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Old 04-03-2008, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,170 posts, read 24,229,874 times
Reputation: 15284

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Well, I followed the advice of some nice people here whom I asked about ways for an American to experience British cultural humor (oops, humour) and I subscribed to and have been receiving "Private Eye" for nearly a month, and frankly I think I'm getting about 20% of the content on a good day.

Questions:

1. What does it mean when "bloody hell" is spelled "bleddy hell"?

2. What is a "busker"?

3. Please translate: "Why Patricia Hewitt has turned into Norman Tebbit ."

4. What, after all, does "pip pip" actually mean?

Thanks awfully.

--- Yr Ameddican cousin, Yeledaf
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Old 04-03-2008, 02:33 PM
 
238 posts, read 622,669 times
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1. I think it's just a colloquial/phonetic spelling.
2. A busker is a street musician/entertainer.
3. Patricia Hewitt is a Labour MP and Cabinet Minister; Norman Tebbitt was a Conservative MP and Cabinet Minister. Presumably your reference indicates a view of Ms. Hewitt abandoning her principles.
4. No idea.
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Old 04-03-2008, 02:57 PM
 
2,421 posts, read 6,940,001 times
Reputation: 3861
"Pip-Pip", Basically equals "Bye-Bye"(Goodbye)...Pip-Pip Cheerio!
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Old 04-03-2008, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,170 posts, read 24,229,874 times
Reputation: 15284
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kangaroofarmer View Post
"Pip-Pip", Basically equals "Bye-Bye"(Goodbye)...Pip-Pip Cheerio!
Fair dinkum.
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Old 04-03-2008, 03:17 PM
 
2,421 posts, read 6,940,001 times
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Too Right Mate!

Though Australian slang might require an entirely different thread? Hehe
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Old 04-03-2008, 03:20 PM
 
3,367 posts, read 11,028,737 times
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Pronouncing "bloody hell" (with the 'oo' sounding like 'u') as "bleddy hell" would be a posh, upper class, jolly-hockey-sticks type of pronunciation.

As in "Bleddy hell, old boy, that was frightfully good, jolly well done! Pip pip!"

Pip pip is another upper-class type expression, meaning goodbye, but why...no idea

A dictionary of slang - "P" - Slang and colloquialisms of the UK. this is useful....
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Old 04-03-2008, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,170 posts, read 24,229,874 times
Reputation: 15284
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kangaroofarmer View Post
Too Right Mate!

Though Australian slang might require an entirely different thread? Hehe
Thanks! Keep up the good work down under.

Love those female lifeguards on Bondi Beach...
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Old 04-03-2008, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,170 posts, read 24,229,874 times
Reputation: 15284
Quote:
Originally Posted by southdown View Post
Pronouncing "bloody hell" (with the 'oo' sounding like 'u') as "bleddy hell" would be a posh, upper class, jolly-hockey-sticks type of pronunciation.

As in "Bleddy hell, old boy, that was frightfully good, jolly well done! Pip pip!"

Pip pip is another upper-class type expression, meaning goodbye, but why...no idea

A dictionary of slang - "P" - Slang and colloquialisms of the UK. this is useful....
"jolly-hockey-sticks" LOL / Love you guys....

Great new national slogan I recently read: "Britain -- Come for the climate, stay for the dentistry!"

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Old 04-03-2008, 04:24 PM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,503,152 times
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O.K. i have an British to American English term question. Back in 2006 during the congressional mid term elections i decided to watch all the coverage on BBC World instead of our American stations and the ''LINES'' where people were waiting to vote were long and so the British tv reporters were saying words/phrases like ''as you can see the QUEUES'' are long'' etc.. and i was like what?? I was thinking what does this word mean??? So i quickly realized that the British term ''QUEUE'' means ''LINE'' over here in the states correct?? So that is an British term that i have never heard of before the British election coverage so i wonder what other terms are totally different......
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Old 04-03-2008, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
20,170 posts, read 24,229,874 times
Reputation: 15284
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
O.K. i have an British to American English term question. Back in 2006 during the congressional mid term elections i decided to watch all the coverage on BBC World instead of our American stations and the ''LINES'' where people were waiting to vote were long and so the British tv reporters were saying words/phrases like ''as you can see the QUEUES'' are long'' etc.. and i was like what?? I was thinking what does this word mean??? So i quickly realized that the British term ''QUEUE'' means ''LINE'' over here in the states correct?? So that is an British term that i have never heard of before the British election coverage so i wonder what other terms are totally different......
I know a few:

truck / lorry
apartment / flat
auto hood / bonnet
windshield / windscreen
for rent / for hire
charge purchase / hire purchase
flashlight / torch
railroad conductor / guard
drunk / blotto
knocked up / preggers
put together quickly / knocked up!

And if you really want to knock yourself out....

British, Canadian and American Vocabulary - A
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