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Old 01-23-2008, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Gloucs, Uk
22 posts, read 76,145 times
Reputation: 17

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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
That's true - there is no such thing as 'class' - in reality, it only exists in your imagination, or others'. But it is an interesting subject to observe. Humans are odd....

A friend of mine moved to Austin, Tx because her husband's upper-class old-money New York family disapproved of their lifestyle choices. Maybe it's not 'class' really - but what else do you call it???

self righteous??!!

i agree that humans are odd...but very interesting too

 
Old 01-23-2008, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,751 posts, read 10,372,098 times
Reputation: 7010
Default Upper class first names?

This is all very interesting.... I lived in the British West Indies for a bit and could never really figure out this British class system (although it may be more "flexible" on the islands). My British friend once told me that, in the UK, my first name would idenify me as upper class. She explained that one can identify the upper class by the limited number of first names that are used (Caroline, Victoria, Elizabeth, etc...). True?
 
Old 01-23-2008, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,026 posts, read 24,618,732 times
Reputation: 20165
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCUBS1 View Post
This is all very interesting.... I lived in the British West Indies for a bit and could never really figure out this British class system (although it may be more "flexible" on the islands). My British friend once told me that, in the UK, my first name would idenify me as upper class. She explained that one can identify the upper class by the limited number of first names that are used (Caroline, Victoria, Elizabeth, etc...). True?

Well , yes to a certain extent this is true. No English upper class person would call their daughter Kylie, Sharon or Vana or their son Gary, Jason or Dwayne !

There never will be a King Tyler or Princess Leanne . Not in my lifetime anyway !

'Chav' names feared by teachers | the Daily Mail
 
Old 01-23-2008, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,751 posts, read 10,372,098 times
Reputation: 7010
Default The meaning of "Chav"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
Well , yes to a certain extent this is true. No English upper class person would call their daughter Kylie, Sharon or Vana or their son Gary, Jason or Dwayne !

There never will be a King Tyler or Princess Leanne . Not in my lifetime anyway !

'Chav' names feared by teachers | the Daily Mail
Ok, maybe I'm sheltered, but I had to look up "Chav" in Wikipedia. I had not heard this term B4. But I like it and will incorporate it into my lexicon...


Chav, also Charv/Charver and Chavette (pronounced /ʧæv/, with 'ch' as in chair) are mainly derogatory slang terms in the United Kingdom for a subcultural stereotype fixated on fashions such as imitation gold, poorly made jewellery and fake designer clothing (often Burberry), combined with elements of working class British street fashion.
 
Old 01-23-2008, 10:28 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,056,368 times
Reputation: 4210
Chav jokes, translation:impossible!

What do you call a Chav in a box?
Innit.

What do you call a Chav in a filing cabinet?
Sorted.

What do you call a Chav in a box with a lock on it?
Safe.

What do you call an Eskimo Chav?
Innuinnit.

What's the first question at a Chav quiz night?
"What you f**in' lookin' at?"
 
Old 01-23-2008, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,751 posts, read 10,372,098 times
Reputation: 7010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
Well , yes to a certain extent this is true. No English upper class person would call their daughter Kylie, Sharon or Vana or their son Gary, Jason or Dwayne !

There never will be a King Tyler or Princess Leanne . Not in my lifetime anyway !

'Chav' names feared by teachers | the Daily Mail

This article confirms what I've experienced. The British are much more obsessed with what your name confers about your social status. British school teachers make sweeping generalizations about children based merely on their first name (before they even meet the kid!) Unbelievable...

Thank heavens I have an upper class name. I hope I named my children correctly.
 
Old 01-23-2008, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,026 posts, read 24,618,732 times
Reputation: 20165
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCUBS1 View Post
This article confirms what I've experienced. The British are much more obsessed with what your name confers about your social status. British school teachers make sweeping generalizations about children based merely on their first name (before they even meet the kid!) Unbelievable...

Thank heavens I have an upper class name. I hope I named my children correctly.

It's ridiculous I grant you. Sadly the UK still has one of the least socially mobile societies I know. Not very democratic ( well we do still have the bloody Queen), and certainly not very meritocratic.

It has got much, much better in the last 20 years but I think there is still much improvement to be made. IMO , that starts with having an elected Head of State not a Monarchy.

Mind you regarding names ( nothing to do with upper/working class on that particular topic), it has been shown by sociology studies that our names mould us all and where we go in life. That's outside the UK as well as inside.

For example kids with more "eccentric" or unusual names are more likely to do different things, be more creative, become explorers etc...
Maybe it has to do with living up to your name.
 
Old 01-23-2008, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Gloucs, Uk
22 posts, read 76,145 times
Reputation: 17
all this 'atic' words going on, chav language and upper class i'm feeling a bit left out!!
the names thing is gearing more towards the unusual and stupid these last few years...like its a competition who can have the most rediculous name for there child! i missed the point with mine i think...thank goodness!!!!

imagine living up to peaches!!!! in fact....my neck hurts looking up that far!!
 
Old 01-23-2008, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,751 posts, read 10,372,098 times
Reputation: 7010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
it has been shown by sociology studies that our names mould us all and where we go in life. That's outside the UK as well as inside.
I did see that British name study.... And I believe your name affects you to a certain degree. But if this article is accurate, it seems that many UK teachers pre-judge each child based merely on name and perhaps then help to "mould" them into their pre-conceived class stereotypes. I just do not see this sort of thing in the U.S. schools/society. In fact, most of these 'chav' names are quite popular here.

Could a "Barack Obama" ever get elected in the UK?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

These are the girls' names that made the teachers blanch - some with comments attached: Adrienne (kiss of death - spiteful, sneaky or both), Alanna, Ashleigh, Britney, Candice, Chantelle (spawn of the devil), Chelsie, Chelseigh, Chloe (nasty, spiteful).
Cindy (always a pain in the a**e) Courtney, Cortnee, Cortnie (trouble), Danielle (a nightmare), Jade, Jodie, Jordan (pretty bad for a girl), Kayleigh (a pain), Keeley, Keira (live in fear), Kimberley, Kylie, Leanne, Leigh, Lou-Lou, Mia, Paige, Poppy (hyperactive and not very bright), Stacey, Tyler (lesson disrupter).


And these are the boys' names that the teachers most fear: Ashley, Chayse, Conor, Connor (a nightmare), Curtis, Damon, Declan, Dillon/Dylan, Dwayne (a terror), Grant, Jordan, Josh (arrogant, nasty, selfish. Kade, Kane, Kieron, Kyle (always spells trouble), Liam (always a bad lad), Mason (a horror), Mitchell, Myles, Painton, Rhys / Reece (a nightmare), Ryan, Scott (live in fear), Shane (a terror), Troy, Tyler (lesson disrupter), Wayne (a terror).
 
Old 01-23-2008, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,026 posts, read 24,618,732 times
Reputation: 20165
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCUBS1 View Post
I did see that British name study.... And I believe your name affects you to a certain degree. But if this article is accurate, it seems that many UK teachers pre-judge each child based merely on name and perhaps then help to "mould" them into their pre-conceived class stereotypes. I just do not see this sort of thing in the U.S. schools/society. In fact, most of these 'chav' names are quite popular here.

Could a "Barack Obama" ever get elected in the UK?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

These are the girls' names that made the teachers blanch - some with comments attached: Adrienne (kiss of death - spiteful, sneaky or both), Alanna, Ashleigh, Britney, Candice, Chantelle (spawn of the devil), Chelsie, Chelseigh, Chloe (nasty, spiteful).
Cindy (always a pain in the a**e) Courtney, Cortnee, Cortnie (trouble), Danielle (a nightmare), Jade, Jodie, Jordan (pretty bad for a girl), Kayleigh (a pain), Keeley, Keira (live in fear), Kimberley, Kylie, Leanne, Leigh, Lou-Lou, Mia, Paige, Poppy (hyperactive and not very bright), Stacey, Tyler (lesson disrupter).


And these are the boys' names that the teachers most fear: Ashley, Chayse, Conor, Connor (a nightmare), Curtis, Damon, Declan, Dillon/Dylan, Dwayne (a terror), Grant, Jordan, Josh (arrogant, nasty, selfish. Kade, Kane, Kieron, Kyle (always spells trouble), Liam (always a bad lad), Mason (a horror), Mitchell, Myles, Painton, Rhys / Reece (a nightmare), Ryan, Scott (live in fear), Shane (a terror), Troy, Tyler (lesson disrupter), Wayne (a terror).
I think Barack Obama is such a classless ( ie not associated with class at all rather than lacking in class , BTW) name , he would probably do quite well ! Actually he is very popular here. Probably the most popular candidate with Edwards. That's for the people who follow the US elections anyway.

And pre-judging a child is certainly not a good way to set them on the road to success. I quite agree.
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