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Old 10-18-2014, 06:40 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reyindio View Post
Under PR citizenship in Spain one is considered a spanish subject , so if you decided to live in Spain you can qualify for Spanish citizenship within 2 yrs of residing there as opposed to 10 for everyone else. Also along with Spanish citizenship you automatically are given European Union citizenship too.
Please link official sites to support these assertions. Thanks.
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Old 10-19-2014, 01:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
Please link official sites to support these assertions. Thanks.
He's right, but not for the correct reasons. Anyone who is a natural born from a country (this also includes Puerto Rico) that is a member of the Organization of Ibero-American States is eligible for dual Spanish citizenship after 2 years legal residency, and you can keep your other passport. The only non OEI state that has this benefit as well is the Philippines. All others must wait 10 years and must surrender their other passports and nationalities.

Tener la doble nacionalidad - Ministerio de Justicia


Quote:
¿Qué nacionalidades es posible compartir con la española?


No es necesario que renuncien a su nacionalidad quienes fueran naturales de países iberoamericanos, de Andorra, Filipinas, Guinea Ecuatorial o Portugal. Se consideran países iberoamericanos a estos efectos aquéllos en los que el español o el portugués sean una de las lenguas oficiales.
A efectos de adquirir la doble nacionalidad Haití, Jamaica, Trinidad y Tobago y Guyana no se consideran iberoamericanos mientras que Puerto Rico sí se considera iberoamericano.
Translation: It's not necessary to renounce your nationality if you are a natural born from an Ibero-American country, Andorra, Philippines, Equatorial Guinea, or Portugal. Countries that are considered Ibero-American are those that Spanish or Portuguese are one of the official languages. In lieu of obtaining dual nationality, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, and Guyana are not considered Ibero-American while Puerto Rico is considered Ibero-American
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Old 10-19-2014, 05:12 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 60,690,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
He's right, but not for the correct reasons. Anyone who is a natural born from a country (this also includes Puerto Rico) that is a member of the Organization of Ibero-American States is eligible for dual Spanish citizenship after 2 years legal residency, and you can keep your other passport. The only non OEI state that has this benefit as well is the Philippines. All others must wait 10 years and must surrender their other passports and nationalities.

Tener la doble nacionalidad - Ministerio de Justicia


Translation: It's not necessary to renounce your nationality if you are a natural born from an Ibero-American country, Andorra, Philippines, Equatorial Guinea, or Portugal. Countries that are considered Ibero-American are those that Spanish or Portuguese are one of the official languages. In lieu of obtaining dual nationality, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, and Guyana are not considered Ibero-American while Puerto Rico is considered Ibero-American
That addresses the issue of dual nationality but not a 2 year residency requirement. Nor is it the law of the immigrant country which can determine the immigrant's right to continue holding citizenship in the "parent" country.
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Old 10-19-2014, 09:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
That addresses the issue of dual nationality but not a 2 year residency requirement. Nor is it the law of the immigrant country which can determine the immigrant's right to continue holding citizenship in the "parent" country.
It does address it. Because the co-condition of being allowed dual citizenship is part of the 2 year residency requirement. You can't be eligible for the 2 year residency requirement if you are also not eligible for dual citizenship
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Old 10-19-2014, 10:17 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
It does address it. Because the co-condition of being allowed dual citizenship is part of the 2 year residency requirement. You can't be eligible for the 2 year residency requirement if you are also not eligible for dual citizenship
I still can't find anything relevant on a Spanish immigration site but in any event, this part nonetheless holds true:

"Nor is it the law of the immigrant country which can determine the immigrant's right to continue holding citizenship in the "parent" country."
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Old 10-19-2014, 10:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
I still can't find anything relevant on a Spanish immigration site but in any event, this part nonetheless holds true:

"Nor is it the law of the immigrant country which can determine the immigrant's right to continue holding citizenship in the "parent" country."
STT, I linked you to the government website that governs such matters. It can't get any clearer than that from the country's justice department, whose task is to enforce the country's laws, and that includes its immigration laws.
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Old 10-19-2014, 11:15 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 60,690,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
STT, I linked you to the government website that governs such matters. It can't get any clearer than that from the country's justice department, whose task is to enforce the country's laws, and that includes its immigration laws.
I guess I must need new glasses as I can't find any section on immigration on that site which is the Ministry of Justice site. But I have found the actual immigration website for Spain so will take a look later on. Still doesn't alter the fact that dual citizenship can only be granted by the country to which one emigrates. In other words, Spain can allow an immigrant to become a citizen without requiring the new citizen to relinquish allegiance to the new citizen's former country but if the former country's laws don't recognize dual citizenship, Spain can't force that country to accept it.

The US is particularly sticky where this is concerned and the Oath of Allegiance taken by new citizens includes such relinquishment.
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Old 10-19-2014, 11:40 AM
 
25,058 posts, read 24,036,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
I guess I must need new glasses as I can't find any section on immigration on that site which is the Ministry of Justice site. But I have found the actual immigration website for Spain so will take a look later on. Still doesn't alter the fact that dual citizenship can only be granted by the country to which one emigrates. In other words, Spain can allow an immigrant to become a citizen without requiring the new citizen to relinquish allegiance to the new citizen's former country but if the former country's laws don't recognize dual citizenship, Spain can't force that country to accept it.

The US is particularly sticky where this is concerned and the Oath of Allegiance taken by new citizens includes such relinquishment.
The US does allow dual citizenship. It has been established through case law, any American can be a dual citizen. In the past, an American sued the federal government in federal court, and won the case, thereby establishing dual citizenship in the US.
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Old 10-19-2014, 12:28 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 60,690,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
The US does allow dual citizenship. It has been established through case law, any American can be a dual citizen. In the past, an American sued the federal government in federal court, and won the case, thereby establishing dual citizenship in the US.
I'm aware of and understand that but it nonetheless remains a grey area still and not quite as cut and dried as one may assume. The Oath of Allegiance taken by new citizens during naturalization still contains renouncement of all allegiance to other countries and dual citizenship is still only officially recognized in certain circumstances. It's an interesting situation which, as the world gets so much smaller through globalization, means less and less.
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Old 10-19-2014, 03:05 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,732 posts, read 8,782,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
I'm aware of and understand that but it nonetheless remains a grey area still and not quite as cut and dried as one may assume. The Oath of Allegiance taken by new citizens during naturalization still contains renouncement of all allegiance to other countries and dual citizenship is still only officially recognized in certain circumstances. It's an interesting situation which, as the world gets so much smaller through globalization, means less and less.
I have a good friend who was born in Lebanon and she had to renounce her Lebanese citizenship to become a US citizen in 2006.
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