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Old 07-11-2008, 05:30 PM
 
Location: St. Joseph Area
6,235 posts, read 8,633,529 times
Reputation: 3108

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Hi! I recently graduated with my education degree in history and english. I know some spanish, but I'm not fluent (I'm teaching myself though). Are there many teaching opportunities in Puerto Rico for someone like me?

Also, can someone tell me what living in Puerto Rico is like? Are Puerto Ricans bilingual? How hot/humid does it get? What is San Juan like?
Any response is appreciated,

Thanks,

Mackinac

Last edited by mackinac81; 07-11-2008 at 05:46 PM..
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Old 07-12-2008, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
10 posts, read 63,846 times
Reputation: 17
There are many English-only schools (typically private) here, though being fluent in Spanish would probably be helpful.

Kids are taught English from very early grade school (and have been for years). So almost everyone understands a fair amount of English. Though many people don't really get a chance to practice it, so they are very self conscious / uncomfortable / embarrassed if they don't get it perfect. So they won't really try.

There's also some sociological thing going on here between locals ... many will not speak in English in front of other locals. The way it was explained to me (a non-PR import from NJ) is that the quality of ones English gives away they type of schooling (public / private) that they had and thereby the social "status" of their family and upbringing. So, in a group of people who don't know each other, it will be odd to find English spoken.

But if you get one of those people alone, they'll be fine.

Heat / Humidity ?

Yesterday it was 90F in the shade ... then got down to 77F at night. That's typical summer weather for us in the mountains (we're at 400', just at the border of the El Yunque National Forest). Humidity is usually around 80%, and drops at night, also.
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Old 07-25-2008, 07:25 PM
 
8 posts, read 54,283 times
Reputation: 11
I know what you're talking about Ray! They don't like to hear anyone speak it either! But I always spoke in English to my family whenever I didn't want anybody else to understand what I was saying ! LOL.
El yunque is so spectacular! You're so lucky to live there!

As for teaching opportunities I do know that the system is centralized, I believe the word is, and teachers are placed on a waiting list. I have been told that if you have good connections with people in high places, you can be jumped ahead.
My niece has been waiting three years and she's currently at # 319. She's now seeking work in NYC Education.

The private school system will hire you to teach English, but I hear the majority pay low wages and have no benefits. Although it's a good way to gain experience.

So good luck, and if you want to live here, go for it! It's got lots of good things!
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Old 07-27-2008, 05:25 PM
 
86 posts, read 377,272 times
Reputation: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mackinac81 View Post
Hi! I recently graduated with my education degree in history and english. I know some spanish, but I'm not fluent (I'm teaching myself though). Are there many teaching opportunities in Puerto Rico for someone like me?

Also, can someone tell me what living in Puerto Rico is like? Are Puerto Ricans bilingual? How hot/humid does it get? What is San Juan like?
Any response is appreciated,

Thanks,

Mackinac


Hey are you in the UP ? If so Iam here too. I am a rican lving in the UP.
Look for employment in the private schools in PR first. Go there visit and speak to people.
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Old 07-31-2008, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Buffalo NY
41 posts, read 186,874 times
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Hi, try the DOD school systems the main schools elementary, middle, and high are located in FT Buchanan. Being an english teacher might help you plus if you do not land a teaching position you might start as a substitute which also are well paid. The good part if you become a teacher you have all the benefits plus you become a federal goverment employee. Try looking on line thru the DOD or by Antilles consolidated school systems. If you have any other questions don't hesitate in contacting me. good luck gato!!
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Old 08-04-2008, 12:35 PM
 
9 posts, read 67,261 times
Reputation: 14
I don't think you're gonna get paid like if you were teaching in the US, but if you really want to move to PR I think your best option is to work in a private bilingual school while you apply for a job in the Government as a teacher.. Don't expect good salaries, but PR is a fun place. Just be careful of who are your friends...
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Old 09-01-2008, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Rincon Puerto Rico
5 posts, read 49,727 times
Reputation: 14
Default Teaching in Puerto Rico

Hi,
I am a teacher in Puerto Rico and I too come from the states and have an English/History degree. I work in the public school system and they give you a lot of bureaucratic hurdles to become a teacher.
You don't teach English speaking Spanish. To become a tenured teacher you need a license. It is easier getting a job in a private school, but pay is lower. Many don't ask for a license.
I don't think you'll have problems getting a job here, as the rules are different for degrees from the US. I had to take a few education courses, since I didn't have any.
I came down to teach for a year in 1991, and I didn't leave. You don't get rich being a teacher, but you can grow and help your students too as well. You get plenty of time off during the year and I've been to at least a dozen islands in the Caribbean. I fell in love with diving and tropical life and I don't think I could ever go back to the states.


luis
ps
dod jobs, much competition to aquire, much better pay
Moderator cut: cut

Last edited by Sam I Am; 09-02-2008 at 04:48 PM.. Reason: Removed junk
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Old 10-22-2008, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 882,957 times
Reputation: 105
What is an average salary for a teacher (at different levels and public/private institutions) in PR?
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Old 10-27-2008, 12:31 PM
 
1,764 posts, read 3,710,915 times
Reputation: 1411
The teachers I know that work in Puerto Rico have second jobs... if that tells you anything.
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Old 10-27-2008, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 882,957 times
Reputation: 105
Well, to answer my own question, this is what I have found.

Puerto Rico 2004 Salary Data

Data is from 2004, but knowing how things work the numbers probably did not change much. It is interesting to learn that "50 percent earned more than $17,010 per year". Of course this does not say much about the average income in the Metro S.J. area. However, this may imply something about the average cost of living. If most people make around 17k a year, then things can't be too expensive or these people would starve to death. On the flip side this explains the high rate of theft and other petty crime.
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