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Old 04-09-2008, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,170 posts, read 24,237,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
#

There's another term I quite like, for our flatfooted bobby on the beat -'Plod'.


A little off-topic, but in Japan, policemen are called "omawari-san", the derivation being:

omawari = "to circle or go around"
-san = term of respectful address

So: omawari-san = "Mr. Walking-around"
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Old 04-09-2008, 04:41 PM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I've also heard police called the "po-po" or just the "po". More of an urban term, I believe.
Umm...in Britain or the USA.....or both.....
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Old 04-10-2008, 03:57 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,226,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINCOLNSHIRE View Post
bottle n something akin to "nerve". To "lose one's bottle" is to chicken out of something - often just described as "bottling it". It may be derived from cockney rhyming slang, where "bottle" = "bottle and glass" = "arse". Losing one's bottle appears therefore to refer to losing the contents of one's bowel.

Or as we hear today "Bricking it"
Ahh "bottled it..." that reminds me of my days of watching local league snooker when my ex used to play and someone bottled out of a tricky shot. Boring as hell.

Also "nailed it" - got it exactly right.
And "tanking it" - going very fast in one's automobile.

Shoulda nailed it but I bottled it in the end, so I was so **cked off on me way home I was fair tankin' it down the bypass, so this copper pulls up and says right mate you're nicked....

What is "it" anyway? It seems to be getting a lot of abuse.

OK I've got a couple of questions:

- what are the names for different types of household paint in America? I was trying to contribute to something on another forum but couldn't as I didn't know whether there was a direct translation or whether there are loads of different types. I'm really thinking of:

- emulsion (water-based paint used on walls - comes in Matt (not shiny) and silk (a bit shinier)

- gloss (spirit-based paint used on woodwork)

?
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Old 04-10-2008, 05:07 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RH1 View Post

Shoulda nailed it but I bottled it in the end, so I was so **cked off on me way home I was fair tankin' it down the bypass, so this copper pulls up and says right mate you're nicked....
I would be dumbfounded if someone spoke this to me here in the USA. Might as well be Spanish...lol...

Quote:
Originally Posted by RH1 View Post
OK I've got a couple of questions:

- what are the names for different types of household paint in America? I was trying to contribute to something on another forum but couldn't as I didn't know whether there was a direct translation or whether there are loads of different types. I'm really thinking of:

- emulsion (water-based paint used on walls - comes in Matt (not shiny) and silk (a bit shinier)

- gloss (spirit-based paint used on woodwork)
Water base is usually called Latex
I'm thinking Lacquer for wood.
Alkyd paint is usually just called called oil or oil base
Usually paint comes in flat (matt ?) semi gloss (silk ?) and gloss (U.K.?)
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Old 04-10-2008, 06:31 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,226,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
I would be dumbfounded if someone spoke this to me here in the USA. Might as well be Spanish...lol...



Water base is usually called Latex
I'm thinking Lacquer for wood.
Alkyd paint is usually just called called oil or oil base
Usually paint comes in flat (matt ?) semi gloss (silk ?) and gloss (U.K.?)
Thanks for that!

So hang on, what's Alkyd paint? See this is where I get all confused...

Yeah we have matt, silk and... well, gloss I suppose. I don't think I've ever seen anything shinier than silk effect for walls. I just use high gloss stuff on skirting boards (oh GOD, what are they called there???? This just gets more and more complicated... the things that go around the bottom of your walls...) and door frames.

Of course there's new stuff coming out all the time - my OH just used water-based stuff on his woodwork, which sounds like a God-send. My house smells of white spirit (solvent - mixture of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic C7 to C12 hydrocarbons with a maximum content of 25% of C7 to C12 alkyl aromatic hydrocarbons - what do you call that then? ) terribly at the moment.
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Old 04-10-2008, 08:30 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RH1 View Post
Thanks for that!

So hang on, what's Alkyd paint? See this is where I get all confused...

Yeah we have matt, silk and... well, gloss I suppose. I don't think I've ever seen anything shinier than silk effect for walls. I just use high gloss stuff on skirting boards (oh GOD, what are they called there???? This just gets more and more complicated... the things that go around the bottom of your walls...) and door frames.

Of course there's new stuff coming out all the time - my OH just used water-based stuff on his woodwork, which sounds like a God-send. My house smells of white spirit (solvent - mixture of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic C7 to C12 hydrocarbons with a maximum content of 25% of C7 to C12 alkyl aromatic hydrocarbons - what do you call that then? ) terribly at the moment.
Alkyd is oil base paint for Exteriors. Most just call it Exterior and they know you want an oil base. The wood Sealer is called Varnish or Shellac.

When we paint Apartments or Flats as you call em we usually paint the Bathroom and Kitchens Flat paint and the rest of the apartment Semi Gloss paint. Only bad thing about Flat is it shows fingerprints and dirt real easy where as the Semi Gloss or Gloss hides it better. But it's a personal choice amongst most.

Around the bottom of the walls is called the mostly Baseboards or Wallcove. The strip between the Bathtub and Floor Tile is the Tubcove.

6/3
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Old 04-10-2008, 08:40 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
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I have a question ???? What about accents in the U.K. I know we have a standard American accent that we and you in the U.K. can distinguish. But i can tell when someone from the USA South talks to me or the Texas accent or the New York/New Jersey accent etc...

Are there different accents in the U.K. Do the Scots sound different or the Northern Englanders sound different to the Southerners or those in Wales sound different to those in London etc...Can you tell when someone in the U.K. walks up to you and starts talkiing that you think to yourself ....yeap he/she is from the Northern part or Southern part of the country just by their accent.

6/3
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Old 04-10-2008, 09:56 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,226,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
I have a question ???? What about accents in the U.K. I know we have a standard American accent that we and you in the U.K. can distinguish. But i can tell when someone from the USA South talks to me or the Texas accent or the New York/New Jersey accent etc...

Are there different accents in the U.K. Do the Scots sound different or the Northern Englanders sound different to the Southerners or those in Wales sound different to those in London etc...Can you tell when someone in the U.K. walks up to you and starts talkiing that you think to yourself ....yeap he/she is from the Northern part or Southern part of the country just by their accent.

6/3
Wow you're going to get a gazillion responses to that! I'm sure there has been a thread that veered into this topic somewhere but the short answer is "Yes, hundreds." Accents like Welsh or Scottish are easily as different to mine as the American accent is, really - and I guess it's not surprising as they've evolved from different languages.

Lots of cities and their immediate vicinities have very distinctive accents that even foreigners can recognise sometimes. For example Newcastle, Liverpool, Birmingham and Bristol all have very distinctive accents.

You can distinguish more closely if you live there, for example someone from Birmingham can tell you instantly if someone is from Wolverhampton, which is less than 20 miles away. I can spot a Nottingham accent, and in turn a Mansfield accent and they're only 30 or so miles from here.

Scotland has lots of different accents within itself, which I'm sure people on here will tell you about. I think I can distinguish Glasgow from Edinburgh.

Again - Welsh accent is easy to spot if you don't live there but there are plenty of different versions of it too.

There are lots of different northern accents as well - Newcastle and its surrounding area is totally different to say Leeds, which is different to Sheffield... although Sheffield and Leeds aren't very far away from each other. I think most people can spot "Yorkshire" but the varieties within Yorkshire are harder to spot unless you live there. The Yorkshire accent also has similarities the Lancashire accent, although Manchester is quite distinctive (don't be fooled by Daphne off Frasier, it doesn't sound much like that... the accent she puts on there is kind of generic imitation "north"...)

Yes, in short. MASSIVE variety! If you've got a good ear you can pretty much guess the city they're nearest.

This is why a lot of "English" accents sound fake, because they have to be so fine-tuned to a certain area to be convincing - unless you want to sound like someone on the BBC news, which is sort of London-neutral.

I think Johnny Depp watched lots of Eastenders to perfect his accent for "From Hell" and even that slipped a bit sometimes.

Found the thread!: //www.city-data.com/forum/unite...d-accents.html

Last edited by RH1; 04-10-2008 at 10:13 AM.. Reason: Added thread link.
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Both coasts
1,574 posts, read 5,091,031 times
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I'm not British but I believe there are even more British-English variations than US-English ones, and the extent of the differences are particularly interesting in that there are often class-defined accents, and the accents can change so easily within a short distance (considering the UK's pop. density), whereas in the US, the sheer size of the country is such that unless you're in one of the biggest cities or a crossroads-type state like Missouri, you're unlikely to hear many different English variations at a given time. Meaning you rarely hear a Southern accent or a NorthEastern-type accent in WA, where I live. Accents in UK have less physical-distance implications
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Old 04-10-2008, 01:25 PM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
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Thanks RH1 and f1000 as that's really incredible to hear about as i would have never thought so.

Another question ....is any of the accents anywhere close to the american accent?? Like here in the states i'd say the Jersey or Boston Northeast accent would be the closest to what i consider British.

Also do the British conider American English like Vulgar English or non pure English?. I'm thinking about Latin as the Romans used to speak Latin but at the end of the empire and the first 100 years or so after the collapse with all the waves of Germanic peoples it changed to Vulgar Latin. Do you kind of get what i'm saying on this??

6/3
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