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Old 05-31-2012, 01:28 PM
 
Location: SW France
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There's a difference between country people and people who just live in the country.
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Old 05-31-2012, 01:58 PM
 
Location: The Silver State (from the UK)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jezer View Post
There's a difference between country people and people who just live in the country.

Good point.
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Old 05-31-2012, 02:06 PM
 
Location: The Silver State (from the UK)
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I live in a city of 1.7 million and the nearest metro is well over a thousand miles away.

Crossing the Nullabor was a really remote feeling. Is there anywhere in the US where you can drive on a national highway and not see a car for 2 hours? This is the ONLY sealed east-west route unless you go by the Top End, 2,500 km north. Roadhouses were spaced about 300 km (190 miles) apart so you had to fill up a full tank at each. If they were out of fuel, tough luck, you had to wait till they got some. If you ran out, it could be hours before anyone got to you, if not longer.

Driving across the Nullabor - dead silence. Not sure if you experienced TOTAL silence in the Outback before, it's eerie. You could here a pin drop a mile away. Total silence and total darkness, no wonder people talk about weird things happening on the paddock. Also the roads are so straight - you just see for miles and miles ahead - you see the road continuing for at least 5-6 km until it seemed to vanish into the horizon.


You can but it's not as remote as the outback. Driving through North Dakota and between San Fran and Vegas (the desert drive) reminded me of it. If you drive north of me to Area 51 you won't see any traffic either.. in fact most of Nevada is federally owned land and untouched.

The eerie silence you speak of is incredible. If there is no wind it feels like bring deaf! Hikking in the canyons in the desert here can be like that too - I love it! I would say the outback driving and camping was my favorite part of being in Australia, even more than Sydney, Melbourne, Cairns and the Great Barrier Reef.
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Old 05-31-2012, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Remote in terms of accessibility? Even the most remote parts of the Highlands or North Wales doesn't seem too inaccessible, let alone far from a city.

I live in a state that is 10 times the size of the UK, 20 times the size of England, where perhaps 80% of the state is literally empty. You can go from Eucla, in the south, to Kunnunurra in the far north, and not cross a single sealed road. There is literally not even a TOWN of ANY size for over 2,000 kilometres.
Have you actually been to the Highlands or Wales? Because if not, trust me, the map may show that towns are close by but in terms of getting there, it's really not simple. Roads up there are single lanes with very little passing room, they twist and turn for miles, there are miles and miles where the only building you see is a shepherd's hut and forget about public transportation. It may be a lot smaller than what you're used to, but don't patronise the inhabitants by saying it's not remote enough. If you live in one of those villages and don't have access to transportation, you're seriously stuck. Especially in Winter! Even in the relatively busy Cotswolds in southern England that can be a real pain in the #$@*.
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Old 06-01-2012, 01:32 AM
 
Location: SW France
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I moved to London after finishing school.

I was at a bus stop where I heard two women complaining that the bus was fifteen minutes late.

Where I had lived if you missed the bus you waited a week for the next one.
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Old 06-01-2012, 03:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Jezer View Post
I moved to London after finishing school.

I was at a bus stop where I heard two women complaining that the bus was fifteen minutes late.

Where I had lived if you missed the bus you waited a week for the next one.
Thanks for that. (wipes coffee off monitor)
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Old 06-01-2012, 07:23 AM
 
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Default Are country people that different anymore?

Yes they are.

They generally have a slower pace to life, they're a bit more patient. Not so fussed by what people are wearing but more interested in the person so not so shallow i suppose.

Your also FAR more likely (as in you'll always get one at a bus stop) to get a random stranger talk to you and have a chat whenever your stood beside them for 5 minutes. When they talk to you they seem to listen.

I live in Devon (Ooh Ar!) and i've noticed this in all the neighbouring counties too. Cornwall, Somerset, Dorset, Wiltshire and nearby Worscestershire and Gloucestershire. Also seen it in Norfolk and Suffolk and various other counties across Britain.
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Old 06-05-2012, 04:58 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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It seems like a mile is a long way in England. Because America is so young and homogenous, distances don't seem to matter as much.
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Old 09-16-2012, 10:21 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
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Sorry for bumping this thread but it caught my attention. In the US there is definitely a difference between city and country in the USA. People in Wyoming are quite different from people in cities.
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Old 09-18-2012, 01:38 PM
 
1,058 posts, read 1,300,654 times
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Ironically, Wyoming is one of the places that first started using the phrase "anymore" to mean "now" in all cases, and this awful piece of English is now common in cities.
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