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Old 09-02-2018, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
The reintroduction of thylacines is actually quite a bit easier. They are marsupials and probably the size of a bean when they are born. All they need to do is latch onto a good milk source in a protected environment like an artificial pouch. It's smaller relative the Tasmanian Devil is still around.
Also their environment still exists in Tasmania. There is plenty of wild space there for them to be reintroduced.

Besides man; dogs were also introduced to the mainland and that was also a contributing factor in their demise: https://www.australiangeographic.com...the-same-time/ (Vasily originally posted that link). While much of Tasmania is still very wild; they do have some fair size cities and I, would presume, they also introduced dogs to the island.

The original link goes into more detail on how difficult it would be to recreate a dead species. They also talk about the destruction of the very forest that was once their home. Even though there is still some space and more food available; there could still be problems. The YouTube video does explain a lot of it.
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Old 09-02-2018, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
17,815 posts, read 14,109,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
If they are still around why has nobody seen a dead one anywhere?

They do have some very ambitious projects to prove that they are still around. One study supposedly placed over 500 trail cameras. Of course, the problem with ambitious studies, is that we would expect a quick confirmation that they are still around. The longer the study goes on, with that king of coverage, the greater the chance that they will never find one.

PS I have to wonder if anybody ever placed that many cameras looking for Big Foot? Just curious.
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Old 09-02-2018, 12:24 PM
 
14,126 posts, read 6,984,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
They do have some very ambitious projects to prove that they are still around. One study supposedly placed over 500 trail cameras. Of course, the problem with ambitious studies, is that we would expect a quick confirmation that they are still around. The longer the study goes on, with that king of coverage, the greater the chance that they will never find one.

PS I have to wonder if anybody ever placed that many cameras looking for Big Foot? Just curious.
Other than a dead body or one caught alive, there will be no definitive proof that it still exists. Anyone can dismiss footage from a trail camera especially if the photo is taken at night.

This video has been shown before. If this isn't a thylacine than what could it be? No dog has a straight tail that doesn't wag or move up nor down and is 3/4 of it's body length. It's gate is also unique as it seems to favor one leg and then the other and then neither.

Is this incredible footage appearing to show 'extinct' Tasmanian Tiger running through fields in Victoria proof that the Thylacine still exists? | Daily Mail Online
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Old 09-02-2018, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
It wasn't nature that killed off the Thylacine. It was selfish short sighted people that couldn't tolerate another species living near them. They were poisoned and shot by the thousands until none were left.
Not exactly. They were in serious trouble as a species by the time the bounty was put on their heads. See my earlier post here and the linked articles:

//www.city-data.com/forum/52950269-post9.html

Repeating my quote from the earlier post:

Quote:
[G]rowing scientific evidence reveals a complex tapestry of forces involved in their decline. Among these are competition with dogs, habitat loss and changing fire regimes leading to population fragmentation, and an epidemic disease that spread through the population in the 1920s.
In other words, the bounty was the final blow to a species that was likely to become extinct even without ranchers shooting them.
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Old 09-02-2018, 12:31 PM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I am starting off with this link to the quest to genetically engineer the thylacine and the effort to reintroduce it back into the wild. Here is a link to a long, but well produced, story about that quest:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhlY-j8JPeg

For those that do not have 48 minutes to watch a great video here is an article about the quest to
reintroduce the animal: https://www.news.com.au/technology/s...b5153e2c2c07e7.

At the same time as they are trying to use science to recreate the animal; we also have a very active investigations into the possibility that they were never extinct: https://www.news.com.au/technology/s...b94654a50f5862. The problem I do have with many of the current sightings is that we still lack clear evidence. On the other hand; the investigations have great backing and they are putting out hundreds of trail cameras with the hope of getting new footage.
Did anyone watch Extinct or alive? It was pretty good. Forrest is very passionate about finding animals declared extinct. He brings a ton of stuff including duct tape to try to catch fur to get DNA from and very old food, the smellier the better he says. I'm surprised he wasn't attacked for the rotting food.

I almost didn't watch the episode because there was a special on Discovery network a year or so ago but the show featured newer footage. Apparently this was his 2nd or 3rd time going to look for the Tasmanian Tiger. He plans to go back. I'll be shocked if he doesn't have another episode next season with newer footage. He never posts about his findings until it comes out in the show. I wonder if he filmed any extras that he didn't include because he didn't want people to know an animal wasn't extinct. There is tons of jungle that has not been mapped and sees no humans so the possibility an extinct animal was driven there is very possible. That's what he does, tried to go to places that are hard to get to; they even use a special drone.

Do I think it's still out there? Yes and I think Forrest will be the one to find it. If I remember right he left trail cams out there.
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Old 09-02-2018, 12:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
Not exactly. They were in serious trouble as a species by the time the bounty was put on their heads. See my earlier post here and the linked articles:

//www.city-data.com/forum/52950269-post9.html

Repeating my quote from the earlier post:

In other words, the bounty was the final blow to a species that was likely to become extinct even without ranchers shooting them.
Even so, the list of things causing their demise where brought on by people, such as dogs, fire, disease and the rest of the list. One has to wonder what their numbers were and how healthy the population was before Europeans landed on the island. Tasmania does not have dingos.
So indeed, their demise was caused by man, not nature either directly by shooting them or other means. They filled their niche in Tasmania perfectly and I doubt their numbers were in any kind of trouble before Europeans.

Last edited by marino760; 09-02-2018 at 12:58 PM..
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Old 09-02-2018, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
17,815 posts, read 14,109,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Other than a dead body or one caught alive, there will be no definitive proof that it still exists. Anyone can dismiss footage from a trail camera especially if the photo is taken at night.

This video has been shown before. If this isn't a thylacine than what could it be? No dog has a straight tail that doesn't wag or move up nor down and is 3/4 of it's body length. It's gate is also unique as it seems to favor one leg and then the other and then neither.

Is this incredible footage appearing to show 'extinct' Tasmanian Tiger running through fields in Victoria proof that the Thylacine still exists? | Daily Mail Online

That is a great video and I have seen other pictures. It is one of the reasons that I hold out more hope for somebody finding them alive than finding a Big Foot. Of course we still need one caught in a cage to be studied (maybe with an electronic collar to see if there are more). Hopefully no more will ever be shot if they do still exist. That would make a reintroduction program a lot easier.

Since humans live in Tasmania; I presume that some feral dogs could roam their woods (maybe)?
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Old 09-02-2018, 01:10 PM
 
14,126 posts, read 6,984,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
That is a great video and I have seen other pictures. It is one of the reasons that I hold out more hope for somebody finding them alive than finding a Big Foot. Of course we still need one caught in a cage to be studied (maybe with an electronic collar to see if there are more). Hopefully no more will ever be shot if they do still exist. That would make a reintroduction program a lot easier.

Since humans live in Tasmania; I presume that some feral dogs could roam their woods (maybe)?
I'm sure there are some feral dogs there but feral dogs are much easier to catch and eliminate than feral cats. I doubt an occasional feral dog is much of a threat. There is one old account of a thylacine killing a dog about it's own size by taking the dogs entire head in it's very wide mouth and biting down.
What it can't compete with is a dog's fast reproduction rate and dogs forming packs.

Last edited by marino760; 09-02-2018 at 01:26 PM..
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Old 09-02-2018, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
17,815 posts, read 14,109,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I'm sure there are some feral dogs there but feral dogs are much easier to catch and eliminate than feral cats. I doubt an occasional feral dog is much of a threat. There is one old account of a thylacine killing a dog about it's own size by taking the dogs entire head in it's very wide mouth and biting down.
We used to have packs of feral dogs in the coal mining areas of PA. Since the coyotes came in I have not heard of any sightings of the feral dogs - but our local news coverage is not as good as it once was. A pack of dogs or coyotes is considerably more lethal than one. All of this is still just speculation and I do wish that they would come up with some proof.

I am surprised that the SyFy channel does not sponsor a genetics program to reintroduce Megalodon. It's right up their alley and they could show movies for many, many years!
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Old 09-02-2018, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,795 posts, read 4,510,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Even so, the list of things causing their demise where brought on by people, such as dogs, fire, disease and the rest of the list. One has to wonder what their numbers were and how healthy the population was before Europeans landed on the island. Tasmania does not have dingos.
So indeed, their demise was caused by man, not nature either directly by shooting them or other means. They filled their niche in Tasmania perfectly and I doubt their numbers were in any kind of trouble before Europeans.
That's a fair point. I don't think there's enough data on the history of thylacines in Tasmania to figure out how healthy the poulation was before Europeans arrived.
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