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Old 05-24-2012, 07:28 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Would you say this has been what you've observed?

They tend to have a more distinctive way of speaking compared to say Australian or North American teens. A phrase like, 'he/she was well fit,' or something, for instance, and other pretty distinctive words/ways of phrasing things. They just seem to use more slang/colloqualisms, although it depends a lot on where they're from and class.
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Old 05-24-2012, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Would you say this has been what you've observed?

They tend to have a more distinctive way of speaking compared to say Australian or North American teens. A phrase like, 'he/she was well fit,' or something, for instance, and other pretty distinctive words/ways of phrasing things. They just seem to use more slang/colloqualisms, although it depends a lot on where they're from and class.
Probably, yes. I have not witnessed the same usage of slang words anywhere in the US and since you're Australian, you know how it is there.
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Old 05-24-2012, 01:15 PM
 
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I'd say so.
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Old 05-28-2012, 03:00 AM
 
Location: san Francisko
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Its true,british teens can say smth that we cant understand,but what from appear theres sleng....
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Old 05-28-2012, 03:24 AM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
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I know a lot of chavvy English teens who constantly misspell words on purpose and call it "slang". Really?
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Old 05-28-2012, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Scotland
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Why do you know a lot of chavvy English teens??
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:24 AM
 
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SB.TV - P Money - Slang Like This [Music Video] - YouTube
You'll hear this in London and a few other of the larger cities but not in the vast majority of the country.

Great song anyway..
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:33 AM
 
Location: La Cañada
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I went to England once, and I didn't really here many teens talking, although I figured I wouldn't. I always thought that Brits in general used LESS slang than Australians, Americans or Canadians...in that we have different forms of English, which is their original language (so they would be less prone to change it).

Or does it depend on class?
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Old 05-28-2012, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCalifornianWriter View Post
I went to England once, and I didn't really here many teens talking, although I figured I wouldn't. I always thought that Brits in general used LESS slang than Australians, Americans or Canadians...in that we have different forms of English, which is their original language (so they would be less prone to change it).

Or does it depend on class?
It varies more by region, IMO. Some local dialects tend to use more slang than others. Class? In some ways Britain is still class divided, but nowhere near as much as it used to be. Few people speak the queen's English anymore. In fact, much of the south east has a very "generic" accent, even traditional cockney is dying out and being replaced by estuary English.
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Old 05-28-2012, 09:29 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCalifornianWriter View Post
I went to England once, and I didn't really here many teens talking, although I figured I wouldn't. I always thought that Brits in general used LESS slang than Australians, Americans or Canadians...in that we have different forms of English, which is their original language (so they would be less prone to change it).

Or does it depend on class?
On the contrary, I've heard Australian, American accents have retained more 'conservative' speech features for some reason. Kind of like how some think the Spanish spoken in Latin America is closer to the Spanish spoken during the time of King Phillip and Columbus.
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