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Old 03-18-2015, 03:41 PM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
26,648 posts, read 28,516,169 times
Reputation: 50473

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
Interesting and how some slang words are misinterpreted... I just mentioned a word for a slack full back jacket we wore in the 70s but and old style from the forties, which it seems in the US is offensive.. so I looked it up. and it has other meanings too... so now I know not to use it.. although it means nothing here in the UK except for this jacket name... then I told someone their photo was a cracker in a PM meaning really cool... and they were offended...so we struggle from this end too hahaha.
Oh no. Now I want to know what that word is. A word for a jacket. Can you tell us? Or would it get censored?
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Old 03-18-2015, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Scotland
7,964 posts, read 11,816,823 times
Reputation: 4167
Yep a fanny pack is a little different here!

States

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Fanny_Pack.jpg

UK

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwpp-THRH-4
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Old 03-18-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
18,457 posts, read 18,609,598 times
Reputation: 28527
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I'm dying to know what that word is.
well when I looked it up it said.... a measure of whisky, a person who dances a ***.The chigoe flea , I didnt know the racist slur one.. only the name of a short swing jacket I used to wear..and very popular they were too.
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Old 03-18-2015, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
67,652 posts, read 60,458,744 times
Reputation: 101034
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
well when I looked it up it said.... a measure of whisky, a person who dances a ***.The chigoe flea , I didnt know the racist slur one.. only the name of a short swing jacket I used to wear..and very popular they were too.
Surely it's not a ***!

It is - it is! I have never heard that word used in a racist or offensive way! I can't believe it.
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Old 03-18-2015, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,118 posts, read 29,497,086 times
Reputation: 8819
A jig? I've never heard it used in a racist manner. I don't even know what it means. How bizarre.
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Old 03-18-2015, 08:14 PM
 
22,923 posts, read 15,403,226 times
Reputation: 16962
It's a derivative and contraction of "Jigaboo". Popular in the fifties.
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Old 03-19-2015, 08:00 AM
 
Location: rural south west UK
5,371 posts, read 3,560,254 times
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new one to me.
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Old 03-20-2015, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
18,457 posts, read 18,609,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
It's a derivative and contraction of "Jigaboo". Popular in the fifties.
I never knew or used that word... not the name of the jacket though... like "bigger" ...
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Old 03-21-2015, 09:42 AM
 
2,807 posts, read 6,409,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josie13 View Post
I travel quite a bit to the UK and watch a lot of British TV and cinema while home in the US, so I'm used to regional accents. Today, the main peculiarity of speech that still jumps out at me (in some regions of England anyway) is the insertion of an "r" linking sound between a word that ends in a vowel and a word that starts with a vowel. When I first went to London, this pronunciation startled me. I'd hear it in the streets and in the speech of news presenters. I was baffled by why news presenters were saying "Obamar" instead of Obama, for example. Then I worked out the pattern:

It's Obama, China, India, and so on, if the next word begins with a consonant. But if the next word begins with a vowel, it's changed to "Chinar and..." or "Obamar and..." It drove me nuts because I could see no purpose. When I got home, I looked it up, and found it was a well-known phenomenon called the "intrusive r."

That's the Idear: Intrusive 'R' | Dialect Blog

So that's why people in London, for example, say "law court" as expected, but pronounce "lawr and order" with the intrusive r to link the "a" of "law" and the "a" of "and." I've learned that this pronunciation used to be disapproved of, generations ago, but now almost everyone in the region uses the intrusive r and thinks nothing of it. It still sounds jarring to my ear.
I think that phenomenon used to occur in the Boston accent too, although it's probably fading now.
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Old 03-21-2015, 10:01 PM
 
Location: England.
1,287 posts, read 3,315,968 times
Reputation: 1293
Quote:
Originally Posted by salopian View Post
If anyone is really interested they should get hold of the book
'The MotherTongue' (English and how it got that way) by Bill Bryson.
It is absolutely facsinating, explains the evolution of the English language, and there is even a chapter 'Old World New World' which explains the path the language has taken in America since the Pilgrims landed!
Many words and phrases used in the South actually derive from Olde English e.g. 'Ye All' which have long died out in Britain itself!!
This book is very enjoyable,not a heavy read, and is most enlightening!
Mother Tongue is an entertaining read, as you would expect from Bill Bryson, but is full of basic inaccuracies. From claiming the French say "Être de Birmingham" for anything boring, to some rather fantastic claims for the unique ability of English to express some rather mundane human emotions.

He starts from the premise that if history had been different then the wonderful unique language of English would not have developed (true). But then seems to infer this would have been a terrible thing for humanity, and those peoples forced to adopt it (untrue). Without English we and our former empire would just be speaking some other equally wonderful tongue.

As for the very original post, how can someone be confused about English, and not able to resolve the confusion by context or using Google? I have never struggled with American or Australian TV programmes.
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