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Old 10-06-2012, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
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Cincinnati will be the first in the states to get a streetcar system that has a specific european style to it that no other city has.
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Old 10-06-2012, 10:50 PM
 
567 posts, read 973,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forever200 View Post
Does Portland or Seattle compare to Europeans cities?
Portland sure does. I flew into there once, and the light rail picked up literally 30 yards from the baggage carousel. As in, 20 seconds after I grabbed my suitcase, I was standing at the stop. 20 measly seconds!

I flew into Seattle and I had to schlep my suitcase about half a mile to get to the train stop.
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Old 10-08-2012, 09:33 PM
 
1,017 posts, read 2,220,368 times
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NYC
San Fran
Chicago
Boston
DC
Philly
Seattle
Portland
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Old 10-08-2012, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Florida
7,438 posts, read 13,313,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalLord View Post
Portland sure does. I flew into there once, and the light rail picked up literally 30 yards from the baggage carousel. As in, 20 seconds after I grabbed my suitcase, I was standing at the stop. 20 measly seconds!

I flew into Seattle and I had to schlep my suitcase about half a mile to get to the train stop.

I took that Max train as it is called for six years. I took it from my job at the airport to Northwest Portland where I lived. There are very few transit systems in this country, that have a train that goes right into the airport like Portland's A train that goes all the way to downtown, and continues on to Beaverton every 15 minutes So it is nice and I appreciated it. Though some of the riders that would get on, as it made its way thru Portland left alot to be desired. I miss having a train and transit to get around on, as I no longer live in Portland. However I can't say I miss Portland and its weird culture and dreary climate at all.
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:26 AM
 
1,917 posts, read 1,113,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5Lakes View Post
Only New York City can match what is found in larger European cities. Places like Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Washington DC, Portland, and Philadelphia are decent enough to get around in without a car, but they are certainly behind large European cities. Other US cities beyond these have transit, but they are rather pathetic compared to Europe's cities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by forever200 View Post
What larger European cities you talking about?
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5Lakes View Post
Well, I can only speak for the cities I have been to. I have used the transit systems of these cities in Europe:

Madrid
Barcelona
Prague
Vienna
Munich
Nuremberg

I do know that comparable transit to these can be found in just about all large cities in Europe. London, Paris, Berlin and other top tier cities of course have top-notch transit systems. I live in Chicago without a car, so I know what it's like from the perspective of someone who lives in one of the best American cities for transit. Chicago's system is not up to par with the cities I have visited in Europe, except for maybe Nuremberg which is much smaller than Chicago. Actually most of those are smaller than Chicago, but trump it anyway.

If you want to include Canada, Montreal and Toronto have pretty good transit systems. Still not up to much of Europe's or NYC standards, but really good for North American.
I will add London, Amsterdam, Moscow, and Chelyabinsk to that list. Actually, ANY Russian city (I visited quite a few) has better public transport than almost every US city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Generally, denser, more compact cities are much more ideally suited to public transportation than less dense, expansive cities. Most European cities fit the former profile; most major North American cities, aside from New York, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Boston, and San Francisco (the inner cities, not the suburbs) fit the profile of the latter. This is largely because:

1) the more people per square mile, the more public transportation offerings it would make sense to provide: for example, in a city with 1,000 people per square mile, only bus service would be a sensible option to provide, and only at widely-spaced intervals. On the other hand, a (developed) city with 50,000 ppsm would be likely to have underground public transit.
2) traffic: generally, cities with higher densities experience more automotive traffic congestion. Since decisions on which transit mode to take are mainly shaped by how long it takes to get from point A to point B, denser cities win out (with subways, special bus lanes, etc.) over sparsely populated, more auto-friendly cities.
I think you've got the cart before the horse. When you have fixed public transit, like rail, the city around it GROWS to be more dense, with higher re-use of buildings and higher occupancy. The Tri-State Planning Commission figured that out in NYC/Jersey area some time back, in part because the NYC tri-state area has traditionally had better public transit. When you focus on highways, you get inner-city abandonment. Generally speaking of course, as other geographic considerations also come into play. One of the reasons that so many cities in the US experienced sprawl and urban decay was BECAUSE they abandoned fixed transit in favor of the automobile and highways.
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Florida
7,438 posts, read 13,313,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cali3448893 View Post
Cincinnati will be the first in the states to get a streetcar system that has a specific european style to it that no other city has.

I thought Cincinnati was getting the same streetcars that Portland has. Portland I believe is the only American city, that now makes these European streetcars. I think the initial ones that run thru Portland came from Czechoslavakia. I could be wrong though.
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Old 10-10-2012, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
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NYC can definitely hold its own against any European city when it comes to public transportation.

Chicago and DC have good public transportation, but not quite up to the standard of European cities.

Boston has decent public transportation, but really not comparable to Europe.

SF and Philly..no way. Both cities have pretty pathetic public transportation when not judging by American standards.

Portland has a very nice system (aesthetically and technologically speaking), but most of the city is still extremely inconvenient to live in without having access to a car.
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Old 10-11-2012, 07:48 AM
 
Location: In the heights
27,539 posts, read 26,919,185 times
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For metros of their size, the only solid argument is for NYC. Chicago compared to a 9 million person metro or smaller in Europe looks pretty bad. For cities that might be okay compared to similar-sized European metros, Portland might make an okay if not really good showing. DC would be mediocre--and worse if considering it's a capital city.
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Old 10-11-2012, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,865,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayp1188 View Post
Portland has a very nice system (aesthetically and technologically speaking), but most of the city is still extremely inconvenient to live in without having access to a car.
I would disagree with the "most of the city" part of your statement. The 'burbs, sure. But they're not part of the city itself.
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Old 10-11-2012, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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New York is the only one that even comes close, but it's still behind the most major European systems. When you look at London, it's just astounding how expansive TfL is. You've got the Underground, obviously, which matches the New York Subway by itself, but then there's the DLR, the London Overground, Tramlink, Crossrail, ferry services, all those iconic buses, and even a big bike share system. Not to mention the gigantic gigantic network of commuter rail in and around Greater London. They've even just opened a cable car across the Thames in the Docklands.
And London is smaller than Los Angeles.

Once you get down to cities like Munich and Barcelona and Dublin, there are perhaps more US equals, but nothing here comes close to the big guys in Europe, and we certainly don't have anything to rival their commuter rail.
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