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Old 12-19-2018, 12:15 PM
 
11,049 posts, read 4,071,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clip314 View Post
Venezuelans, like Puerto Ricans eat rice n beans. Puerto Rican’s red beans, Venezuelans black. In both places they love fritters, in Caracas corn fritters in PR bacalaitos Fritos. Both nations love salsa, regaton, TV, and CRAVE Miss Universe contests. Both places speak Spanish with a similar accent, except in the Andes. Both are multi-racial nations. Both prefer whites or mixed folks in politics, hardly ever blacks.

Venezuelan upper classes are snobby, just like Ponceños, or folks in Guaynabo. Most of the poor are black or mulatos, like in Puerto Rico. Crime is rampant in both societies. Both societies look down on arrogant uneducated gringos and Nuyoricans no matter their color.

Racism and elitism in Latin countries? NOOOO!!! Jamas! and they have the nerve to criticize the U.S.A.
What you said about Venezuela, you could say about Mexico and the rest of Central and South America. You are not going to see any blacks in high government elected positions.
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Old 12-20-2018, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
39,117 posts, read 48,071,297 times
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My blond, blue eyed son married a Puerto Rican girl, and they warmly welcomed him into the family. He doesn’t speak a lick of Spanish, but he’s a nice guy. The grandmother, whose family came from Spain, was especially glad to have a blond, blue eyed member of the family. Little do they know, that the first thing I thought of was, “Oh goodie, grandchildren that tan.” They want less melatonin, and we want more.
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Old 12-21-2018, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,996 posts, read 37,272,019 times
Reputation: 9618
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Little do they know, that the first thing I thought of was, “Oh goodie, grandchildren that tan.” They want less melatonin, and we want more.
So true! People don't realize the burn/pale/burn/pale conundrum!
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Old 12-24-2018, 04:10 PM
 
14,531 posts, read 6,942,954 times
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I'm half Puerto Rican and lived there for part of my teen years. Also, I'm the lightest one in my family. When I would be out and about with my Dad, people would come up to him and tell him in Spanish how much they liked my complexion. Then they would ask if my mother was PR. He would tell them "no". When we lived stateside, no one ever commented on my complexion so the first time this happened in PR, it was disconcerting.

All that said, whether or not I'm on the Island or the Mainland, when I walk into a place with lots of PRs, I get the stink eye. On the other hand, my brother who is darker than I am, gets lots of Latinos coming up to him and speaking Spanish as he is out and about in his daily life (on the Mainland). It's rare that anyone comes up to me and asks if I speak Spanish.
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Old 12-25-2018, 05:06 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
13,467 posts, read 7,432,503 times
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If they ever become a state, they certainly lose any right whatsoever to ever complain about the presence of "gringos" on their island. As it currently stands, PR is a possession of the USA, but not part of the USA. Because it's a possession of the USA, Americans from the mainland already have the right to go there, speak English if they so please, don't utter a word of Spanish. That's already the case, with the status quo. It would only be amplified and made permanent if they ever became a state. They surely know this, so NEVER take ANY crap from them. You have the RIGHT to be there, if you so choose to exercise it, as an American citizen. Doesn't matter whether you're a blue-eyed, blond northern European American or an English-speaking Black American, etc. The island is our possession (and, reciprocally, Puerto Ricans rightly have unfettered access to the mainland). By RIGHT. We have zero right to complain about Puerto Ricans here, just as they have zero right to complain about us there.

Being an incorporated state in the USA is permanent. You're never getting out, if you decide to go through with it. But we'll all learn to live with it. Eventually, they'll become Anglicized and Americanized, and I don't want hear any complaints about it, because it's pretty much entirely their decision whether they want to become a state.

Last edited by snj90; 12-25-2018 at 05:26 AM..
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Old 01-10-2019, 02:30 PM
 
419 posts, read 117,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snj90 View Post
If they ever become a state, they certainly lose any right whatsoever to ever complain about the presence of "gringos" on their island. As it currently stands, PR is a possession of the USA, but not part of the USA. Because it's a possession of the USA, Americans from the mainland already have the right to go there, speak English if they so please, don't utter a word of Spanish. That's already the case, with the status quo. It would only be amplified and made permanent if they ever became a state. They surely know this, so NEVER take ANY crap from them. You have the RIGHT to be there, if you so choose to exercise it, as an American citizen. Doesn't matter whether you're a blue-eyed, blond northern European American or an English-speaking Black American, etc. The island is our possession (and, reciprocally, Puerto Ricans rightly have unfettered access to the mainland). By RIGHT. We have zero right to complain about Puerto Ricans here, just as they have zero right to complain about us there.

Being an incorporated state in the USA is permanent. You're never getting out, if you decide to go through with it. But we'll all learn to live with it. Eventually, they'll become Anglicized and Americanized, and I don't want hear any complaints about it, because it's pretty much entirely their decision whether they want to become a state.
Tell that to Hawaii.

I'm a Nuyer-gringo from NYC. I have brown hair/blue eyes. I go to PR (shout out to Levittown/Toa Baja/Isabella), Mexico, etc. and in those places I feel welcome and at ease. They assume I'm a local until I open my mouth. When they hear that I'm an outsider I'm often treated with uncommon patience and friendliness. I love Puerto Rico and the people there.

In Hawaii they treat me like an unwelcome outsider. I feel more welcome in Mexican cartel country than in our 50th state. In Hawaii they call white people Haoli (pronounced howlee) and it is never innocuous like the word Gringo. They hate whites with a vengeance over there. Odd thing is they hate blacks equally. Anything in between white and black is ok.
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Old 01-12-2019, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Meredith NH
1,563 posts, read 2,392,144 times
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Lived in PR for two years and love it there...….just don't like the word "gringo".....kind of like the "N" word
Prefer Norte Americano or mainland guy
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Old 01-12-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,222 posts, read 2,131,600 times
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I can definitely vouch for the above comments, I was in PR a month ago and especially now that I´m bilingual and married to a latina (albeit a Colombian woman and not a PRican one), there are no barriers at all. In all of Latin America, I´d say that the more contact there is, the better. If there is a large diaspora such as the one in PR or say the one in Mexico, it usually makes people warmer and more open to North Americans. Less staring, more conversing.

Up front, Puerto Ricans on the island are not weirded out at all by English-only gringos; they´re very accommodating from the beginning. I wasn´t sure though if they would let the bilingual ones into their fold, or if they´d keep them at arms length...I got my answer, and they definitely treat more integrated gringos exactly like they would the locals. The only downside for anyone who wants to learn Spanish or at least improve is that some people, especially in the Metro Area, simply won´t acknowledge your efforts and just go on speaking to you in English no matter what. I think it´s just kind of programmed into the psyche, and it´s best to not take it personally.
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:39 AM
 
14,531 posts, read 6,942,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
I can definitely vouch for the above comments, I was in PR a month ago and especially now that I´m bilingual and married to a latina (albeit a Colombian woman and not a PRican one), there are no barriers at all. In all of Latin America, I´d say that the more contact there is, the better. If there is a large diaspora such as the one in PR or say the one in Mexico, it usually makes people warmer and more open to North Americans. Less staring, more conversing.

Up front, Puerto Ricans on the island are not weirded out at all by English-only gringos; they´re very accommodating from the beginning. I wasn´t sure though if they would let the bilingual ones into their fold, or if they´d keep them at arms length...I got my answer, and they definitely treat more integrated gringos exactly like they would the locals. The only downside for anyone who wants to learn Spanish or at least improve is that some people, especially in the Metro Area, simply won´t acknowledge your efforts and just go on speaking to you in English no matter what. I think it´s just kind of programmed into the psyche, and it´s best to not take it personally.
Per the bolded---This is so true.

My family moved to PR when I was in high school. Growing up, my Dad never spoke to us kids in Spanish. What Spanish I learned, I learned in high school. When we moved there, I had visions of learning enough Spanish to achieve fluency. However, living in the San Juan area, you can't fully immerse yourself in the language. It didn't take me long to realize that in order to become fluent, I would have to live up in the mountains. Of course, I didn't have the opportunity to do so.
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