U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
 [Register]
U.S. Territories Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands, etc.
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-31-2009, 11:00 AM
 
4 posts, read 27,980 times
Reputation: 11

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
The answer is actually yes in many cases. If you kept up with the local news you would know that there has been a substantial increase in arrests and successful prosecutions in the last year both where recent crimes and older cases are concerned.
Not really true, you need to get your facts straight and stop trying to make people think they are safe in the USVI because they are not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-31-2009, 11:06 AM
 
4 posts, read 27,980 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandhillian View Post
Well, I am glad that some natives/persons who have lived a long time in the locale, such as yourself, contribute since it is helpful to have both perspectives. One can relate what it was like to be an outsider coming in and the other can give a historical perspective and provide information about issues that newbies such as myself would never otherwise know about. I just see a difference between objecting to the content of someone's posting and the fact that they are posting.
Please as far as the native virgin islanders think you will always be an outsider
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 07:55 PM
 
3 posts, read 16,472 times
Reputation: 10
Can anyone give me information on a man known as Blayke Lee Wright. He is from Hospital Grounds, VI. I believe he ran a photography studio there.This is important to a group of people. He ran a website/chat forum that we were all members of. He has important info on us and our children.On July 23 he was arrested for using a stolen identity of a SD 15 year old girl.It is important that we find out information about who this man reallly was.Tried to contact the newspaper but did not receive an answer.Can anyone direct me as to where to look and find out if he is still in jail and if he did indeed steal this girls identity?Thank You!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 08:46 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 60,641,599 times
Reputation: 26569
Have you tried calling the VIPD? The number to connect to all departments is 340-774-2211 and the number for the Chief of Police is 340-774-3868.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2009, 05:19 PM
 
3 posts, read 16,472 times
Reputation: 10
We called the police and they hung up on me. Totally baffles me that no information can be found in such a small place. After all he lived there for 11 years and was a well known photographer. Oh well, thanks anyway!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2009, 06:51 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 60,641,599 times
Reputation: 26569
I know several photographers here but his name is totally unfamiliar. Did you try calling the office of the Chief of Police directly?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2009, 07:19 PM
 
3 posts, read 16,472 times
Reputation: 10
We were not able to reach him today.

The only other information that I do have is that his daughter is named Moderator cut: name remove and she is 5 years old. From what he tells us she is well known with the locals and could often be seen hanging out outside his shop.

To tell you the truth we are not really sure how much truth their is in anything that he told us. But he definitely was using the name Blayke.

Last edited by Keeper; 08-13-2009 at 03:12 PM.. Reason: name of daughter removed
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2009, 08:31 AM
 
6,011 posts, read 7,071,349 times
Reputation: 740
Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
The problem with those CIA stats is that altough over 16% of the population speaks Spanish, there is no mention of the percentage of Hispanic in the racial category. It appears to overlap with other racial groups. In terms of economics, there are so many different methods of measuring economic development...I am not an economists. Third, the CIA data does not break down by island.
why would hispaniv be used as a racial group lol it isnt one maybe in the US
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2009, 02:05 PM
 
5 posts, read 13,963 times
Reputation: 12
sdog74:

In response to your post of July 4th-
You are smart in researching your move before you make it. The USVI moving center is a great resource to use as quoted by "STT Resident". It doesn't give you all you need to know, but is a great resource.
Important things to know: don't be fooled by the "US" part of the "VI" name. Technically, you are in the US, but in my opinion, it is most definitely not living in America. (Which can be a good, bad or neutral thing depending on what you are looking for, your attitude etc.)

Cost of living will be a shocker, even on your income. You can read the stats, but it doesn't quite have the same effect you will feel when you pay your first grocery or power bill (for example).

Coffee beans are a good example of high prices, since you mentioned it. Example: I recently noticed (and took a photo with my camera phone for proof) that a typical 12oz bag of Starbucks Breakfast Blend had a price tag of $22.00 (not a mistake) at a certain grocery store on STT. This is the most expensive I've seen it on island, but wanted use that example to illustrate 2 points: 1) For the most part food and food items cost at least 50%-100% than in the States and 2) You have to go to different places for the best prices/ quality on certain food items. If you are frugal or morally opposed to paying $22.00 for a 12 oz bag of beans, for example, you eventually learn that Store A ( a small market) on one end of the island may be the best place for quality meat, while Store B) (a large price club somewhat like Sam's) may be the best place to buy coffee beans for less, or Store C (K-mart, for example) may have the best price on bulk paper towels. Shopping smart can be far more time (and dollar)-consuming than most mainlanders are accustomed to with the likes of super Wal-Marts and price competing grocery chains on every corner. Doing this on weekends is especially time-consuming, but if it can be accomplished weekdays, it saves time. Most islanders get their routine figured out and have a good plan as to which stores to go to when and for what. My advice is that it just takes more planning unless you have an unlimited food budget or plan to eat out often.

If you are a coffee aficionado, my best suggestion is to buy beaucoups of your preferred beans and ship them down to yourself (be certain to insure it) or have relatives/ friends send them to you or bring them down in suitcases when they come to visit you from the States. This is what my husband and I do.

As for fast internet, we have found that the most economical, relatively "fast" and convenient internet access method is to get a wireless aircard for your laptop- we have been pleased with Sprint, but I believe AT &T may also offer the same service there. It is not DSL in the States, but has served us very well (as long as you are not in a cellular blackout area).

Costs and modern conveniences aside, I would recommend that you plan very carefully before uprooting "permanently". Culturally, things are very, very different than the mainland. How you are accepted does depend a great deal on your attitude, but even non-natives may be reluctant to "accept" you as a long-timer because as others have said, the attrition rate for newbies is high, and there are definitely a lot of complex reasons for it. I wouldn't say it is solely tied into professional couples with babies on the way, though. I've seen quite a few baby boomers and retirees settle, only to realize that the health care they hope to have or already need just may not be available. I've also seen plenty of folks come to the island thinking they don't need a car, then buying a clunker after their first few weeks or leaving island just a few months later once they realize that "simple" tasks like grocery shopping, laundry, or errand running can be all-consuming of your time without your own transportation.

Just some thoughts/ opinions/ suggestions from my own perspective of living here (I've lived in several US States and several foreign countries in my lifetime before moving to the VI, and I firmly feel that moving to the USVI is far more like moving to a foreign country than from one US State to another. Best of luck to you!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2009, 04:24 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,192 times
Reputation: 10
There's some truth in most of these postings, in my opinion. I've lived on St. Croix for 10 years after living in New York City for 20. There is crime - it is very difficult finding official crime statistics for comparisons. Most (but not all) murders seem to be youth and drug related. Muggings or other thefts are not uncommon - one must take care especially in certain areas, as is true in most locales. Costs of living are very high. Utilities are sporadic. Many locals may be rude, but an effort to be nice, especially saying "good morning" etc is usually very helpful. Public schools are poor. The government seem to be a perpetual joke and sideshow although the current governor seems more effective than some. Health care is spotty although a new cardiac center at the hospital seems to be a positive step. On the positive side, it is beautiful and warm. I live in a condo with a generator so power outages are not a problem and no insects or other unwanted life-forms share my dwelling. Many locals are pleasant and industrious and quite willing to respond to courteous behavior. Turtles nest on our condo beach, sugar birds squabble outside the window and hummingbirds visit the terrace flowers. Living here can be wonderful, but people who are quick to anger at perceived slights don't do well. I've never regretted moving here, but I agree that a stay of a few months gives a much better picture than a brief vacation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > U.S. Territories
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top