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Old 03-25-2010, 05:37 PM
 
154 posts, read 448,072 times
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Dior:

Thanks for the clarification on both issues. Very helpful to all of us.
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Old 04-27-2010, 08:05 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
3,814 posts, read 11,175,882 times
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Default Resistance Building to Christie's UI Restructuring

Resistance continues to build against Governor Chris Christie's proposal to reduce unemployment benefits as a way to avoid a hefty tax increase for New Jersey businesses. The Communications Workers of America, the largest state employees union in New Jersey, called the proposed reduction in the maximum weekly benefit "disgusting."

The biggest obstacle to the passage of the Republican-sponsored legislation remains the Democratic-controlled Legislature.

A spokesman for Senate President Stephen Sweeney noted that New Jersey is one of only three states that also requires employees to contribute to the unemployment fund. As such, workers should be able to count on the fund as a lifeline. Senate Majority Leader Barbara Buono (D-Middlesex) adds that, "There’s no support in the Senate for any of the proposals that have been put forth in the Pennacchio [unemployment restructuring] bill."

As an alternative, Democratic State Senators are offering a bill that maintains the current UI benefits, but also reduces by one-half the tax increase now scheduled for New Jersey businesses in the next fiscal year.

N.J. lawmakers work to fix $1.7B unemployment fund deficit, avert 52 percent tax hike for businesses | - NJ.com
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Old 04-28-2010, 06:43 AM
 
154 posts, read 448,072 times
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Does anyone know what happens in NJ to EB come July? Christie has made noise about ending the EB program completely unless it is 100% federally funded. Does anyone know if such a decision can be made solely by Christie, or does he have to get the NJ legislature to vote on it as well?
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Old 04-28-2010, 08:13 AM
 
18 posts, read 39,709 times
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When do the bloated beurocrats stop selecting the least abled to increase contributions to the machine? What justifies highlighting the segment of people that can least afford to have less while the "fat cats" receive more? This governor earned over 5million last year and I am sure it was not all paid to him for what he contributed and what about the crumbs that fell underneath the table of his election? I for one am tired of having the middle class represented by the upper class and follow the "rule of law" that they apply to us.
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Old 04-28-2010, 11:08 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
3,814 posts, read 11,175,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onestep4ward View Post
Does anyone know what happens in NJ to EB come July? Christie has made noise about ending the EB program completely unless it is 100% federally funded. Does anyone know if such a decision can be made solely by Christie, or does he have to get the NJ legislature to vote on it as well?
EB and High EB are "triggered on" in New Jersey by three-month average unemployment rates -- at least 6% for EB, at least 8% for High EB. EB will be "triggered off" when the three-month average unemployment rate drops below those levels. To discontinue EB any other way will require an act of law by the New Jersey State Legislature.

In New Jersey, when EB is triggered on, its funding has been traditional 50% state/50% federal -- except for those periods when federal legislation provides 100% funding. Federal funding always supersedes state funding.

When the federal funding of 100% expires (June 2, 2010), in NJ EB funding automatically reverts to the 50% state/50% federal funding. As long as the three-month average unemployment rate triggers are met in New Jersey, under state law EB must still be provided.

Because of the enormous deficit in the NJ State Unemployment Insurance Fund, in the next fiscal year (starting July 1) taxes for NJ businesses will jump by more than 50%.

To avoid hiking those taxes, NJ Governor Chris Christie has proposed numerous changes in the unemployment laws in the state. These include changing the law governing EB -- making EB dependent on the three-month average unemployment rates and 100% federal funding. These are the requirements in many other states, which discontinue EB when the 100% federal funding expires.

At this time, Christie has no support in the New Jersey State Legislature for making any changes in the state's unemployment laws.
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Old 04-28-2010, 11:26 AM
 
154 posts, read 448,072 times
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DiorGirl:
Thank you! Who's the BEST?
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Old 04-28-2010, 11:46 AM
 
Location: NW Georgia.
285 posts, read 520,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diorgirl View Post
EB and High EB are "triggered on" in New Jersey by three-month average unemployment rates -- at least 6% for EB, at least 8% for High EB. EB will be "triggered off" when the three-month average unemployment rate drops below those levels. To discontinue EB any other way will require an act of law by the New Jersey State Legislature.

In New Jersey, when EB is triggered on, its funding has been traditional 50% state/50% federal -- except for those periods when federal legislation provides 100% funding. Federal funding always supersedes state funding.

When the federal funding of 100% expires (June 2, 2010), in NJ EB funding automatically reverts to the 50% state/50% federal funding. As long as the three-month average unemployment rate triggers are met in New Jersey, under state law EB must still be provided.

Because of the enormous deficit in the NJ State Unemployment Insurance Fund, in the next fiscal year (starting July 1) taxes for NJ businesses will jump by more than 50%.

To avoid hiking those taxes, NJ Governor Chris Christie has proposed numerous changes in the unemployment laws in the state. These include changing the law governing EB -- making EB dependent on the three-month average unemployment rates and 100% federal funding. These are the requirements in many other states, which discontinue EB when the 100% federal funding expires.

At this time, Christie has no support in the New Jersey State Legislature for making any changes in the state's unemployment laws.


I haven't read all the post, But it does seem like Gov Christie is at least trying to do something for the people of his state, Same with Fla. Wish i could say the same about here. Makes me want to leave the south and become a Yankee.
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Old 04-28-2010, 12:12 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
3,814 posts, read 11,175,882 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAID OFF & WORRIED N GA View Post


I haven't read all the post, But it does seem like Gov Christie is at least trying to do something for the people of his state, Same with Fla. Wish i could say the same about here. Makes me want to leave the south and become a Yankee.
The unemployed in New Jersey would not agree with you. Christie wants to cut the maximum weekly unemployment benefit by $50, he wants to add a one-week waiting period before you receive your first unemployment payment, he wants to eliminate EB if the federal government does not provide 100% funding -- and, if he succeeds in changing the state unemployment insurance laws, New Jersey unemployed will no longer qualify for the weekly $25 FAC payment.

These are all losses for the unemployed where there have been no signs of job recovery -- only continued job eliminations.

But the Governor needs the approval of the New Jersey State legislature to do any of that -- and to date they have been staunchly opposed to these changes.
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Old 04-28-2010, 12:17 PM
 
149 posts, read 319,807 times
Reputation: 67
Gov. Christie won't get elected to another term in New Jersey. This guy is screwing up seriously.

Good luck to New Jersey's Unemployed in finding a good paying job.
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Old 04-28-2010, 12:17 PM
 
36 posts, read 80,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onestep4ward View Post
Dior:

Thanks for the clarification on both issues. Very helpful to all of us.
yes ditto that thanks!
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