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Old 12-20-2011, 12:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Private automobile ownership in NYC and in most of Europe's major cities is less then 50%.
You can't just stop at the city limits, though. You'd have to include the entire NYC metro area to get a better picture of car dependency. And that would include much of Long Island, northeast New Jersey, southwest Connecticut, and a ways up the Hudson...
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Old 12-20-2011, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Urban density and transport-related energy consumption - Maps and Graphics at UNEP/GRID-Arendal

According to that, Melbourne's citizens seem to use their cars less than those of American cities. Btw, they used Toronto's city proper density, but the urban area (or maybe metropolitan area) density for other cities, which is why Toronto looks a little off.

But yeah, only a small part of Melbourne (downtown) is pedestrian oriented like that, most of the city and its suburbs are more like Los Angeles or San Francisco.
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Old 12-22-2011, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
Private automibile ownership in NYC and in most of Europe's major cities is less then 50%. Commuters much less (Around 20% for NYC). Those areas are not dependent on automobiles.
Private ownership, yes, I can see that. I was thinking more of all motorized road going vehicles in general, including taxis and other commercial vehicles.
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Old 12-31-2011, 07:28 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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I wonder what cities in the US already has an extensive system of alleyways that can be co-opted into pedestrian space. Chicago perhaps? Is that something that's doable?
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Old 12-31-2011, 08:24 PM
 
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Alleys tend to be de facto pedestrian space in a lot of cities--in downtown Sacramento there are some alleys that have been used that way for a long time, although in the past couple of years a few people have tried re-inventing the concept and claiming that they invented it. In "Old Sacramento" (a tourist area by the waterfront) there are a lot of restaurants with patio dining areas facing the alley (which, for other reasons, are a floor below street level and accessed via the building's basement.) A couple of businesses actually face the alley, including the semi-legendary "Backdoor Lounge":

Backdoor Lounge | Midtown Monthly

In Midtown, the "reinvention" process is focused on one block, where a bakery/coffee roaster set up in an alley warehouse became an ersatz coffee shop, and a developer built a tri-plex alley-loaded unit on the back half of a deep residential lot. A bike shop opened up next door, and some funds from the city provided permeable pavers on the alley itself. That project, and a couple of other alley-related projects past and present, are detailed in the article below:

Sacramento’s Alley Project: Why Small Is Beautiful - Sacramento Magazine - August 2011 - Sacramento, California
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Old 12-31-2011, 09:35 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 49,306,842 times
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I do love walking around Melbourne, it's an extremely walkable city and what's more feels pretty safe. The CBD square is easy to navigate and riddled with many laneways which adds another layer to explore in the city. Public transport coverage in Melbourne is excellent too. Of course this tends to apply to the CBD and inner suburbs, but I find the eastern and bayside suburbs not too bad for an Australian city.
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Old 01-04-2012, 06:17 PM
 
Location: In the heights
28,909 posts, read 28,057,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Alleys tend to be de facto pedestrian space in a lot of cities--in downtown Sacramento there are some alleys that have been used that way for a long time, although in the past couple of years a few people have tried re-inventing the concept and claiming that they invented it. In "Old Sacramento" (a tourist area by the waterfront) there are a lot of restaurants with patio dining areas facing the alley (which, for other reasons, are a floor below street level and accessed via the building's basement.) A couple of businesses actually face the alley, including the semi-legendary "Backdoor Lounge":

Backdoor Lounge | Midtown Monthly

In Midtown, the "reinvention" process is focused on one block, where a bakery/coffee roaster set up in an alley warehouse became an ersatz coffee shop, and a developer built a tri-plex alley-loaded unit on the back half of a deep residential lot. A bike shop opened up next door, and some funds from the city provided permeable pavers on the alley itself. That project, and a couple of other alley-related projects past and present, are detailed in the article below:

Sacramento’s Alley Project: Why Small Is Beautiful - Sacramento Magazine - August 2011 - Sacramento, California
It's awesome what they're doing in Sacramento--the city's really coming into its own as a great urban experience.

On the subject of alleys, I know that Chicago is sort of well known for the abundance of alleys it has. Like Melbourne, Chicago city blocks are huge, but full of alleys in order to cut through bits. Most of these alleys are used as service alleys for sanitation and the like, but I wonder if these can follow the same kind of usage scheme that Melbourne has with its alleys. Are there any Chicagoans here who can speak to this? Are there alleys in Chicago being used as pedestrian storefronts and the like?
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Old 01-15-2012, 09:00 AM
 
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For Australia, it seems like Melbourne is the best city for urban planning standards, which includes Walkability/Pedestrian friendliness.

Sydney is not that far behind and seems to be 2nd place. Brisbane probably is 3rd place. After those 3 places, most other places in Australia seem to be a lot less Walkable/Pedestrian Friendly.

That seems to be a similar case for cities/towns in Canada (Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver).

For the USA, there are more places with good Walkability/Pedestrian Friendliness such as 8 to 15 cities total. However, that is mostly because the USA is a bigger country with a much higher population.
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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With Canada, I would say that those 3 cities mostly just have bigger downtowns. Victoria, Quebec City and even Calgary are decently walkable and pedestrian friendly.

Anyways, there's a partnership that includes Gehl Architects who revitalized Melbourne's laneways that's looking into a laneway here in Toronto called O'Keefe Lane.
From garbage to greenery: revitalizing Toronto’s downtown laneways - The Globe and Mail

This is the laneway:
O'Keefe Lane, Toronto, ON - Google Maps

It runs behind theatres and stores mostly up to bustling Dundas Square.

A proposal for a 60 storey condo at the end of the laneway was recently proposed. In addition to the possibility of development funds going towards improvements to the laneway, the partnership responsible for this condo is the same as the one bringing Five St Joseph which will involve placing retail along Saint Nicholas Street (another laneway).
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Old 11-03-2013, 12:36 PM
 
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I spent 6 months in Melbourne several years ago and I would have stayed longer if I could as it really was a nice place.
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