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Old 11-26-2022, 09:35 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
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BIRD ATTACKS



The Houston Herald (Houston, Mo) June 20, 1963 Pg1

BIG BIRDS ATTACK GIRL ON FARM

https://www.newspapers.com/clip/3436...ouston-herald/




Star Tribune (Minneapolis, Minn.) June 27, 1909 Pg45

BOLD BIRDS ATTACK LINEMAN

https://www.newspapers.com/clip/33492616/star-tribune/
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Old 11-26-2022, 01:43 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
Reputation: 14571
The Butler Weekly Times (Butler, Mo) Jan. 4, 1882 Pg6

Two prospectors recently discovered a strange slab of stone near Spanish Springs, Nevada. The rock is set in a deep ravine. It is 15 feet high and 10 feet wide. The entire face of the stone is covered with over 100 characters, which the discoverers could not decipher. The rock will be closely examined and a copy of the inscriptions forwarded to scientists.

This could be it;

https://www.nevadaappeal.com/news/20...story-found-j/






St. Louis Republic August 13, 1900 Pg3

DISCOVERED IN MOSQUITOS

Liverpool, Aug. 12--- Reports received from Nigeria, where the scientific expedition recently sent out by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine is operating, show that the parasite which causes elephantiasis has been discovered in mosquitos.
The leaders of the expedition believe that the experiments which are now being carried on to stamp out malaria by preventing mosquito inoculation can be applied to elephantiasis, which is so prevalent among natives of tropical countries.
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Old 11-26-2022, 04:47 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
Reputation: 14571
The Farmington Times (St. Francois County, Mo) Nov. 24, 1905 Pg4

ECLIPSE IN MALTA

An engineer who viewed the recent eclipse of the sun from his station in Malta describes the effect of the darkness on the inhabitants of that island.
" The Maltese nearly went mad with fright, thinking the world was coming to an end. All the people of the village where I am living ran into the church, while some rang the church bells and some even fired off large fireworks, but it was all over in about 15 minutes and then the Maltese left the church and made their way back to their houses, still looking scared."




Scott County Kicker (Benton, Mo) Nov. 30, 1901 Pg2

HE SLEPT ON THE TRACK

At Palmyra the other night, Henry Nelson and Henry Ward, young farmers, became intoxicated and wandered to the Burlington Railroad yards and went to sleep. Nelson lay on the rails and his companion a few yards from him. A freight train killed Nelson.
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Old 11-27-2022, 04:29 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
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George Fikes



Interview With A Ghost 1877

https://memoryln.net/places/united-s...go-ghost-1877/




https://www.wgpfoundation.org/histor...he-post-ghost/
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Old 11-27-2022, 11:12 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
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This is a long post.


St. Louis Republic June 10, 1900

HOODOO DOCTOR TRIED TO CAST SPELL ABOUT THE GALLOWS

Grief set all the skill of an old negro hoodoo doctor at naught, and the charms that were to have placed the governor of Missouri and the sheriff of St. Louis County under their spell and save the grandson of the old doctor from the gallows failed.

At least that is the opinion of the relatives of Reuben Dixon, an old man-some say he was over 100 years old-who died at Webster Groves a year or more ago and over the division of whose estate the relatives are now fighting in court.

Those who knew that the old man tried to hoodoo the governor and the sheriff kept the fact a secret until the other day when, in the Probate Court in Clayton, one of the witnesses in the suit over the estate inadvertently mentioned it.

Reuben was an old Virginia slave belonging to a family named Dixon. This family moved to Callaway County, Missouri, some years before the Civil War, and it was then that the hoodoo power was given to Reuben by an old Indian. After the war had ended, Reuben and his family moved to Webster Groves. There he practiced his weird art of "casting spells" and grew wealthy-wealthy as compared with his neighbors, at least.

His children married, and to one of them, Hester, who married a man named Foster, was born a son whom she named Sam. A few years ago Sam, grown to manhood, was convicted of the murder of Bertram Atwater, the Chicago newspaper artist, who was killed in the county one night while he was on his way to visit his sweetheart.

The old hoodoo doctor was an invalid then. In the time of the Civil War he had contracted a disease which had rendered useless his lower limbs which had crept slowly along his body.But his mind had not been affected and his skill as a hoodoo doctor-a skill which no negro had ever questioned-had not deserted him.

Lawyers had failed to clear his grandson, but the old man was not hopeless. He declared that he would save him-when the time came. In the opinion of the believers in his powers the fact that he wait long for the proper time was the cause of his failure of his plans. For in waiting the old man brooded over the peril of his grandson and with brooding he became grief-stricken. His sorrow weakened his mind and his memory lost some of its strength.

But the old man did not know this. When the time had come, and his grandson stood in the shadow of the gallows, the old man had his daughter gather wild roots and strange herbs, the crop of a chicken killed at a certain period of the moon, old bones of man, beast and wild fowl, dew drops that were shaken from the leaves of certain plants and water from a certain spring. These he compounded in proportions that he kept secret, and he heated and stewed over a certain kind of fire, in a special pot at a certain hour while he mumbled strange words in a voice so low and a tongue so thick that none but the spirits which he invoked might catch their sound.

At last the brew had reached the proper state, and the final incantation was begun. The old man was halfway through with it, when he halted. A troubled look appeared on his face. He had forgotten some of the mystic words. He began again, nervously, but memory would not be moved.

The crisis was passing. The pot on the fire was giving forth steam of the proper volume and odor to carry the hoodoo prayer to the hoodoo spirits. But the old man could not remember the proper words. His mind sought them in vain, and then, desperately, he substituted others that belonged to other prayers. The old hoodoo was trembling. His voice was weak, and when the ceremony had ended, moans of doubt and despair fell from his lips.

Then he began to pray to the spirits-to plead with them-to flatter them, to move them to pity. And he made sacrifices and humbled himself. But the omission of the words from the incantation was fatal to the charm. It failed to cast a spell over the governor and the sheriff, and on the appointed day the old man's grandson was hanged

It was the only time Reuben had failed-the only time since that day in the woods 60 years ago, when the old Indian had told him the secret of the mighty charm and bade him reveal it to no one. For three-score years the old man had been casting spells. He had warded off death, from himself and from others; he had rewarded friends and punished enemies.

In the hour of his greatest need the spirits had failed him, the charm had not worked. Never afterwards did the old man call upon the spirits. He sat day in and day out in the big old easy chair that had been his home for 30 years, and crooned old hymns. His body grew weaker, his pains more acute.

And at last the end came. Many sought to gain from the dying hoodoo doctor the secret that the Indian had imparted to him there in the woods, but he drove them away. To no mortal did he ever repeat the words that gave to the strange compounds their wonderful power.
The secret went with him to the grave.




Researching more about him was kind of difficult, but I did find something on his grandson, Sam Foster.

https://www.stltoday.com/news/archiv...b8fa1c152.html
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Old 11-28-2022, 04:06 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
Reputation: 14571
Hannibal Journal (Hannibal, Mo) March 17, 1853 Pg2

A few days ago a box was taken from the Delaware River about one mile below Delaware City, and its contents were found to be the body of a female, packed in wheat and rye straw.
The clothes indicated that the woman had been murdered.
The body had been so long in the water that it was almost entirely decomposed.




St. Louis Republic May 18, 1900 Pg5

FORTUNE CAME TOO LATE

Chicago, May 17---While a lawyer who had come from Colorado was hunting yesterday for Henry Thale, an iron worker who had been employed on the new Western Electric building, to inform him that he had fallen heir to the property of an uncle who had died in California, leaving the iron worker an estate valued at $109,000, the body of the beneficiary was being taken to the County Morgue in a patrol wagon.

Thale and W.C. Keesler, a fellow workman, were on a scaffold swung between the wings of a building 75 feet from the ground. A piece of iron knocked him off the scaffold. Thale had been employed at the building only three weeks.



The Montgomery Tribune (Montgomery City, Mo) Oct. 5, 1900 Pg6

PUTTING A HEAD ON IT

" This is a great story," said the new reporter.

" But I can't think of a good head for it. It's about a trusted employee, whose accounts were found to be crooked, and when he was accused of it, he dropped dead."

" That's easy," said the editor.

" Head it, died from exposure."
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Old 11-28-2022, 10:49 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
Reputation: 14571
The Holt County Sentinel (Oregon, Mo) Aug. 18, 1865 Pg3

LUSUS NATURAE

Mrs. H- living near Mount Pleasant, Cooper County, Mo., was delivered on the 17th of July by Dr. J.P.H. Gray, of that city, of a child with one head, four arms, four hands, four legs and four feet. The mother is doing well.



The Laclede Blade (Laclede, Mo) Dec. 6, 1902 Pg2

A western genius has invented an alarm-clock in the shape of a finger-ring, which arouses the sleeper without disturbing other members of the household.
The alarm is set at the hour one desires to be awakened, and at the appointed time a small needle runs out from the clock and pricks the finger of the wearer.



The Monett Times (Monett, Mo) May 7, 1909 Pg5

The former outlaw Cole Younger has taken to the lecture platform. The old instinct of holding people up and taking their money away from them is strong even in the days of his decline.
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Old 11-28-2022, 09:10 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
Reputation: 14571
Crystal Skulls

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_skull





Superstition Mountains Strange Encounters

https://beliefhole.com/4-12-supersti...esert-portals/
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Old 11-29-2022, 05:24 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
Reputation: 14571
Glasgow Weekly Times (Howard County, Mo) Aug. 31, 1866 Pg2

A Mobile paper tells of a suicide who left a note, stating that " to prevent identification, I have hidden my own head where you will never find it." His body was headless.




St. Louis Post-Dispatch Aug. 31, 1896

BARKED LIKE A DOG

Civil War Blog » Poisoned By Lead, Veteran Runs Naked in Boarding House, 1896





St. Louis Post-Dispatch June 24, 1902 Pg8

FRIGHTENED TO DEATH BY DREAM

https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4827...eath-by-dream/
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Old 11-29-2022, 09:31 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
10,019 posts, read 8,629,758 times
Reputation: 14571
The Gray Man Ghost

https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/wei...y-man-16885673






Mystery Of The West Plains Dance Hall Explosion 1928

https://wizzley.com/the-mystery-of-t...all-explosion/
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