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Old 05-24-2011, 10:48 AM
 
3,207 posts, read 3,606,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unPescador View Post
The amount of roadside trash in Puerto Rico is a blight, it's everywhere and it's awful. The word "littering" doesn't quite describe it. It's roadside dumping. Even the most beautiful place will often have trash, so disappointing. There's no answer for the islands large population, waste to energy is the answer to the land-fill problem but the roadside trash can stop. It's a learned practice-behavior. Why it began I can't say but I would think an island wide public / environmental campaign, billboards, television, schools etc.. would change the practice throwing trash from your cars and public dumping from tolerated to unacceptable. It would take a few years but it's definitely doable. The same thing was needed on the mainland in the '60's and it worked.

As far as the opposition to waste to energy Chacho can probably answer why there has been resistance to it. Political, financial ...?
There are no government lead campaigns to raise public awareness against littering. It seems like most people have grown accustomed to seeing trash all around them. It's become an "acceptable" nuisance of everyday life.

There are two main reasons why Waste-to-Energy (WTE) has been ressisted in Puerto Rico. Firstly, WTE has been made into a sort of "boogy man" (el cuco) by well meaning, yet mostly uninformed people. Sadly, those who oppose WTE offer no viable alternative solution to counter Puerto Rico's waste management dilemma.

Secondly, in Puerto Rico, those politicians who've sided in favor of WTE have gained zero political points, and in most cases they've lost political points. As a result, most politicians chose to not get involved in the issue. I know this personally given my involvement in WTE since 1988.
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Old 05-24-2011, 12:20 PM
 
355 posts, read 638,005 times
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I truly believe that a gov't sponsored campaign ( all media ) in co-operation with both public and private schools would change the trash problem within a generation.
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Old 05-24-2011, 02:13 PM
 
3,207 posts, read 3,606,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unPescador View Post
I truly believe that a gov't sponsored campaign ( all media ) in co-operation with both public and private schools would change the trash problem within a generation.
I agree 100% with your idea. What can YOU do to get the campaign started?
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Old 05-24-2011, 07:35 PM
 
355 posts, read 638,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
I agree 100% with your idea. What can YOU do to get the campaign started?
Good question, everything starts somewhere.
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Old 05-28-2011, 12:12 AM
 
3 posts, read 11,155 times
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I guess I have to put my two cents. I was born in Puerto Rico but raised in the states. I returned to e island with wife and two kids in 1980 and moved back to the states in 2001. Puerto Rico seems to a poster child for how not to create a community. Bad politicians--which the people keep sending back , good or bad, almost all related to political status that looks like will not be resolved in our lifetimes.

I believe the reason for the crazy drivers, garbage and many other social ills is due a culture that has changed from country friendliness to urban free for all. Most people are friendly and courteous in their homes and work but act totally different in their cars and to the environment. Interesting that at least one previous Governor, Hernandez Colon, requested the Federal Government turn over the management of the El Yunque Rain Forest to Puerto Rico. they denied it not wishing to see what happened to previous turnovers, Culebra Island for example.

Lastly, our Island has an identity crisis that cannot be easily cured. Just in this forum there are very divergent views on aspects that should not be difficult to agree on. The reason is simple, regardless of any negatives, our people are very proud of their island and will defend it in spite of the numerous issues. Not a bad thing but may be another reason why the culture is not changing to better future generations.
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Old 05-28-2011, 12:04 PM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,801 posts, read 9,070,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raulzap View Post
I guess I have to put my two cents. I was born in Puerto Rico but raised in the states. I returned to e island with wife and two kids in 1980 and moved back to the states in 2001. Puerto Rico seems to a poster child for how not to create a community. Bad politicians--which the people keep sending back , good or bad, almost all related to political status that looks like will not be resolved in our lifetimes.

I believe the reason for the crazy drivers, garbage and many other social ills is due a culture that has changed from country friendliness to urban free for all. Most people are friendly and courteous in their homes and work but act totally different in their cars and to the environment. Interesting that at least one previous Governor, Hernandez Colon, requested the Federal Government turn over the management of the El Yunque Rain Forest to Puerto Rico. they denied it not wishing to see what happened to previous turnovers, Culebra Island for example.

Lastly, our Island has an identity crisis that cannot be easily cured. Just in this forum there are very divergent views on aspects that should not be difficult to agree on. The reason is simple, regardless of any negatives, our people are very proud of their island and will defend it in spite of the numerous issues. Not a bad thing but may be another reason why the culture is not changing to better future generations.
I agree with you, Puerto Rico is the prime example of how not to run a dependent territory. US territories in general have far too much local control, and not enough federal involvement. As I have said in previous posts, we could do alot to learn from the British approach regarding how they govern and administer British overseas territories while still allowing a large degree of self government.
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Old 06-05-2011, 05:20 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brahms View Post
I visited PR last year, stayed in Rincon, and found the entire Island to be an overpopulated, traffic-laden, garbage pit. I visited the fort and was shocked at the slums that reside directly next-door -that slum area was as bad as one finds in Brazil. What is keeping that place from descending into chaos? - oh, my taxable income of course. Another paradise ruined by the slave trade. Ever wonder why Hawaii is nice and PR is a dump? Its the natives - or lack thereof I should say.
Brahms. Wow. Have you ever even been to Hawaii? Or Brazil for that matter? And please research before making comments about taxable income because those who work in Puerto Rico DO pay federal taxes. And just as in Hawaii there are many nice areas in Puerto Rico as well as poor areas. I have been to both and have seen the best and worse of both. I am born and raised in NYC residing in PR now and what you are commenting is so untrue it is laughable. Jesus Christ I hate when people make unfounded and unintelligent comments about a place they visited for a week or so.
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Old 06-07-2011, 06:27 PM
 
37 posts, read 106,486 times
Reputation: 58
Wrote this on another thread, fits here too.

Quote:
I think this thread is damaging and makes Puerto Rico look like a place where violence occures and that's all there is to it.

Look, Puerto Rico does have a problem with violent crime, moreso than the U.S.A. in general (bad comparison considering the size, population, socioeconomic and cultural difference) but this is due to a number of reasons.

-Drug entry point, enough said. This alone enhances the drug trade significantly. More lucrative, more drugs, more of a gamble, more to loose. Often ends in bodies laying on the street in the casarios.

-Lack of professional jobs due to overpopulation. The island is overpopulated not necessarily due to the number of people but poor urban planning and lack of corporate investment in terms of high tech jobs.

-High disparity, will exist in a capitalist society but incubated by the fact Puerto Rico has limited jobs.

-The culture encourages aggression. It's true. Machoism.

Instead of dwelling on murders, the past, why not create a thread on preventing those factors that cause the murders in the first place?

I want to see threads about: Infrastructure improvements, new urbanism in P.R., education, reducing pollution and saving resources (green), new industries, and improvements to tourist areas, both natural preservation for areas like El Yunque and redevelopment like what's planned in Old San Juan.

These murders are the past, focus on the future.
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Old 06-08-2011, 12:41 AM
 
3,207 posts, read 3,606,299 times
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The problem is much deeper and much more serious than most Boricuas care to admit. Please, for each and every Boricua who lives on the island, or whom aspires to return there eventually, you have a duty to read the following article carefully and meticulously. This is serious business which should not be overlooked or taken lightly.

caribbeanbusiness.pr - The real story behind Puerto Rico’s low 40.6% labor-participation rate
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Old 06-12-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
3,298 posts, read 3,968,509 times
Reputation: 6657
Here is the latest article from Caribbean Business: Puerto Rico's Broken Economy...How To Fix It. Excellent reading.

CARIBBEAN BUSINESS Plan for the Economic Development of PR

Regards
Gemstone1
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