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Old 12-19-2008, 10:34 AM
 
1 posts, read 3,615 times
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I really want to move Puerto Rico, I have little or no spanish speaking skills, as of yet. I can order beer, that's about it. I work in the medical field as a Respiratory therapist and I have many specialities within that field, such as sleep studies and pulmonary diagnostic and pulmonary rehab training. What are my possibilities in getting a job in Puerto Rico?
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Old 12-19-2008, 11:29 AM
 
1,772 posts, read 4,072,697 times
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The short answer is with your background you'll be able to find a job, you just won't necessarily appreciate the paycut and lower QOL. Make no mistake about it, PR, particularly in the areas where you'd be able to find a job suitable to your education, has New England cost of living and pays Mississippi wages as a median. It makes financial sense only to the well-funded retiree and the indigent. It is what it is.

Objectively evaluate the reasons for which you wish to relocate to PR. If economic matters are an object to you, as it is to 99% of the population, you're going to be disappointed. In other words, if you wish to pay a premium and give up purchasing power, quality of life and educational opportunities for you and your children, for the subjective benefit of caribbean weather and a different cultural construct than that of the mainland, then PR is for you. Otherwise, you'd be better off saving your money and visiting twice a year, seriously.

Without heavy spanish immersion prior to looking for a therapist job you're going to have a tough time at the workplace. Your customers are spanish speakers, token bilingualism aside. Good luck in your deliberation, and please please please visit the island, away from the tourist holdouts mind you, before committing to any kind of relocation. There's plenty of mainlanders on this board who relocated to the island in search for that 'isla del encanto' and have come to grips with the daily idiosyncrasies of the island and can further elaborate on the eye-opening experience it is.
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Old 12-20-2008, 10:44 AM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
19,578 posts, read 20,363,272 times
Reputation: 50510
Good post hindsight.
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Old 01-01-2009, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
700 posts, read 2,370,939 times
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I 100% agree with the above by hindsight,

It is far more difficult to function in a spanish speaking country as a resident then going down as a vistor for two weeks a giggling while ordering a beer or asking where the bano is.

I lived and worked in PR for quite awhile (In San Juan and in Humacao) and without some broad understanding of Spanish and some friends down there I would have been screwed at work.
Especially for yourself being in the medical field, you couldnt have a "vague" understanding of what this patient said since it is a potentially life threatening mistake you could make. What about reading charts? They wont be doing business in English.

Then what about landlords, banks, bills, laws?? Yes, Spanish is very important.

It can be done, and if you want it, do it! Puerto Ricans for the most part are wonderful people full of life and love. The island is mostly beautiful if you get away from Isla Verde and Av. Ashford. (though I do like those places) They will appreciate your efforts to learn their language (which is subtly different then the Spanish they speak in Mexico btw)

If you have not yet been....Go, it is very important before a move, especially to an island.

Plan, plan, plan then plan some more..PR will be there when you are ready!!

5
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Old 01-02-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
19,578 posts, read 20,363,272 times
Reputation: 50510
Another good post 5chevin5.
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Old 01-02-2009, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 882,902 times
Reputation: 105
I am in the middle of a move to PR. As already stated in the previous posts, planning is very important. Moving is not cheap, and it can cost you easily in the order of $10k. Prices seem to be relative to where I live, but then again I am moving from one of the most expensive place to live in all of US.

Spanish is the prominent language, so it is important to get to know it. I had extensive help from work in the moving process and in getting some initial legal stuff done. Thus far I found that many people do speak English well enough to get stuff done, but you can't depend on it.

Anyways, I am looking forward to the new experience, but also expect a lot of work and effort in order for these experiences to be pleasant.
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Old 01-02-2009, 05:42 PM
 
72 posts, read 172,848 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by InNeedOfAnswers View Post
I am in the middle of a move to PR. As already stated in the previous posts, planning is very important. Moving is not cheap, and it can cost you easily in the order of $10k. Prices seem to be relative to where I live, but then again I am moving from one of the most expensive place to live in all of US.

Spanish is the prominent language, so it is important to get to know it. I had extensive help from work in the moving process and in getting some initial legal stuff done. Thus far I found that many people do speak English well enough to get stuff done, but you can't depend on it.

Anyways, I am looking forward to the new experience, but also expect a lot of work and effort in order for these experiences to be pleasant.
I have been living in PR for over 30 yrs. Now what questions do you need answered??
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Old 01-03-2009, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 882,902 times
Reputation: 105
Thank you for the helping hand ladygrace. For now I think that I am on the right track.
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Old 01-03-2009, 06:41 AM
 
72 posts, read 172,848 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by trying2gettoPR View Post
I really want to move Puerto Rico, I have little or no spanish speaking skills, as of yet. I can order beer, that's about it. I work in the medical field as a Respiratory therapist and I have many specialities within that field, such as sleep studies and pulmonary diagnostic and pulmonary rehab training. What are my possibilities in getting a job in Puerto Rico?
I think you could apply for a job at The VA hospital. You seem very well prepared and since it is a federal instalation you should not be disqualified because of your lack of spanish speaking skills.
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Old 01-03-2009, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 882,902 times
Reputation: 105
While planning the move, I spent about a year on searching for information about PR. What is amazing is the spectrum of opinions and attitudes you will find out there. There are people who will simply vent at PR and hate it completely. There are people who absolutely love it, but do recognize the downsides. I suppose that much of this discrepancy has to do with the income brackets. From what I have seen and from the people whom I spoke to, it is apparent that if you have reasonable income then your live in PR is not all that bad. Obviously not having money is bad no matter where you live. As an external observer and one that has been to few islands around the world, the social and economic climates can go to extremes due to isolation. This is something that one should expect and must get used to.

Another interesting observation that I made is the fact that people who seem to complain about economy and the way things are in PR never suggest how they are contributing to correcting this problem. At the same token, when someone like myself and trying2gettoPR try to move to PR, we are faced with many walls, for example the language. This is ironic, as we are bringing skills, education, and enthusiasm to help the economy and make the place more comfortable for everyone. I don't expect a red carpet upon my arrival, but what I think would be of a benefit to nation like PR is to make it easy for highly skilled people to migrate in. Few examples of easy migration to PR would be to have excise taxes on vehicles that are part of personal goods moved waved or reduced. To have legal forms in English to make the submission process easier, etc. With time I will learn Spanish, and will embrace PR culture, but some incubation interval would be nice
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