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Old 04-10-2008, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,169 posts, read 24,326,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
I have a question ???? What about accents in the U.K. I know we have a standard American accent that we and you in the U.K. can distinguish. But i can tell when someone from the USA South talks to me or the Texas accent or the New York/New Jersey accent etc...

6/3
Yo. Please be careful to distinguish between the NORTH New Jersey and SOUTH New Jersey accents.

North New Jersey people drink wattah and say oh-kay and visit Noo Yawk.
South New Jersey people drink wudder and say el-kye and visit Fluffya.

El-kye?
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Old 04-10-2008, 06:51 PM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,616,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
Yo. Please be careful to distinguish between the NORTH New Jersey and SOUTH New Jersey accents.

North New Jersey people drink wattah and say oh-kay and visit Noo Yawk.
South New Jersey people drink wudder and say el-kye and visit Fluffya.

El-kye?
Just learned something new about my own country as i never knew that .
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Old 04-11-2008, 02:19 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,233,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
Thanks RH1 and f1000 as that's really incredible to hear about as i would have never thought so.

Another question ....is any of the accents anywhere close to the american accent?? Like here in the states i'd say the Jersey or Boston Northeast accent would be the closest to what i consider British.

Also do the British conider American English like Vulgar English or non pure English?. I'm thinking about Latin as the Romans used to speak Latin but at the end of the empire and the first 100 years or so after the collapse with all the waves of Germanic peoples it changed to Vulgar Latin. Do you kind of get what i'm saying on this??

6/3
Oooh interesting question. I might get bawled out on this, so anyone else feel free to disagree but here's my personal opinion.

I don't think American English would be considered a form of Vulgar English as much as ... God how do I phrase this tactfully... there isn't really a way.

Maybe it's going back to the "Chav" culture that's been discussed here on more than one occasion. //www.city-data.com/forum/unite...-system-3.html Certainly my perception of "vulgarised" English would that it has more to do with socio-economic status (call it class if you like - so shoot me) than Regional variations.

Basically, in the poorer bits of cities, the accents and dialects are more pronounced and misuses tend to spread, like people saying "More bigger than..." and "innit" - that kind of thing - if the parents say it, the kids say it too, and that's not dialect it's just... wrongness.

I personally don't consider regional dialects to be a vulgarisation, I think they're fascinating and a wonderful part of the country that would be a shame if they died out.

Nor do I consider American English to be a vulgarisation (apart from any bits that just seem wrong to me! ha ha ha ha) - it's just English that's evolved in a different direction. You can't stop language evolving, it's just a fact of life.

I'm not a linguist though, so it may be that "Vulgar" specifically relating to language has a particular definition that I'm not aware of.

Hey - something else occurred to me this morning. I was thinking about what defines an "English" accent to me, and thought that maybe it's the glottal stop (What is a glottal stop?)- the sort of swallowing-the-sound thing that we do instead of pronouncing the T (like at the end of "don't" when it runs into another word). Then I realised that the Welsh accent and Liverpool accents don't do that at all, they almost slightly slur the Ts - like sort of bouncing over them instead of stopping them - they're almost Ss. So what is it that makes an English accent English? Gosh that's a difficult question if ever there was one....
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Old 04-11-2008, 07:09 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,058,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
I have a question ???? What about accents in the U.K. I know we have a standard American accent that we and you in the U.K. can distinguish. But i can tell when someone from the USA South talks to me or the Texas accent or the New York/New Jersey accent etc...

Are there different accents in the U.K. Do the Scots sound different or the Northern Englanders sound different to the Southerners or those in Wales sound different to those in London etc...Can you tell when someone in the U.K. walks up to you and starts talkiing that you think to yourself ....yeap he/she is from the Northern part or Southern part of the country just by their accent.

6/3
Do the Welsh sound different to Londoners or Scots?

O yes - and they all love to joke about each others' accents.

Here's a bit of Welsh for you...well...Scottish doing Welsh



YouTube - Absolutely - Denzil
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Old 04-12-2008, 12:37 AM
 
Location: PERTH AUSTRALIA
38 posts, read 149,695 times
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OH, I hope none of us in any part of the UK lose our accents.They are an integeral part of our Island!
Wales is a tiny country.I am from South Wales and have a strong Welsh accent. I can tell the difference between people from North Wales and South Wales as most Britons can. I can also identify a West Walian. Not only that, I can tell a valley accent from a Cardiff accent easily and a Cardiff accent from a Newport accent (a distance of under 10 miles!!) I could go on!!!!
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Old 04-14-2008, 08:03 PM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,616,833 times
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Heck since i've been alive i noticed phrases changing already as when i was a kid in the 70's as if you mentioned something in an historical conversation or setting.... you would have said something kinda like '' A long time ago'' and then i remember people back in the 80's saying ''Way back when'' and now it's said ''Back in the day'' .....am i correct fellow americans ??

I'm sure there are other words or phrases but that's the one phrase that sticks out to me. Anyway not sure about Britain.

6/3
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Old 04-14-2008, 08:25 PM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,058,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6/3 View Post
Heck since i've been alive i noticed phrases changing already as when i was a kid in the 70's as if you mentioned something in an historical conversation or setting.... you would have said something kinda like '' A long time ago'' and then i remember people back in the 80's saying ''Way back when'' and now it's said ''Back in the day'' .....am i correct fellow americans ??

I'm sure there are other words or phrases but that's the one phrase that sticks out to me. Anyway not sure about Britain.

6/3
(In UK) We'd usually say, "back in the good old days" - as of course it was always better way back when!

Hey 6 foot 3 - you've changed your name! I remember your old name, back in the ......
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Old 04-15-2008, 02:32 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,233,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
(In UK) We'd usually say, "back in the good old days" - as of course it was always better way back when!

Hey 6 foot 3 - you've changed your name! I remember your old name, back in the ......
Lol - very observant and topical.

I think it depends on the individual. I'm not sure what I say for that - probably "years ago" just going back 10 to 15 years or "when I was little" going back much further. I hear all the phrases that have been mentioned though.
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Old 04-15-2008, 04:28 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,616,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post

Hey 6 foot 3 - you've changed your name! I remember your old name, back in the ......
You have me laughing on that one Southdown...lol... . Sadly we are a Ghetto or ''Hood'' (new term) nation in America. So i shouldn't be surprised that ''back in the day'' we spoke almost exactly like the Brits when they were here and then all the intermingling with other Immigrants and also with the Indians or Native Americans and Mexicans out west have created new words or phrases. I read once about how many current English words we use in America that are not actually English but either Spanish or of the different Native Tribes across this nation.
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Old 04-15-2008, 09:20 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,058,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6/3 View Post
You have me laughing on that one Southdown...lol... . Sadly we are a Ghetto or ''Hood'' (new term) nation in America. So i shouldn't be surprised that ''back in the day'' we spoke almost exactly like the Brits when they were here and then all the intermingling with other Immigrants and also with the Indians or Native Americans and Mexicans out west have created new words or phrases. I read once about how many current English words we use in America that are not actually English but either Spanish or of the different Native Tribes across this nation.
America certainly is a melting pot of languages and accents. I'd love to know where some of the sounds originated from.

Sometimes when I hear a real New Yorker I swear I can hear a bit of Irish and Liverpool in there, amongst the Italian and Yiddish!

That makes sense too, as does the Danish sounds and 'yah' around Minnesota etc. But where does the Southern accent originate from??
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