U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Unexplained Mysteries and Paranormal
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-30-2018, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,833 posts, read 4,534,261 times
Reputation: 11110

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
What is interesting about that second link is that, even if science can recreate these Tasmanian tigers, that they might not survive in the wild.

On the other hand, should all the searches prove that there are some still out there; then there would be a good chance of reintroduction.
Whether reintroduction would work depends I think on availability of thylacine habitat; animals and plants occupy an ecological "niche" comprising variables like time of activity (thylacines are/were I believe nocturnal, hunting mostly at dusk and dawn), nourishment requirements (some species of animal specialize on a specific food source, others are more generalists), location within the habitat (in a rain forest for example, some animals live in the underbrush, some in the lower canopy, some in the upper canopy), nature of the habitat (the red winged blackbird here in the U.S. prefer reedy marshes, for example, where they cling to the stems of the reeds and cattails), etc. Also, competition: From my environmental sciences days, there's a theory or law that states if two species occupy the same exact ecological niche, either one will go extinct or one will modify its requirements to reduce competition with the other species.

So human activities have reduced the thylacine habitat significantly or there is a competitive predator in that habitat that wasn't there thousands of years ago, they may not be able to survive reintroduction as a breeding population. According to several articles I've read, thylacine habitats probably included dry eucalyptus forests, wetlands, and grasslands - given that and their food sources, dingoes obviously presented a real competitive threat to them. Which means that (sadly) thylacines would survive only if we maintained them in controlled habitats like those found in zoos and wildlife preserves.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-30-2018, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
17,920 posts, read 14,177,640 times
Reputation: 13778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
Whether reintroduction would work depends I think on availability of thylacine habitat; animals and plants occupy an ecological "niche" comprising variables like time of activity (thylacines are/were I believe nocturnal, hunting mostly at dusk and dawn), nourishment requirements (some species of animal specialize on a specific food source, others are more generalists), location within the habitat (in a rain forest for example, some animals live in the underbrush, some in the lower canopy, some in the upper canopy), nature of the habitat (the red winged blackbird here in the U.S. prefer reedy marshes, for example, where they cling to the stems of the reeds and cattails), etc. Also, competition: From my environmental sciences days, there's a theory or law that states if two species occupy the same exact ecological niche, either one will go extinct or one will modify its requirements to reduce competition with the other species.

So human activities have reduced the thylacine habitat significantly or there is a competitive predator in that habitat that wasn't there thousands of years ago, they may not be able to survive reintroduction as a breeding population. According to several articles I've read, thylacine habitats probably included dry eucalyptus forests, wetlands, and grasslands - given that and their food sources, dingoes obviously presented a real competitive threat to them. Which means that (sadly) thylacines would survive only if we maintained them in controlled habitats like those found in zoos and wildlife preserves.



Which is what I thought might be the case considering that second link you posted. Genetics can only help so much without the help of man and nature!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2018, 12:11 PM
 
19,291 posts, read 25,898,238 times
Reputation: 37433
wont be long til we can place a rich mans head on a younger body...… this will be the ethical debate years from now....

imagine an old rich white guys head on a younger black mans body …."he's" 72 yrs old in the head...but trying out for the nba..

would make a great movie...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2018, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,833 posts, read 4,534,261 times
Reputation: 11110
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
imagine an old rich white guys head on a younger black mans body …."he's" 72 yrs old in the head...but trying out for the nba..
"Doctors are forced to transplant the head of a dying, racist surgeon onto the body of a black death row inmate. "

The Thing With Two Heads (1972), starring Ray Milland as the racist and Rosie Greer as the death row inmate.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069372/
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2018, 04:29 AM
 
Location: PRC
4,582 posts, read 4,063,627 times
Reputation: 4079
I dont think we realise how much this will effect our future because we will have a 2-tier society.

As soon as genetics can accurately diagnose people with genetic diseases or potential ones, we will immediately have insurance companies, governments, banks, etc requiring a genetic profile before they will accept us.

The rich will be able to access the services and the poor will be denied.
The rich will want their kids to be genetically altered to be smarter, healthier, prettier.
The rich will want to live forever, to run their companies forever, to control the world forever.

The person who controls the organisations who have the say in genetic manipulation will rule the world.

There are already companies like Monsanto which are buying up the seed banks of the world.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2018, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
17,920 posts, read 14,177,640 times
Reputation: 13778
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocpaul20 View Post
I dont think we realise how much this will effect our future because we will have a 2-tier society.

As soon as genetics can accurately diagnose people with genetic diseases or potential ones, we will immediately have insurance companies, governments, banks, etc requiring a genetic profile before they will accept us.

The rich will be able to access the services and the poor will be denied.
The rich will want their kids to be genetically altered to be smarter, healthier, prettier.
The rich will want to live forever, to run their companies forever, to control the world forever.

The person who controls the organisations who have the say in genetic manipulation will rule the world.

There are already companies like Monsanto which are buying up the seed banks of the world.

These are questions for the Politics and Controversial subjects forum. They are good questions about the future of mankind and that is not even figuring in the coming Singularity.

Right now the world is waiting news of the first extinct mammoth that is reborn with one of our current Asian elephants as it's mother or even an artificial womb: (https://www.theguardian.com/science/...ion-scientists). Some lab, someplace, will accomplish that in our near future. Where would we allow these huge creatures to live is another question? Some were about the size of our current elephants; but some could weigh twice as much with the Wooly Mammoth the largest. Jurassic World comes to mind but it is hard to predict the future.

The reintroduction of thylacines is a little more difficult lacking a good surrogate mother. The artificial womb could change that.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2018, 09:32 AM
 
14,155 posts, read 7,034,794 times
Reputation: 27386
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidt1 View Post
Millions of species have become extinct since long ago. Perhaps that is the way of nature.
It wasn't nature that killed off the Thylacine. It was selfish short sighted people that couldn't tolerate another species living near them. They were poisoned and shot by the thousands until none were left.



Personally I would love to see them brought back. It would be correcting a huge wrong that was done and not all that long ago.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2018, 09:35 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
8,643 posts, read 10,543,828 times
Reputation: 13313
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotkarl View Post
I believe they are still around. I really hope so.
At least more probable than bigfoot.
If they are still around why has nobody seen a dead one anywhere?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2018, 09:39 AM
 
14,155 posts, read 7,034,794 times
Reputation: 27386
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
These are questions for the Politics and Controversial subjects forum. They are good questions about the future of mankind and that is not even figuring in the coming Singularity.

Right now the world is waiting news of the first extinct mammoth that is reborn with one of our current Asian elephants as it's mother or even an artificial womb: (https://www.theguardian.com/science/...ion-scientists). Some lab, someplace, will accomplish that in our near future. Where would we allow these huge creatures to live is another question? Some were about the size of our current elephants; but some could weigh twice as much with the Wooly Mammoth the largest. Jurassic World comes to mind but it is hard to predict the future.

The reintroduction of thylacines is a little more difficult lacking a good surrogate mother. The artificial womb could change that.
The reintroduction of thylacines is actually quite a bit easier. They are marsupials and probably the size of a bean when they are born. All they need to do is latch onto a good milk source in a protected environment like an artificial pouch. It's smaller relative the Tasmanian Devil is still around.
Also their environment still exists in Tasmania. There is plenty of wild space there for them to be reintroduced.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-02-2018, 09:47 AM
 
14,155 posts, read 7,034,794 times
Reputation: 27386
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
If they are still around why has nobody seen a dead one anywhere?
That's disputable. There are a few reports every year of people still seeing them but their numbers would be so few that a dead body would be extremely hard to find before it's gone.
This article is from 2016.
New footage of a Tasmanian Tiger emerges that has experts optimistic | Daily Mail Online

There's other footage and photos as well that "experts" aren't able to dismiss. If they aren't thylacines then they must be a new species that no on has previously recorded. They certainly aren't dogs by appearance and movement.

Last edited by marino760; 09-02-2018 at 10:28 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Unexplained Mysteries and Paranormal

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top