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Old 01-21-2011, 05:58 AM
 
26 posts, read 106,034 times
Reputation: 49

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LOL....this thread is very entertaining. I agree, part is the Jibaro or the lack of sophistication/education, but a lot has to do with peoples attitude. The majority of people are not ignorant, they know the laws and regulations, they just choose not to obey them. As a matter of fact, if you say you can't do this or that, that makes them do the opposite. Is like the wild west, Puerto Ricans do what they want.....and there will be no repercussions from it. For those who obey the laws, it can be quite shocking, and the lack of enforcement has transformed this attitude as part of the culture.

Until they start enforcing the laws, fining people, etc. you will not see a change in this attitude, best thing is to smile and just say "look what he is getting away with." It is entertaining, and somewhat liberating to see. There is a sense of freedom( you can do whatever you want)so this was what life was, before all the regulations...lol....the wild west. If the government started enforcing the laws, they would have no trouble balancing their budgets.
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Old 01-22-2011, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Dorado, PR
241 posts, read 956,335 times
Reputation: 257
the point is the title of this thread is inconsiderate

Things that happen in PR aren't usually things that can happen only here.
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Old 01-22-2011, 08:37 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,732 posts, read 8,782,353 times
Reputation: 7139
Quote:
Originally Posted by puertoricoistheplace View Post
LOL....this thread is very entertaining. I agree, part is the Jibaro or the lack of sophistication/education, but a lot has to do with peoples attitude. The majority of people are not ignorant, they know the laws and regulations, they just choose not to obey them. As a matter of fact, if you say you can't do this or that, that makes them do the opposite. Is like the wild west, Puerto Ricans do what they want.....and there will be no repercussions from it. For those who obey the laws, it can be quite shocking, and the lack of enforcement has transformed this attitude as part of the culture.

Until they start enforcing the laws, fining people, etc. you will not see a change in this attitude, best thing is to smile and just say "look what he is getting away with." It is entertaining, and somewhat liberating to see. There is a sense of freedom( you can do whatever you want)so this was what life was, before all the regulations...lol....the wild west. If the government started enforcing the laws, they would have no trouble balancing their budgets.
Agreed 100%. Laws and regulations don't seem to be taken seriously in US territories - from what I have heard, all 5 US territories seem to have this problem. Part of it is exactly what you said, because the laws arent enforced. It seems like the only time anything is done is when the Federal government gets involved.
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Old 01-22-2011, 08:39 PM
 
355 posts, read 617,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davsot View Post
the point is the title of this thread is inconsiderate

Things that happen in PR aren't usually things that can happen only here.
I have to agree with davsot, PR doesn't have a monopoly on inconsiderate people, human nature has blessed us with their presence everywhere.
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Old 01-23-2011, 11:24 AM
 
Location: South Georgia
14 posts, read 12,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InNeedOfAnswers View Post
That happens in supermarkets all around the globe. I have seen few solutions in Europe where the shopping cart is equipped with a coin operated lock. The carts are locked and you need a quarter to unlock it. When you take the cart back then you can get your quarter back. I think that this solution would work in PR very well.
They actually do this at some of the ALDI stores in the conUS.
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:57 PM
 
40 posts, read 96,235 times
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El Jibaro is not used to refer to lack of public courtesy. El Jibaro is someone from the countryside that possesses great family values. Your facts are wrong. Also, the rate of College grads in PR surpasses a few states in the U.S.A. http://www.census.gov/prod/2003pubs/c2kbr-24.pdf Puerto Rico may be small but it's filled with big talent. Stop hating!




Quote:
Originally Posted by hindsight2020 View Post
Yes your observations are correct. The closest term I can use to describe the general sentiment of outsiders looking into island day-to-day life out in the streets is what most people in the CONUS have come to understand as 'riff raffy'. That's PR in a nutshell, riff raffy. Common terminology used in the island (to those who actually care to acknowledge their condition...) varies but the term "jíbaro", "jáiba" and "paisano", while properly refering to the late 19th century/early 20th rural class of the island iconized by the sunburned "jíbaro", with his white shirt, strawhat ["páva"] and machete, is currently used to refer to the general lack of public courtesy, traffic behaviors, tone of voice and slang use of spanish while in public, general anti-intellectualism (which CONUS is guilty of as well, no less) and overall rudeness that's exhibited in the island.

Remember, PR is a poor island by Conus standards. Most people are not educated beyond a nominal high school education and those who do have advanced degrees have to adopt the cultural idiosyncrasies of 'riff raff' to survive the day to day. This is to say, it would be futile to exhibit behavior different than the majority, as it would make you a target. Perfect example is traffic. Try and obey traffic laws down there as it pertains to not blocking intersections and see what happens. I'm a native and I almost got lynched on the spot, as a non-native I wouldn't advise it. My fiance was outright shocked when she saw people chasing ambulances to avoid traffic, or even better, watching how people would NOT yield to any emergency vehicles to begin with. Another PR gem is the passing traffic by using the SIDEWALK, two wheels on the road and two wheels on it. Let's see what else, oh yeah "piñas", (spanish for pineapple), which refers to the 5 (at a minimum) vehicles that will pass thru an only turn lane after the red light had already turned red. The gem is in watching the violator cars honking and berating the legal incoming traffic, for having the "nerve" of actually going about their way on their green light. Road rage is a given in riff raff PR. Lines, PR folk consider them optional...been to San Juan international airport lately? Perfect example. Public parks is another one. Sweet Jesus I'm gonna quit while I'm ahead.....

The observation from a previous poster that it's not just an island fever effect is well taken. Orlando, FL has been accused multiple times for having similar ailments attributed to a dramatic increase in first generation Puerto Ricans rubber-band emigrating to-from Orlando and back to the island. Anybody mildly acquainted with the orlando, FL forum in this board can attest to the prevalence of these accusations.

It is what it is. Ever been to the MIA airport AA terminal? You'll see similar dynamics a the Haiti flight gate. It's a caribbean thing. Now comparing PR to the poorest colony in the western hemisphere would be rather hyperbolic on my part, so I'll just say PR is a great place to visit, but a rather crappy place to live, among the reasons is this acceptance and prevalence of a riff raff culture.
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Old 01-24-2011, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Jersey
2,396 posts, read 3,517,721 times
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The shopping cart thing happens everywhere lol. I grew up in NJ and had quite a few Puerto Rican friends and acquitances growing up, and a lot of them indeed didn't give a damn what people thought lol; but the thing is a lot of people in NJ in general are like that and they fit right in!
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Old 01-24-2011, 02:16 PM
 
55,118 posts, read 43,946,306 times
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Some areas just have different cultural "norms".

I doubt the driving in PR is any worse than Italy or other notorious driving countries which also includes Mexico etc.

As for the shopping cart thing, that is arguably just a lack of class and you can see that pretty much anywhere and it manifests itself in any number of ways. Here in the US it might just be the neighbor that likes to fire up his Harley nice and loud at 6AM. (true story).
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Old 01-24-2011, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,226 posts, read 2,133,746 times
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Having driven in both Italy and now driving on a daily basis in PR, I can tell you that Italy is worse. But la isla is pretty damn bad; I catch myself, as someone who got a perfect 100% on the driving test at 16, now driving like a fool when I feel like it. It's just kind of contagious I guess...you see other people do it so you do the same. The Metro area seems to be the worst, but even the countryside has some wild drivers.

The first few weeks I was here, driving somewhere between San German and Yauco I noticed a Dannon Yogurt truck almost slam into 2 cars, back to back, and proceed to repeatedly swerve and almost flip a few more times even though it wasn't avoiding any vehicles. Pretty unnerving to be within 100 feet of a large refrigerated truck and see it go on two wheels. The back door of the truck flung open and several times the contents looked as though they were going to fall out. I finally pass the guy and see that he's been texting this entire time! I know this could happen anywhere, but that was an introduction to how many here see driving here. I stay very alert when I drive, and didn't think twice about paying CAICO the full amount for full coverage!
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Old 01-26-2011, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Dorado, PR
241 posts, read 956,335 times
Reputation: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
Agreed 100%. Laws and regulations don't seem to be taken seriously in US territories - from what I have heard, all 5 US territories seem to have this problem. Part of it is exactly what you said, because the laws arent enforced. It seems like the only time anything is done is when the Federal government gets involved.
Actually, this happens in the States too! Especially with this new movement for reduced federal government and more state power. Take Texas, known for its bad track record in enforcing federal environmental guidelines. It could happen anywhere.
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