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Old 02-13-2020, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,665 posts, read 12,557,900 times
Reputation: 11784

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
August 1958, when a construction crew was building a road through the rugged wilderness near Bluff Creek, Humboldt County, and discovered giant humanlike footprints in the ground around their equipment. For several mornings running, the men discovered that something had been disturbing their small equipment during the night. In one instance, an 800-pound tire and wheel from an earthmoving machine had been picked up and carried several yards across the compound. In another, a 300-pound drum of oil had been stolen from the camp, carried up a rocky mountain slope, and tossed into a deep canyon. And in each instance, only massive 16-inch footprints with a 50-to-60-inch stride offered any clue to the vandal's identity.
Where there is a will there is a way. I have worked on freight docks and in a chemical plant when much younger. Oil in a drum is relatively light at about 325 pounds for 55 gallons. Water is over 500 pounds for the same volume and some chemical compounds can exceed 800 pounds for the same volume. All can be moved by hand either rolling on its edge or laying the drum down and rolling. They also make a drum dollies for moving these drums by hand. The same goes for the 800 pound tire; I have moved considerably heavier tires by hand. These are not impossible feats and it sounds more like kids were simply showing off their strength or being mischievous.

I get a kick out of some of the Ford truck commercials where they have their trucks pulling railroad cars. If the tracks are perfectly level, the bearing are in good shape and lubricated, and the railcar has not stopped in a crack, I could move cars that had 80,000 pounds of cargo in them by hand. Sometimes I would have to use a tool called a 'boxcar mover' to get them going and sometimes I could just start pushing.

Before we look to the unknown reasons how things can get moved; one has to look at the probable ways things can move.
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Old 02-13-2020, 04:04 PM
 
11,380 posts, read 10,811,660 times
Reputation: 4471
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Where there is a will there is a way. I have worked on freight docks and in a chemical plant when much younger. Oil in a drum is relatively light at about 325 pounds for 55 gallons. Water is over 500 pounds for the same volume and some chemical compounds can exceed 800 pounds for the same volume. All can be moved by hand either rolling on its edge or laying the drum down and rolling. They also make a drum dollies for moving these drums by hand. The same goes for the 800 pound tire; I have moved considerably heavier tires by hand. These are not impossible feats and it sounds more like kids were simply showing off their strength or being mischievous.

I get a kick out of some of the Ford truck commercials where they have their trucks pulling railroad cars. If the tracks are perfectly level, the bearing are in good shape and lubricated, and the railcar has not stopped in a crack, I could move cars that had 80,000 pounds of cargo in them by hand. Sometimes I would have to use a tool called a 'boxcar mover' to get them going and sometimes I could just start pushing.

Before we look to the unknown reasons how things can get moved; one has to look at the probable ways things can move.
They did and found your reasons not plausible in that situation. irrc
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Old 02-13-2020, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,665 posts, read 12,557,900 times
Reputation: 11784
Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
They did and found your reasons not plausible in that situation. irrc
What does irrc mean? Or what does the Independent Regulatory Review Commission have to do with any of this. Maybe you just have a little typo?
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Old 02-13-2020, 07:22 PM
 
11,380 posts, read 10,811,660 times
Reputation: 4471
What we have here is a failure to interpolate.
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Old 02-13-2020, 11:14 PM
 
14,101 posts, read 3,737,664 times
Reputation: 9097
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Where there is a will there is a way. I have worked on freight docks and in a chemical plant when much younger. Oil in a drum is relatively light at about 325 pounds for 55 gallons. Water is over 500 pounds for the same volume and some chemical compounds can exceed 800 pounds for the same volume. All can be moved by hand either rolling on its edge or laying the drum down and rolling. They also make a drum dollies for moving these drums by hand. The same goes for the 800 pound tire; I have moved considerably heavier tires by hand. These are not impossible feats and it sounds more like kids were simply showing off their strength or being mischievous.

I get a kick out of some of the Ford truck commercials where they have their trucks pulling railroad cars. If the tracks are perfectly level, the bearing are in good shape and lubricated, and the railcar has not stopped in a crack, I could move cars that had 80,000 pounds of cargo in them by hand. Sometimes I would have to use a tool called a 'boxcar mover' to get them going and sometimes I could just start pushing.

Before we look to the unknown reasons how things can get moved; one has to look at the probable ways things can move.
If some kids had rolled the oil drum up steep mountainsides, I think there would be some evidence of that left behind (from the weight of the drum rolling alone), but they claim the only left behind was large footprints in a large stride...so I guess these kids had a piece of wood they fashioned to look like a big foot and while they were rolling the 300lb oil drum up the steep mountain, they cleverly used the fake foot to make it look like a bigfoot did it...Yeah, that sounds realistic!! LOL
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Old Yesterday, 07:57 AM
 
11,380 posts, read 10,811,660 times
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Yes! It is always kids, college students, hoaxers, people on drugs, or mental cases.
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Old Yesterday, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,665 posts, read 12,557,900 times
Reputation: 11784
Quote:
Originally Posted by rstevens62 View Post
If some kids had rolled the oil drum up steep mountainsides, I think there would be some evidence of that left behind (from the weight of the drum rolling alone), but they claim the only left behind was large footprints in a large stride...so I guess these kids had a piece of wood they fashioned to look like a big foot and while they were rolling the 300lb oil drum up the steep mountain, they cleverly used the fake foot to make it look like a bigfoot did it...Yeah, that sounds realistic!! LOL
300 pound oil drums are not hard to roll. Of course it depends on the terrain and slope of the hill. Have you ever moved a car or pickup truck by hand? Of course you are not going to move them over rough terrain.

While you don't think that is realistic; what reason would a Big Foot have to move that drum? I think you presume it just wanted the exercise or that it hated clean water so it decided to toss in a drum of oil?
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Old Yesterday, 08:23 AM
 
11,380 posts, read 10,811,660 times
Reputation: 4471
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
300 pound oil drums are not hard to roll. Of course it depends on the terrain and slope of the hill. Have you ever moved a car or pickup truck by hand? Of course you are not going to move them over rough terrain.

While you don't think that is realistic; what reason would a Big Foot have to move that drum? I think you presume it just wanted the exercise or that it hated clean water so it decided to toss in a drum of oil?
Talk about a rabbit hole! 1st. You say BF doesn't exist. 2nd You want 62 to tell us what this supposedly nonexistent creature was thinking.

Common sense would tell you that the lack of footprints of perpetrators (kids and their car tracks) and the fact that there was already a steep hillside to roll it off of and they didn't need to go uphill.
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Old Yesterday, 08:46 AM
 
324 posts, read 80,567 times
Reputation: 730
Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile View Post
Yes! It is always kids, college students, hoaxers, people on drugs, or mental cases.
I agree, so far that is all we have.
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Old Yesterday, 08:58 AM
 
11,380 posts, read 10,811,660 times
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Yes, they are pretty deplorable excuses.

My sister would always say(as kids) "Nevermind! Nevermind" When she would lose an argument.

Same kind of a comeback
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