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Old 04-09-2008, 09:38 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,512,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
Less kindly terms in UK are 'the pigs' & 'the filth'.
I forgot about ''Pigs'' as i haven't heard that term since High School in the late 70's and early 80's. We used to joke with our friends back then that if you see a cop call him/her a ''pig'' and when they got mad we'd say.... hey that stands for ''Pride Integrety and Guts'' so they couldn't get mad at us....lol...yeap we were those stupid teens at onetime ourselves

6/3
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Old 04-09-2008, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,170 posts, read 24,238,374 times
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Why, in Evelyn Waugh novels, for example, is a servant and/or valet sometimes called a "batman"? Is this some sort of upper-class British expression? Does it have some special etymological source?
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Old 04-09-2008, 11:21 AM
 
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I saw an English movie where one goon came up on another and pointed a gun at him. He responded with something like, "You haven't got the bottle!" and then was promptly shot.

Sounds like it meant he did not have the guts (courage) to pull the trigger. True or am I remembering the phrase incorrectly?

Cheers (thanks).
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Old 04-09-2008, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Kingman AZ
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Two Countries.....seperated by a common language
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Old 04-09-2008, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Kingman AZ
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My understanding is that COPS [in England] was derived from COPPERS, which was the nickname given to the Police who carried Copper Badges......
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Old 04-09-2008, 02:01 PM
 
Location: England/Wales
3,531 posts, read 2,582,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
Why, in Evelyn Waugh novels, for example, is a servant and/or valet sometimes called a "batman"? Is this some sort of upper-class British expression? Does it have some special etymological source?
A military version of butler..

batman - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
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Old 04-09-2008, 02:05 PM
 
Location: England/Wales
3,531 posts, read 2,582,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I saw an English movie where one goon came up on another and pointed a gun at him. He responded with something like, "You haven't got the bottle!" and then was promptly shot.

Sounds like it meant he did not have the guts (courage) to pull the trigger. True or am I remembering the phrase incorrectly?

Cheers (thanks).

bottle n something akin to "nerve". To "lose one's bottle" is to chicken out of something - often just described as "bottling it". It may be derived from cockney rhyming slang, where "bottle" = "bottle and glass" = "arse". Losing one's bottle appears therefore to refer to losing the contents of one's bowel.

Or as we hear today "Bricking it"
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Old 04-09-2008, 03:26 PM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,030,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post

I have a another question. Does the term ''Bobbie'' mean Police? And is that the only term you use for the police or bobbies ??.
#

There's another term I quite like, for our flatfooted bobby on the beat -'Plod'.

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Old 04-09-2008, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,164 posts, read 27,101,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
That's too funny....lol.... and so true

I think the worse they drive the happier they are

I have a another question. Does the term ''Bobbie'' mean Police? And is that the only term you use for the police or bobbies ?? We always say ''Cops'' instead of the proper term police. I think the 60's radicals ''Hippies'' called them ''The Fuzz'' back in those days but either police or cops here in America.
I've also heard police called the "po-po" or just the "po". More of an urban term, I believe.
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Old 04-09-2008, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,170 posts, read 24,238,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINCOLNSHIRE View Post
Thank you.
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