
Yes I believe you will need a car but you can start out in a small apartment in the metro area until you find your way around. After that you can move into a larger home a bit farther away from the Metro area which is cheaper. That said, PR has culture, history, landmarks, music and the most incredible cuisine imaginable. But it comes with a pricetag. You must be willing to give up some NY comforts (subways,accesibility,etc) Biking only in some parks with tracks and hiking in designated rainforest trails with rangers. Ohh and PR is hot and humid but you have the sea breeze that makes up for the discomfort!!!
great quote!you summed it all up.There are a lot of haters here that all they do bash puerto rico about crime.But everyone overlooks the good points and you just touched them.It can't be all bad?like they say here obviously you have been there and have enjoyed what it has to offer, not pay attention to garbage standing on the street corner and focus you're time on that.
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Old 08-13-2008, 03:40 PM
 
59 posts, read 344,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayInPR View Post
When we first moved to PR... It was in the mountains of Caguas.

Also, you mentioned low humidity ... PR is a tropical island. Expect minimum 80% humidity year round.
No doubt there are many areas of the island that would have high humidity. But just out curiosity, is it really as bad as 80% minimum in interior mountainous areas such as Caguas? Since I was curious I checked today's weather for there and it showed 64% this afternoon. Of course, I have no idea if that is normal or not but it certainly didn't sound too bad for mid-August. Anyway, I'm just trying to get an idea of how the climate is up in the interior mountains compared to the coast.
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Old 08-18-2008, 05:26 AM
 
Location: Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
10 posts, read 63,846 times
Reputation: 17
I think since we were in the mountains (over 1000') we had other issues ... like clouds! Our wooden furniture was always growing mold and the inside walls of the house would "sweat" on really damp days. We don't have either of those problems where we live now in Rio Grande, at about 450' and 1/2 mile from the border of the El Yunque National Forest (federal land).

Though it was interesting to watch a cloud approach the house and see it come in the open windows and the dissipate and go out the other side.
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Old 08-18-2008, 10:42 AM
 
210 posts, read 917,288 times
Reputation: 79
do you speak spanish?
you have to speak spanish
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