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Old 07-15-2011, 02:17 AM
 
1 posts, read 5,918 times
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First of all Moslems would not marry with Christians in Europe and White Spanish Christians would not marry dark Moslems. Isabella expelled Moslems first. Then expelled Jews, then expelled or imprisoned Jews who converted to Christianity under the (Sangre Pura or Pure Blood) law. Puerto Rico was settled by Sephardic Jews who were forced to convert. The Inquisition sent envoys to the Colonies to root out those suspected of practicing Judaism. Many Colonists were burned alive or executed publicly for practicing Judaism. The Vatican released recently their hidden Inquisition files which listed Sephardic Jews by surnames. The names are the common Spanish names we have associated with the people from the Spanish Colonies. Sephardic Jews were originally Middle Eastern Jews who came to Spain and lived there for 1000 years. Many of these expelled Jews were invited to the Ottoman Empire. Spain was the World Power at the time. 50 years after the expulsion, the Ottoman Empire became the world Power.
Note: The Nazis used this Sephardic list of names to identify Jews in Greece, Salonika and the Balkans.
My advice is to check your surname among the many websites which list Sephardic surnames.

Last edited by Sebastianishere; 07-15-2011 at 02:31 AM..
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Old 07-16-2011, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
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The Dominican Republic also received alot of Arabs. It is estimated that over 3,000 Arabs reside in the country and this number keeps increasing. This is not to mention the descendants of Arabs in the DR. I have many family members who look straight Lebanese. Interesting to find out that Puerto Rico went through the same thing. I think Puerto Rico's arab migration was more Spain-related since there was such a large influx of spaniard (many of Arab descent) to PR.
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Old 07-16-2011, 12:32 PM
 
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Lebanese and Syrians settled all over the Caribbean earlier during the last century, especially after World War I and the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. Arab-Haitians and Arab-Cubans are both prominent groups in those countries.
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Old 07-16-2011, 10:56 PM
mym
 
598 posts, read 854,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMario View Post
The Dominican Republic also received alot of Arabs. It is estimated that over 3,000 Arabs reside in the country and this number keeps increasing. This is not to mention the descendants of Arabs in the DR. I have many family members who look straight Lebanese. Interesting to find out that Puerto Rico went through the same thing. I think Puerto Rico's arab migration was more Spain-related since there was such a large influx of spaniard (many of Arab descent) to PR.
i remember reading somewhere that the dr was also one of the few countries to accept jewish refugees preceding ww2
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Old 07-17-2011, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
5,551 posts, read 18,077,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mym View Post
i remember reading somewhere that the dr was also one of the few countries to accept jewish refugees preceding ww2
Correct, they also accepted Japanese.
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Old 09-26-2011, 08:32 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,658 times
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Default Arabesque facial features

I don't think Central Americans,South Americans or Spaniards look Arab or Middle Eastern,just because you have dark hair,skin and eyes does not mean you're Arab or Middle Eastern.I know some Arabs who are really pale and have light brown hair and green eyes,but you can tell they're Arabs because of Arabesque facial feautures.I have yet to see a Puerto Rican with Arabesque facial feautures.[/quote]

Most Central and South American countries have a strong indigenous influence which is why they don't tend to look Middle Eastern. Not all Arab nations have the same features. And you are WRONG about Puerto Ricans not having Arabesque features. My parents are both Puerto Rican and I lived in Tunis, Tunisia because of my Dad's job with the U.N. My family blended in with the locals and I was always mistaken for a Tunisian. When we moved to Spain, it was the same thing only they thought I was from the south of Spain because my skin is a light olive tone. When my Tunisian friend visits NYC, she is always mistaken for a Puerto Rican. So how about that? A large number of the Spaniards who first colonized Puerto Rico were from Andalucia and of course, the Moro influence there was great. However, that is as far as the influence goes in our culture. Neither the language, nor the food have arabic influence...Spanish, African (as in our asopaos and mofongo) and Taino (root vegetables), yes. But in the end, who cares? We're human and that should be enough. With all the intermarriages going on, we'll probably all end up looking the same in the future.
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Old 11-19-2011, 03:44 AM
 
1 posts, read 5,518 times
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OMG, im so glad you posted your blog and ive stumbled across it, because ive been searching for some kind of evidence on this. The puerto rican culture, and all the values it carries are that of the Arab culture and the Arab values. Not todays arab culture though, the old original arab culture. Which has amazed me so much that i had absolutely no doubt the there was more arab blood in puerto ricans than anything else, only i could not prove it. I am positive that facts are hidden away from the world on this issue. please tell us exactly how you did the test and where youve done it God bless you!
by the way there are many puerto ricans who have opened up to the arab culture and realized that they have been following the SAME EXACT culture and this post really helps so thank you so much-

Last edited by Sunscape; 11-19-2011 at 05:46 AM..
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Old 11-19-2011, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Tampa Bay`·.¸¸ ><((((º>.·´¯`·><((((º>
4,533 posts, read 6,772,010 times
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Lluvia> Do you know that some words in PR are the same word in Arabic...like batata, the root that is eaten a lot in the island.
batata is also the word for the same thing in Arabic language!
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Old 11-19-2011, 10:27 AM
 
2,875 posts, read 3,414,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie of Oldsmar View Post
Lluvia> Do you know that some words in PR are the same word in Arabic...like batata, the root that is eaten a lot in the island.
batata is also the word for the same thing in Arabic language!
Given the prefix bata, I was under the impression that "batata" was more of Negro-African origin. As many of us percussion enthusiaists know, a bata is a double sided drum which is normally played while resting on the lap, or while suspended from a shoulder strap. The shape of the bata drum could possibly resemble the shape of a batata.

To my knowledge, the only word that is of Arab origin is the word ojala, which translates into "God willing." If I'm not mistaken, ojala is a mixture of "oj" and "Allah."
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Old 11-19-2011, 03:23 PM
 
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Camisa comes from qamiz, the Arabic word for "shirt." "Aduana" as a term for customs/border controls comes from "al-diwan," which I think meant some kind of revenue agents in the old Islamic world. "Alcalde" to refer to a mayor comes directly from the Arabic word al-qadi, meaning a local official.

I think there are a few hundred Spanish words of Arabic origin. Basically, if a word looks like it has absolutely no relation to Latin, the next-most-likely source is Arabic. Zanahoria, naranja, jarabe, azotea, albondigas, sandia, guitarra, alcantarria, cifra, atalaya, garrido, mezquino, etc.
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