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Old 06-02-2011, 11:53 PM
 
262 posts, read 582,237 times
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Just out of curiosity, are any of you aware of government based psychiatric or physical health facilities located within or near public housing developments? Obviously, people who live in public housing aren't in the best financial state and most likely don't have medical care or other resources to turn to. Wouldn't it make sense to build government based facilities near public housing developments to assist individuals with specific needs that may not be readily available to them otherwise?

I also feel as though public schools, more specifically, elementary schools, as well as child care should be located in close proximity to public housing.


I apologize about the spelling and grammar errors; I'm writing this at 1:00AM.
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Old 06-03-2011, 12:02 AM
 
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Yes, a lot of public housing projects have had schools and health clinics as part of the project, since the WPA projects of the 1930s.
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Old 06-03-2011, 12:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Yes, a lot of public housing projects have had schools and health clinics as part of the project, since the WPA projects of the 1930s.

So, why are education rates still lower within minority groups? Also, healthcare is still an issue for many minorities, specifically black Americans. Many still are not receiving proper healthcare. (Yes, I am implying that many minorities, which include black Americans, live in public housing developments. Let us not be politically correct and hide noticeable facts.) How can this be the case if there supposedly are health clinics and other facilities which provide resources for the wellbeings of individuals who live in public housing? What is the deal?
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Old 06-03-2011, 07:01 AM
 
Location: NYC
7,258 posts, read 11,828,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beilua Rose View Post
So, why are education rates still lower within minority groups? Also, healthcare is still an issue for many minorities, specifically black Americans. Many still are not receiving proper healthcare. (Yes, I am implying that many minorities, which include black Americans, live in public housing developments. Let us not be politically correct and hide noticeable facts.) How can this be the case if there supposedly are health clinics and other facilities which provide resources for the wellbeings of individuals who live in public housing? What is the deal?
You sound more than a little naive.

The answer to your question is: Perhaps the solution you have thought to be the "silver bullet" was not actually so.

There are also minorities who do not live in public housing projects. Just making sure you were aware of that.
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Old 06-03-2011, 09:14 AM
 
8,385 posts, read 15,245,592 times
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Wow, you really took that idea and ran with it, didn't you?

Your statement is based on a number of wildly incorrect assumptions:

*That poverty and non-whiteness are necessarily correlated (they are not)
(The largest single group of people in poverty in the United States are whites.)
Source: http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comp...14&cat=1&sub=2
United States
White 26,494,800
Black 12,897,900
Hispanic 16,702,200
Other 4,844,10
*That all people in poverty are in public housing projects
(Only a small percentage of people in poverty are in public housing projects.)
*That all public housing projects have educational facilities
(You're taking the statement that some did to mean that they all do, which is not true. Some do, some don't. Some were built and have since been closed or demolished due to budget cuts. The fact that they do sometimes exist doesn't mean they are universal.)
*That those educational facilities are equal in quality and access to all other educational facilities
(Just because a housing project has, say, an elementary school does not mean that kids in that project have equal access to high schools and colleges. Maybe it's not true where you live, but generally "education" goes beyond the elementary school level.)
*That those medical facilities are equal in quality and access to other other medical facilities
(Again, the fact that some projects had them doesn't mean they are universal, and again, most people in poverty don't live in housing projects, so this should be obvious.)

Going into what is wrong with healthcare and education is a subject for another forum.

Last edited by wburg; 06-03-2011 at 09:26 AM..
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Old 06-03-2011, 10:44 AM
 
262 posts, read 582,237 times
Reputation: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Wow, you really took that idea and ran with it, didn't you?

Your statement is based on a number of wildly incorrect assumptions:

*That poverty and non-whiteness are necessarily correlated (they are not)
(The largest single group of people in poverty in the United States are whites.)
Source: Poverty Rate by Race/Ethnicity - Kaiser State Health Facts
United States
White 26,494,800
Black 12,897,900
Hispanic 16,702,200
Other 4,844,10
*That all people in poverty are in public housing projects
(Only a small percentage of people in poverty are in public housing projects.)
*That all public housing projects have educational facilities
(You're taking the statement that some did to mean that they all do, which is not true. Some do, some don't. Some were built and have since been closed or demolished due to budget cuts. The fact that they do sometimes exist doesn't mean they are universal.)
*That those educational facilities are equal in quality and access to all other educational facilities
(Just because a housing project has, say, an elementary school does not mean that kids in that project have equal access to high schools and colleges. Maybe it's not true where you live, but generally "education" goes beyond the elementary school level.)
*That those medical facilities are equal in quality and access to other other medical facilities
(Again, the fact that some projects had them doesn't mean they are universal, and again, most people in poverty don't live in housing projects, so this should be obvious.)

Going into what is wrong with healthcare and education is a subject for another forum.

Of course this is based out of assumptions. Why else would I ask the question to get more clarification. I'm just trying to figure out the racial and economic disparities within the country. I wasn't directly pointing to housing projects as the reason as to why disparities have not closed.
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Old 06-03-2011, 05:43 PM
 
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Why would medical facilities locate in public housing? There would be no profitable patients.
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Old 06-03-2011, 07:43 PM
 
8,385 posts, read 15,245,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Why would medical facilities locate in public housing? There would be no profitable patients.
The one I'm most familiar with is a small health clinic, public-funded, in a Depression-era housing project, with an elementary school on the other side. Typically such facilities are intended more for routine checkups and minor remedies, not a full-service hospital.
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Old 06-03-2011, 07:45 PM
 
Location: NYC
7,258 posts, read 11,828,554 times
Reputation: 3664
Pvande brings up a good point. Since we order our citizenry based on how much profit we can presumably extract from them, there's no wonder we have areas of this country stuck in multi-generational cycles of despair and poverty.
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
34,471 posts, read 63,798,088 times
Reputation: 57298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beilua Rose View Post
How can this be the case if there supposedly are health clinics and other facilities which provide resources for the wellbeings of individuals who live in public housing? What is the deal?
You can't force people to see a doctor, even if it's free.

The nonprofit I work for operates three nurse-managed clinics near public housing developments (two were once located inside housing developments; one development was razed, and the other clinic moved out of the housing development in order to expand and add dental services). The reasons the nurses find that people don't seek health care are lack of insurance/benefits; distrust of the medical profession and/or any kind of nonprofit; and ignorance of symptoms. The most skilled outreach workers on the planet have difficulty tearing down some of those barriers.
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