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Old 04-15-2008, 10:32 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,226,267 times
Reputation: 577

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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
America certainly is a melting pot of languages and accents. I'd love to know where some of the sounds originated from.

Sometimes when I hear a real New Yorker I swear I can hear a bit of Irish and Liverpool in there, amongst the Italian and Yiddish!
Interesting you should say that - I've always thought Irish and scouse were the closest accents to north American, certainly east coast, and it does kind of make sense doesn't it, being the ports on that side. Presumably there have been a fair amount of sailors deciding not to go home over the years..
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Old 04-15-2008, 11:15 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
But where does the Southern accent originate from??
Here you go as this thread was started on the history forum
//www.city-data.com/forum/histo...rn-accent.html

Secondly i saw a few weeks back on the History Channel about the origins of the American ''Hillbilly'' and saying they originated from Scotland. Here's a good site about them.
Scottish Hillbillies and Rednecks, Scotland - UK History.

Tell me what you ''ya'lls'' thought of the Scots being the forebearers of the American Southern Accent.
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Old 04-15-2008, 12:02 PM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,226,267 times
Reputation: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6/3 View Post
Here you go as this thread was started on the history forum
//www.city-data.com/forum/histo...rn-accent.html

Secondly i saw a few weeks back on the History Channel about the origins of the American ''Hillbilly'' and saying they originated from Scotland. Here's a good site about them.
Scottish Hillbillies and Rednecks, Scotland - UK History.

Tell me what you ''ya'lls'' thought of the Scots being the forebearers of the American Southern Accent.
That other thread is interesting - didn't read it all but the first few posts were informative. I can very much see the black patois influence but I'm struggling to find much scottish in there. Although.... "Mah" for "my"? That sounds quite scottish.

I love how they say "hayowse" for "house" but where did that come from???
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Old 04-15-2008, 12:19 PM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,030,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6/3 View Post
Here you go as this thread was started on the history forum
//www.city-data.com/forum/histo...rn-accent.html

Secondly i saw a few weeks back on the History Channel about the origins of the American ''Hillbilly'' and saying they originated from Scotland. Here's a good site about them.
Scottish Hillbillies and Rednecks, Scotland - UK History.

Tell me what you ''ya'lls'' thought of the Scots being the forebearers of the American Southern Accent.
Jeez, 6/3, could you stop with the interesting posts - I'm trying to do some work here!!!

I was watching Gone with the Wind for the gazillionth time recently, and thought how the Southern accent seemed so much more pronounced in the black actors, and more in the women than the men. Obviously it's a movie and not real life - but how realistic or authentic is it, accent-wise?

The thread you posted mentions how well-off white children who were often brought up with black nurses would pick up the black patois, and that affected girls more - as boys were sent off to school where they were taught a more Northern accent. Fascinating stuff, y'all.
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Old 04-15-2008, 03:01 PM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,510,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
Fascinating stuff, y'all.
Yeap if i ever here the Brits saying with their British accent ''Ya'll come on ova yonda now ya hear'' i think i'd lose it....lol....

Also was wondering what you guys thought about Mel Gibson's accent in Braveheart....was it fake sounding or did he speak it well??

Amother phrase that has changed since the 70's here is if someone is talking about or showing you something really interesting you would have said ''Wow that's neat'' then in the 80's you would have said ''Wow that's cool'' and now you may say ''Wow how trippin''.

6/3
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Old 04-15-2008, 10:16 PM
 
Location: PERTH AUSTRALIA
38 posts, read 149,520 times
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If anyone is really interested they should get hold of the book
'The MotherTongue' (English and how it got that way) by Bill Bryson.
It is absolutely facsinating, explains the evolution of the English language, and there is even a chapter 'Old World New World' which explains the path the language has taken in America since the Pilgrims landed!
Many words and phrases used in the South actually derive from Olde English e.g. 'Ye All' which have long died out in Britain itself!!
This book is very enjoyable,not a heavy read, and is most enlightening!
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Old 04-16-2008, 03:12 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,226,267 times
Reputation: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6/3 View Post
Yeap if i ever here the Brits saying with their British accent ''Ya'll come on ova yonda now ya hear'' i think i'd lose it....lol....

Also was wondering what you guys thought about Mel Gibson's accent in Braveheart....was it fake sounding or did he speak it well??
6/3
I didn't see the whole film but from clips I've seen it looks fairly poor! Scottish accents are hard to do well though I think. I'm not bad at a lot of accents but I don't even try a scottish one, I'm just awful at it.

I love the Southern American accent, there's something hypnotic about it. We get Grace Under Fire on Paramount here every now and then and I'm sure I watch it for the accent as much as the comedy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by salopian View Post
If anyone is really interested they should get hold of the book
'The MotherTongue' (English and how it got that way) by Bill Bryson.
It is absolutely facsinating, explains the evolution of the English language, and there is even a chapter 'Old World New World' which explains the path the language has taken in America since the Pilgrims landed!
Many words and phrases used in the South actually derive from Olde English e.g. 'Ye All' which have long died out in Britain itself!!
This book is very enjoyable,not a heavy read, and is most enlightening!
I've got that at home and I've read about half of it. It hasn't got to the American bit yet (I don't think - unless my memory is failing) so maybe it's time to pick it up again. I echo your recommendation anyway, really interesting stuff.
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Old 04-16-2008, 03:14 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,226,267 times
Reputation: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
Jeez, 6/3, could you stop with the interesting posts - I'm trying to do some work here!!!
I hear ya sister... lol
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Old 04-16-2008, 06:57 AM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,030,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RH1 View Post
I've got that at home and I've read about half of it. It hasn't got to the American bit yet (I don't think - unless my memory is failing) so maybe it's time to pick it up again. I echo your recommendation anyway, really interesting stuff.
Same here - I thought I'd read it but I must have stopped half-way. I just remember the bit at the beginning about signs badly translated into English, a road sign or something in Japan saying "trumpet him melodiously and tootle him with vigour".
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Old 04-16-2008, 08:28 AM
RH1
 
Location: Lincoln, UK
1,160 posts, read 4,226,267 times
Reputation: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
Same here - I thought I'd read it but I must have stopped half-way. I just remember the bit at the beginning about signs badly translated into English, a road sign or something in Japan saying "trumpet him melodiously and tootle him with vigour".
I had an e-mail with a ton of those in a while ago, they were so funny. Apologies for the length of this and the caps but it's worth it...

Cocktail lounge, Norway:
LADIES ARE REQUESTED NOT TO HAVE CHILDREN IN THE BAR.

At a Budapest zoo:
PLEASE DO NOT FEED THE ANIMALS. IF YOU HAVE ANY SUITABLE FOOD, GIVE IT TO THE GUARD ON DUTY.

Doctor's office, Rome:
SPECIALIST IN WOMEN AND OTHER DISEASES.

Hotel, Acapulco:
THE MANAGER HAS PERSONALLY PASSED ALL THE WATER SERVED HERE.

Booklet about using a hotel air conditioner, Japan:
COOLES AND HEATES: IF YOU WANT CONDITION OF WARM AIR IN YOUR ROOM, PLEASE CONTROL YOURSELF.

Car rental brochure, Tokyo:
WHEN PASSENGER OF FOOT HEAVE IN SIGHT, TOOTLE THE HORN. TRUMPET HIM MELODIOUSLY AT FIRST, BUT IF HE STILL OBSTACLES YOUR PASSAGE
THEN TOOTLE HIM WITH VIGOUR.

In a Nairobi restaurant:
CUSTOMERS WHO FIND OUR WAITRESSES RUDE OUGHT TO SEE THE MANAGER.

On the grounds of a private school:
NO TRESPASSING WITHOUT PERMISSION.

On an Athi River highway:
TAKE NOTICE: WHEN THIS SIGN IS UNDER WATER, THIS ROAD IS IMPASSABLE.

On a poster at Kencom:
ARE YOU AN ADULT THAT CANNOT READ? IF SO, WE CAN HELP.

In a City restaurant:
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK, AND WEEKENDS TOO.

One of the Mathare buildings:
MENTAL HEALTH PREVENTION CENTRE.

A sign seen on an automatic restroom hand dryer:
DO NOT ACTIVATE WITH WET HANDS.

In a Pumwani maternity ward:
NO CHILDREN ALLOWED.

In a cemetery:
PERSONS ARE PROHIBITED FROM PICKING FLOWERS FROM ANY BUT THEIR OWN GRAVES.

Tokyo hotel's rules and regulations:
GUESTS ARE REQUESTED NOT TO SMOKE OR DO OTHER DISGUSTING BEHAVIOURS IN BED.

On the menu of a Swiss restaurant:
OUR WINES LEAVE YOU NOTHING TO HOPE FOR.

In a Bangkok temple:
IT IS FORBIDDEN TO ENTER A WOMAN EVEN A FOREIGNER IF DRESSED AS A MAN.

Hotel room notice, Chiang-Mai, Thailand:
PLEASE DO NOT BRING SOLICITORS INTO YOUR ROOM.

Hotel brochure, Italy:
THIS HOTEL IS RENOWNED FOR ITS PEACE AND SOLITUDE. IN FACT, CROWDS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD FLOCK HERE TO ENJOY ITS SOLITUDE.

Hotel lobby, Bucharest:
THE LIFT IS BEING FIXED FOR THE NEXT DAY. DURING THAT TIME WE REGRET THAT YOU WILL BE UNBEARABLE.

Hotel elevator, Paris:
PLEASE LEAVE YOUR VALUES AT THE FRONT DESK.

Hotel, Yugoslavia:
THE FLATTENING OF UNDERWEAR WITH PLEASURE IS THE JOB OF THE CHAMBERMAID.

Hotel, Japan:
YOU ARE INVITED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE CHAMBERMAID.

In the lobby of a Moscow hotel across from a Russian Orthodox monastery:
YOU ARE WELCOME TO VISIT THE CEMETERY WHERE FAMOUS RUSSIAN AND SOVIET COMPOSERS, ARTISTS, AND WRITERS ARE BURIED DAILY EXCEPT THURSDAY.

Hotel catering to skiers, Austria:
NOT TO PERAMBULATE THE CORRIDORS IN THE HOURS OF REPOSE IN THE BOOTS OF ASCENSION.

Taken from a menu, Poland:
SALAD A FIRM'S OWN MAKE; LIMPID RED BEET SOUP WITH CHEESY DUMPLINGS IN THE FORM OF A FINGER; ROASTED DUCK LET LOOSE; BEEF RASHERS BEATEN IN THE COUNTRY PEOPLE'S FASHION.

Supermarket, Hong Kong:
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, WE RECOMMEND COURTEOUS, EFFICIENT SELF-SERVICE.

From the "Soviet Weekly":
THERE WILL BE A MOSCOW EXHIBITION OF ARTS BY 15,000 SOVIET REPUBLIC PAINTERS AND SCULPTORS. THESE WERE EXECUTED OVER THE PAST TWO YEARS.

In an East African newspaper:
A NEW SWIMMING POOL IS RAPIDLY TAKING SHAPE SINCE THE CONTRACTORS HAVE THROWN IN THE BULK OF THEIR WORKERS.

Hotel, Vienna:
IN CASE OF FIRE, DO YOUR UTMOST TO ALARM THE HOTEL PORTER.

A sign posted in Germany's Black Forest:
IT IS STRICTLY FORBIDDEN ON OUR BLACK FOREST CAMPING SITE THAT PEOPLE OF DIFFERENT SEX, FOR INSTANCE, MEN AND WOMEN, LIVE TOGETHER IN ONE TENT UNLESS THEY ARE MARRIED WITH EACH OTHER FOR THIS PURPOSE.

Hotel, Zurich:
BECAUSE OF THE IMPROPRIETY OF ENTERTAINING GUESTS OF THE OPPOSITE SEX IN THE BEDROOM, IT IS SUGGESTED THAT THE LOBBY BE USED FOR THIS PURPOSE.

An advertisement by a Hong Kong dentist:
TEETH EXTRACTED BY THE LATEST METHODISTS.

A laundry in Rome:
LADIES, LEAVE YOUR CLOTHES HERE AND SPEND THE AFTERNOON HAVING A GOOD TIME.

Tourist agency, former Czechoslovakia:
TAKE ONE OF OUR HORSE-DRIVEN CITY TOURS. WE GUARANTEE NO MISCARRIAGES.

The box of a clockwork toy made in Hong Kong:
GUARANTEED TO WORK THROUGHOUT ITS USEFUL LIFE.

In a Swiss mountain inn:
SPECIAL TODAY - NO ICE-CREAM.

Airline ticket office, Copenhagen:
WE TAKE YOUR BAGS AND SEND THEM IN ALL DIRECTIONS.

On the door of a Moscow hotel room:
IF THIS IS YOUR FIRST VISIT TO THE USSR, YOU ARE WELCOME TO IT.

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