U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
 [Register]
U.S. Territories Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, etc.
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-16-2009, 02:43 PM
 
11 posts, read 77,303 times
Reputation: 15

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by InNeedOfAnswers View Post
While planning the move, I spent about a year on searching for information about PR. What is amazing is the spectrum of opinions and attitudes you will find out there. There are people who will simply vent at PR and hate it completely. There are people who absolutely love it, but do recognize the downsides. I suppose that much of this discrepancy has to do with the income brackets. From what I have seen and from the people whom I spoke to, it is apparent that if you have reasonable income then your live in PR is not all that bad. Obviously not having money is bad no matter where you live. As an external observer and one that has been to few islands around the world, the social and economic climates can go to extremes due to isolation. This is something that one should expect and must get used to.

Another interesting observation that I made is the fact that people who seem to complain about economy and the way things are in PR never suggest how they are contributing to correcting this problem. At the same token, when someone like myself and trying2gettoPR try to move to PR, we are faced with many walls, for example the language. This is ironic, as we are bringing skills, education, and enthusiasm to help the economy and make the place more comfortable for everyone. I don't expect a red carpet upon my arrival, but what I think would be of a benefit to nation like PR is to make it easy for highly skilled people to migrate in. Few examples of easy migration to PR would be to have excise taxes on vehicles that are part of personal goods moved waved or reduced. To have legal forms in English to make the submission process easier, etc. With time I will learn Spanish, and will embrace PR culture, but some incubation interval would be nice
Try a clerk position with Internal Revenue Service. I hope in a few years this division is dismantled, but nonetheless a federal position might help. You would have to learn quickly if you don't know the language, but as a clerk you might get by.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-22-2009, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 883,210 times
Reputation: 105
My move to PR is complete! I was successful in getting everything done with my VERY limited knowledge of Spanish. Was it easy? No. Was it painless? No. Did I enjoy it? No. However, I found that people are quite understanding here and willing to help. The key is to be nice and not pushy. Also, it helps to know what exactly your specific goal on hand is (i.e., which form to fill out next and where to pay for it, etc.). Hence, most of the time what I needed to do is to show someone (including people in the line waiting with their own paperwork) the form and almost always they knew which door I should go to. Of course, things are made even easier if you can get help from some of you co-workers who know where the appropriate offices are located (this can be a trick as many of the official web pages don't list physical addresses). Long story short, all is in place and all of my legal documents have been successfully submitted and accepted.

The key words to learn are: line, door, window, right/left and basic directions, the numbers, and the pleasantries. Any additional knowledge of Spanish is a bonus. An interesting note, most of the private corporations that I had to deal with has some employee that knew English sufficiently well to get stuff done fast. Same cannot be guaranteed when dealing with any of the government offices. (I got really lucky in the DMV where almost every person with whom I spoke knew at least basic English.)

The move was a bit more expensive than I anticipated, but it was within acceptable limits of pain. It took a bit of time to get used to the way things operate here, but as long as one can take things at stride then all will be well.

To this point, I found that day-to-day life is a bit more expensive here. However, it is possible to eat well and live well if you go shopping in the non-tourist areas. Also, one should get used to the visual aspect of the non-tourist areas when driving between home and work. I often find myself thinking "only in PR"

Now I am poised and ready for the unexpected that lurks around the corner.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2009, 06:15 PM
 
10 posts, read 107,611 times
Reputation: 47
Another interesting observation that I made is the fact that people who seem to complain about economy and the way things are in PR never suggest how they are contributing to correcting this problem. At the same token, when someone like myself and [URL="//www.city-data.com/forum/members/trying2gettopr-474929.html"]trying2gettoPR[/URL] try to move to PR, we are faced with many walls, for example the language. This is ironic, as we are bringing skills, education, and enthusiasm to help the economy and make the place more comfortable for everyone. I don't expect a red carpet upon my arrival, but what I think would be of a benefit to nation like PR is to make it easy for highly skilled people to migrate in. Few examples of easy migration to PR would be to have excise taxes on vehicles that are part of personal goods moved waved or reduced. To have legal forms in English to make the submission process easier, etc. With time I will learn Spanish, and will embrace PR culture, but some incubation interval would be nice
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yeah, like there aren't highly skilled Puerto Ricans on the island. THERE ARE, but many are on their knees because Americans like you basically tell them they're inferior. Once Puerto Ricans realize that they aren't superior or INFERIOR to ANYONE-Americans included- they'll get somewhere. You barely live on the island...you don't understand this concept. Puerto Ricans are certainly capable of doing things themselves, if they would stop degrading themselves. By the way, you might want to do some research on all the islanders who go to the U.S. and largely contribute to the EEUU economy;especially engineers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2009, 05:03 AM
 
304 posts, read 802,858 times
Reputation: 281
Default I'm lurking!

Hey all!

I, too, have dreams of moving back to PR. Lived in Ponce about 20 years ago. Have traveled back to visit and have introduced hubby to the island.

We'll be making long visits over the next years to reacquaint with the island and figure where we'd like to be.

Of course we have the same safety concerns and will be bringing funds with us, so jobs won't be so important. I'm also a photographer and will thoroughly enjoy shooting such a diverse, natural enviroment.

Thank you all for your obvious love for the island and insightful comments. As our own D-day approaches, I will be in touch!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2009, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 883,210 times
Reputation: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaytusic View Post
Another interesting observation that I made is the fact that people who seem to complain about economy and the way things are in PR never suggest how they are contributing to correcting this problem. At the same token, when someone like myself and trying2gettoPR try to move to PR, we are faced with many walls, for example the language. This is ironic, as we are bringing skills, education, and enthusiasm to help the economy and make the place more comfortable for everyone. I don't expect a red carpet upon my arrival, but what I think would be of a benefit to nation like PR is to make it easy for highly skilled people to migrate in. Few examples of easy migration to PR would be to have excise taxes on vehicles that are part of personal goods moved waved or reduced. To have legal forms in English to make the submission process easier, etc. With time I will learn Spanish, and will embrace PR culture, but some incubation interval would be nice
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yeah, like there aren't highly skilled Puerto Ricans on the island. THERE ARE, but many are on their knees because Americans like you basically tell them they're inferior. Once Puerto Ricans realize that they aren't superior or INFERIOR to ANYONE-Americans included- they'll get somewhere. You barely live on the island...you don't understand this concept. Puerto Ricans are certainly capable of doing things themselves, if they would stop degrading themselves. By the way, you might want to do some research on all the islanders who go to the U.S. and largely contribute to the EEUU economy;especially engineers.
I think that you rushed too quickly to write something without thinking. Mobility of highly skilled people is unavoidable and necessary. Sharing of ideas and visions contributes to innovative thinking and ensures progress. It is no secret that there are highly skilled Puerto Ricans educated on the island. Many important positions outside of PR are held by people from PR. Therefore, as the world at large benefits from their education and their personal points of view and goals, so will Puerto Rico benefit from highly skilled individuals moving to the island. You seem to acknowledge this fact (uni-directionally) yourself at the end of the post. However, somehow you prohibit people from moving to the island!? Why do you want to close off PR from external influence, especially something positive?

PR is a beutiful and unique place. People who live here are just like any place else. It is unbelievable that you think that Americans somehow enforce their supremacy. The days of colonialism are over. PR was given a choice to vote for independence or for statehood. I think that many Americans would be happy to see PR be on its own and see their hard earned taxes go into programs that help them. You are right that I don't understand many specifics problems and their sources. However, thinking that the position in which PR is and its problems are somehow unique is an incredibly narrow point of view. Every county struggles with corrupt politicians, every country struggle with ghosts of the history, and every country has crime problems. As I have mentioned on this forum before, many seems to keep pointing out the problems that PR is struggling with, pointing out the negatives, and have conviction that all who immigrate to the island are agents of colonialism. It is difficult to find posts that say how individuals contribute to the change of statuesque. What have you done to change how things are? When was the last time you took a minute to pick up trash from the street and put it in the near garbage can?

I will not reply to the remaining unsupported implications made in your post.

Last edited by InNeedOfAnswers; 02-24-2009 at 07:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2009, 03:24 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,337 times
Reputation: 10
I work for Google and read a lot of blogs and posts and that original post is THE most ignorant post I have ever wasted my time reading!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2009, 05:37 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 60,666,082 times
Reputation: 26569
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaytusic View Post
Yeah, like there aren't highly skilled Puerto Ricans on the island. THERE ARE, but many are on their knees because Americans like you basically tell them they're inferior. Once Puerto Ricans realize that they aren't superior or INFERIOR to ANYONE-Americans included- they'll get somewhere. You barely live on the island...you don't understand this concept. Puerto Ricans are certainly capable of doing things themselves, if they would stop degrading themselves. By the way, you might want to do some research on all the islanders who go to the U.S. and largely contribute to the EEUU economy;especially engineers.
Your comment about "Americans like you" who, "tell them they're inferior" is, IMHO, very degrading, as is your comment that Puerto Ricans therefore "degrade themselves" which thus leads one to believe that your perception of Puerto Ricans is that they're collectively inferior and incapable of independent thought. With all due respect, your post makes no sense at all, particularly when you go on to say that Puerto Ricans (especially engineers) who go to the US contribute to the US economy. Your whole point thus becomes totally muddled and it's unclear exactly what you're trying to say.

Island newbies' viewpoints often change very drastically over time and I'm finding InNeedOfAnswers experiences and observations quite interesting to date and hope he'll continue to post from time to time as his knowledge of island living continues. I would say to him that that "incubation period" ain't going to happen! Your experiences thus far pretty much mirror the experiences of so many who've decided to move to the USVI and you're giving me quite a chuckle from time to time.

And, Kaytusic, there's just no need to jump in with general derogatory comments, especially when they're confusing at best. Cheers!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2009, 08:45 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,275 times
Reputation: 10
Everything everyone has posted is all true, there's the good , the bad and the ugly!

But, There's also the beautiful beaches, mountains and forests.

I came here 25 years ago, 'cuz I wanted to raise my children in the country. When my 3 year old son saw the oranges on the trees, he was amazed, I think he thought they grew in supermarkets!
I had culture shock for awhile (a loooong while) but I haven't regretted it. If you find that you just don't like it, move back, nothings written in stone, life should be an adventure. Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2009, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
4,476 posts, read 8,632,056 times
Reputation: 5530
You will defenitely find a job In PR. I advice you to take a class of spanish. But you will survive by just speaking english. In popular places they speak english. Like if you go to San Juan. There you will find a lot of people that can speak english, and maybe at Hospitals too they speak english I think. I do not know for sure. I have not been in PR ever since I was 6 yrs old.


Quote:
Originally Posted by trying2gettoPR View Post
I really want to move Puerto Rico, I have little or no spanish speaking skills, as of yet. I can order beer, that's about it. I work in the medical field as a Respiratory therapist and I have many specialities within that field, such as sleep studies and pulmonary diagnostic and pulmonary rehab training. What are my possibilities in getting a job in Puerto Rico?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top