Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > United Kingdom
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-09-2008, 07:33 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
Reputation: 12303

Advertisements

When i was in the U.S. Navy some of my friends who got to go to England were telling me that some Brits would come up to them and ask them for a ''f.a.g.'' (had to put periods in there to post it) and at first they were like what??? But they said that is the word for Cigarettes. True term or not i always chucked on that. (no i'm not bashing gay's).

6/3
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-09-2008, 08:03 AM
 
Location: London
50 posts, read 182,642 times
Reputation: 18
And is it true that what we call a 'manual' car in UK is called a 'stick shift' in USA? I saw this on a crime programme the other night and it sounded interesting. They seemed to imply that it was more unusual for people to have a licence to drive 'stick shift' in USA is this so?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2008, 08:17 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,030,412 times
Reputation: 4210
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
When i was in the U.S. Navy some of my friends who got to go to England were telling me that some Brits would come up to them and ask them for a ''f.a.g.'' (had to put periods in there to post it) and at first they were like what??? But they said that is the word for Cigarettes. True term or not i always chucked on that. (no i'm not bashing gay's).

6/3
Yes The Brits say 'f.ag' all the time. "I'm dying for a f.ag" etc

It seems 'F.aggots' in the original Latin, then English, meant bundle - firewood, sticks of wood etc (as used in Lord of the Rings) which then translated to cigarettes - shortened to 'f.ag.' ??

'F.agging' was also an English word for young public schoolboys acting as servants for the older boys. That would perhaps explain the gay connection???

'F.aggots' are also a traditional British pork-based meatball-like dish.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2008, 08:38 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
Reputation: 12303
Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
Yes The Brits say 'f.ag' all the time. "I'm dying for a f.ag" etc

It seems 'F.aggots' in the original Latin, then English, meant bundle - firewood, sticks of wood etc (as used in Lord of the Rings) which then translated to cigarettes - shortened to 'f.ag.' ??

'F.agging' was also an English word for young public schoolboys acting as servants for the older boys. That would perhaps explain the gay connection???

'F.aggots' are also a traditional British pork-based meatball-like dish.
Thanks for the explanation Southdown !!!

6/3
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2008, 08:43 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
Reputation: 12303
Quote:
Originally Posted by True Brit View Post
And is it true that what we call a 'manual' car in UK is called a 'stick shift' in USA? I saw this on a crime programme the other night and it sounded interesting. They seemed to imply that it was more unusual for people to have a licence to drive 'stick shift' in USA is this so?
Yeap that probably is true. Infact we mostly just say ''Stick'' now. Someone may ask me ''Hey is your truck a stick'' which i know they asking about Stick Shift or Manual. Why ....i don't know but i'm guessing that it sounds more ''Hip'' or ''Cool'' to say Stick Shift or Stick.

Infact i wonder if the terms ''Hip'' and ''Cool'' are American and not British???

6/3
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2008, 08:45 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,030,412 times
Reputation: 4210
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
Yeap that probably is true. Infact we mostly just say ''Stick'' now. Someone may ask me ''Hey is your truck a stick'' which i know they asking about Stick Shift or Manual. Why ....i don't know but i'm guessing that it sounds more ''Hip'' or ''Cool'' to say Stick Shift or Stick.

Infact i wonder if the terms ''Hip'' and ''Cool'' are American and not British???

6/3
My neighbour calls his stick shift truck a 'standard'.

Is that a common expression?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2008, 08:52 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
Reputation: 12303
Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
My neighbour calls his stick shift truck a 'standard'.

Is that a common expression?
That actually is the proper term as it's the term you see on the car commercials and at the dealership where you purchase new vehicles. I usually hear the older crowd use that term say the 60 and 50 y/o's where as we 40 and 30 somethings go with Stick Shift or Stick. I can only imagine what the 20 somethings or late teens call it...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2008, 08:55 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,030,412 times
Reputation: 4210
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
That actually is the proper term as it's the term you see on the car commercials and at the dealership where you purchase new vehicles. I usually hear the older crowd use that term say the 60 and 50 y/o's where as we 40 and 30 somethings go with Stick Shift or Stick. I can only imagine what the 20 somethings or late teens call it...
The teens surely wouldn't dream of driving a stick shift - i mean, how on earth can you change gear with a phone/drink/burger in your hand????
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2008, 09:01 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
Reputation: 12303
Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
The teens surely wouldn't dream of driving a stick shift - i mean, how on earth can you change gear with a phone/drink/burger in your hand????
That's too funny....lol.... and so true

I think the worse they drive the happier they are

I have a another question. Does the term ''Bobbie'' mean Police? And is that the only term you use for the police or bobbies ?? We always say ''Cops'' instead of the proper term police. I think the 60's radicals ''Hippies'' called them ''The Fuzz'' back in those days but either police or cops here in America.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2008, 09:22 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,030,412 times
Reputation: 4210
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
That's too funny....lol.... and so true

I think the worse they drive the happier they are

I have a another question. Does the term ''Bobbie'' mean Police? And is that the only term you use for the police or bobbies ?? We always say ''Cops'' instead of the proper term police. I think the 60's radicals ''Hippies'' called them ''The Fuzz'' back in those days but either police or cops here in America.
Ready for a lengthy reply.....

Bobbies is the original nickname - the first police force was introduced by Robert Peel. They were called 'Peelers' too but that didn't stick...?

It's a gentle term now, a 'bobby on the beat' is a nice policeman doing is his rounds on foot.

We use 'cops' too (why? to 'cop' means to get caught??), or coppers (bit old fashioned now), the bill, or 'the old bill' (from the original Police Bill, when they were introduced), or the 'boys in blue'.

Less kindly terms in UK are 'the pigs' & 'the filth'.

The rozzers, fuzz and babylon are used more by the hippy dope-head types...man
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > United Kingdom

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:13 PM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top