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Old 10-29-2013, 08:22 PM
 
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I've been looking through Google Street Views of Los Angeles and notice a large difference between what the housing stock would say about the neighborhood's density and the actual statistics. Take a look at the Fairfax District for example. Mostly composed of single-family homes. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=fairf...272.18,,0,1.74 Fairfax is about 84.7% white and highly educated, so it can not be because 8+ poor families are stuffing themselves inside tiny apartments. Or Leimert Park, pop. density of around 9,800. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=leime...15.45,,0,10.14 It does not make sense.
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Old 10-29-2013, 08:33 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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The neighborhood's density isn't surprising nor that high from that view. 9000-10,000 ppsm is typical of detached homes on relatively small lots. I checked the census tracts your views are in:

Mapping the 2010 U.S. Census - NYTimes.com

[choose density under view more maps, then go all the way in]

The neighborhoods don't have much non-residential land, otherwise the numbers would be lower. Don't compare neighborhood densities to city densities.
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Old 10-29-2013, 08:39 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Similar densities are found in parts of Long Island. Tract is around 11k/sq mile.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Willi...58.33,,0,-3.93

a little more packed in:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Willi...,263.3,,0,1.39
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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This neighborhood in Dearborn, MI has 12,000 ppsm based on the map above.

http://goo.gl/maps/D0Px3

Though I imagine it's due to the few duplexes and row houses sprinkled in.

http://goo.gl/maps/1ep8c

http://goo.gl/maps/Wn7Ru
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:01 AM
 
12 posts, read 18,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by never-more View Post
I've been looking through Google Street Views of Los Angeles and notice a large difference between what the housing stock would say about the neighborhood's density and the actual statistics. Take a look at the Fairfax District for example. Mostly composed of single-family homes. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=fairf...272.18,,0,1.74 Fairfax is about 84.7% white and highly educated, so it can not be because 8+ poor families are stuffing themselves inside tiny apartments. Or Leimert Park, pop. density of around 9,800. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=leime...15.45,,0,10.14 It does not make sense.
Actually that area you're showing is not the fairfax district, this is a common neighborhood in fairfax
http://goo.gl/maps/2NLV9

File:Map of Fairfax district, Los Angeles, California.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

You can now see why the fairfax district has a decent density, the other area you're showing is called Carthay Carthay, Los Angeles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, it's a fairly high income neighborhood with 9,000 ppsm and more suburban in nature, the more you know
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Similar densities are found in parts of Long Island. Tract is around 11k/sq mile.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Willi...58.33,,0,-3.93

a little more packed in:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Willi...,263.3,,0,1.39
Long Island is a good example of LA, it is basically a packed in sprawling metro. The size of the LA metro is huge, I still remember flying over it on a clear day.
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Long Island is a good example of LA, it is basically a packed in sprawling metro. The size of the LA metro is huge, I still remember flying over it on a clear day.
Parts of Long Island are like some parts of Los Angeles, but overall I wouldn't say that Long Island looks that much like the higher-density or even medium density parts of Los Angeles. Long Island (obviously BK and Queens excluded) seems more like the South Bay and Gateway Cities, suburban but still relatively high-density for American suburbs.

Some of the suburban-appearing neighborhoods in Los Angeles can be deceiving - what looks like a SFH is in fact a duplex or sometimes even larger.
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Old 10-30-2013, 11:35 AM
 
1,380 posts, read 2,124,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Long Island is a good example of LA, it is basically a packed in sprawling metro. The size of the LA metro is huge, I still remember flying over it on a clear day.
I flew over LA at night once. Could not believe how the lights kept going on forever!
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 14,326,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The neighborhood's density isn't surprising nor that high from that view. 9000-10,000 ppsm is typical of detached homes on relatively small lots. I checked the census tracts your views are in:

Mapping the 2010 U.S. Census - NYTimes.com

[choose density under view more maps, then go all the way in]

The neighborhoods don't have much non-residential land, otherwise the numbers would be lower. Don't compare neighborhood densities to city densities.
Actually the Fairfax District includes the Pan Pacific Park, which is one of the larger "urban" parks embedded within Los Angeles. The Grove is also non-residential and takes up a large chunk of space within the Fairfax District.

As I mentioned above, part of the reason it is so "suburbanized" yet so dense is that many of these buildings that appear to be SFH are actually multifamily buildings. Plus even the apartment buildings sort of have a "suburban" aesthetic to them (generous set-backs, lots of stucco, architectural features that are typical of SFHs).

Additionally, the tiny lot sizes make these SFH's practically rowhouses: http://goo.gl/maps/sIAaG, http://goo.gl/maps/2llyn (Most of these are duplexes but a pretty good example of how packed in the buildings are)

Another thing that really adds to the density of Los Angeles, particularly in SFH neighborhoods is the backyard unit. Oftentimes what appears to be a SFH also has a small unit in the rear, basically doubling the density of the neighborhood. I think it is a pretty cool and unique feature Los Angeles has and something that makes a seemingly bucolic neighborhood quite a bit more vibrant and full of activity.

In other words, the theme of this post is "Los Angeles: Not Always As It Appears"
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 14,326,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastmemphisguy View Post
I flew over LA at night once. Could not believe how the lights kept going on forever!
I flew back from Chicago and went over LA at night last weekend, the metro is so vast that it took me a good 10 minutes before I could even figure out what part of the city we were flying over (ended up being the featureless Inland Empire, once we got over DTLA and environs it was a little easier to figure out).
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