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Old 04-22-2009, 08:38 AM
 
135 posts, read 467,934 times
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Is college tuition cheaper in Puerto Rico? I am torn between going to school here in the States or P.R. Finances are a great issue for me. I would need some form of Financial Aid, Grants, loans, etc. Anyone here go to college (for a master's) in P.R? Any opinions on the schooling for someone who speaks, reads, and writes spanish, but not perfectly. I'm rusty after a lot of years of living with non-speakers. Also what kind of financial help is available if any? Interested in schools only around the San Juan area, willing to travel 22 miles tops.
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Old 04-22-2009, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
32 posts, read 96,967 times
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The college tuition in the University of Puerto Rico are around $50 the credit. There are 11 campus around the island. The principal campuses are Río Piedras (San Juan) and Mayaguez (West of the island). Other campuses near San Juan are Carolina and Bayamón. Here in PR also is available the FAFSA and some other financial aids. The college tuition on others universities, the ones privates, are higher always from $140 per credit.
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Old 04-24-2009, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 883,138 times
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go outside of pr
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Old 04-24-2009, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Scranton
1,384 posts, read 2,800,399 times
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WOW, credits at the UPR are still $50! Fifteen years ago, they were $35. It kinda pisses me off when the students, who are mostly middle class, protest any kind of tuition increase.

The UPR is considered competitive, and at $50/credit, is insanely cheap. Regarding the private universities in San Juan, Sagrado Corazón is also considered competitive. Universidad Interamericana is a notch below the other two, and Universidad Metropolitana should be your last resort.
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Old 07-02-2009, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Centro Tejas
543 posts, read 894,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trucker7 View Post
WOW, credits at the UPR are still $50! Fifteen years ago, they were $35. It kinda pisses me off when the students, who are mostly middle class, protest any kind of tuition increase.

The UPR is considered competitive, and at $50/credit, is insanely cheap. Regarding the private universities in San Juan, Sagrado Corazón is also considered competitive. Universidad Interamericana is a notch below the other two, and Universidad Metropolitana should be your last resort.
You mean, high class pseudo socialist jerks who think US is the worst thing on Earth are the ones who protest against these stupidities. I'm middle class, and I was ok with 50 bucks @ credit unit. Now that I moved to Virginia, a similar public university (like ODU or W&M) cost over $220 dollars every credit unit. Thank God I never spend my GI Bill on a new car!
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
195 posts, read 607,666 times
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Do they have programs to teach mainland Americans spanish prior to attending the Universidads?
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Old 07-06-2009, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 883,138 times
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There are Spanish classes for non-native speakers. Other than that I don't think that there is an organized program to teach you Spanish.
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Old 07-06-2009, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 883,138 times
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I have heard that there are huge protests each time UoPR is trying to take the costs of a credit up. Also, UoPR gets a huge chunk of money from the local government (relatively speaking of course). Supposedly the role of the U is to be a service university to the island, hence it should be affordable. This very notion is a cause of lack of motivation for the students. Many have more than one major and don't have a focus taking course just to take them. In my opinion the role of a university is to prepare students for reality and teach them to be career driven. Also, does the island with its limited economy really need so many people with a bachelor degree?
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Old 07-07-2009, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Centro Tejas
543 posts, read 894,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InNeedOfAnswers View Post
I have heard that there are huge protests each time UoPR is trying to take the costs of a credit up.
Also, does the island with its limited economy really need so many people with a bachelor degree?
1. Like I said earlier, the only ones who go on strike because of that are the pseudo socialist idiots who think US is evil, and see Cuba and Venezuela as a paradise, and are very wealthy (they complain that if the tuition raises, they won't be able to keep on shopping designer labels at Condado; I know that because I once dated one of those jerks). Lower income people (who attend college thanks to grants and scholarships) do not complain that much; they have a bigger desire of getting ahead than wealthy students and are willing to pay more if that's necessary.

2. People don't go to college just to land in jobs, but because learning help us to become better people. Ah, in PR, the people who have permanent jobs are the ones with bachelors and masters. That's why going to college is so important; survival of the smartest. Both of my parents (they're divorced, but they both had our custody) have bachelors from Puerto Rican universities and have permanent jobs. If you don't find a job in PR with a bachelors, move. Like my uncles.
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Old 07-08-2009, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Puerto Rico
177 posts, read 883,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jay_jay26 View Post
2. People don't go to college just to land in jobs, but because learning help us to become better people. Ah, in PR, the people who have permanent jobs are the ones with bachelors and masters. That's why going to college is so important; survival of the smartest. Both of my parents (they're divorced, but they both had our custody) have bachelors from Puerto Rican universities and have permanent jobs. If you don't find a job in PR with a bachelors, move. Like my uncles.
I am afraid that the university is set up to operate as a socialist organization. How can university promote and teach entrepreneurship and innovation when itself it is bound by artificial rules to scorn these very ideals.
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