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Old 02-21-2014, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Generally, they are more like Europe. But different too. Latin American cities often have PLAZAS which are popular places to go, much like a park, but more central located.

The biggest difference I've noticed with most Latin American cities is that the wealth is generally in the center, and the poor areas are much further out of the city, and the more into the hills it gets, the more poverty, as they have to walk up or down the hills to get into things.

It's the opposite of the U.S. where people have great infrastructure up into hills, and more money, and people with money do everything they can to get out of the cities in the u.s. So money goes outward and upward in the U.S.

In Latin American cities, the wealth wants to be where everything is at. But they'll have security in other ways. In general though, Latin American cities are generally way more walkable than American cities - except for a few Mexican cities near the border, who've taken on more American concepts of spread out urban planning.
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Old 02-21-2014, 06:23 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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European cities have such plazas as well, like this one in Lisbon:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...del_Rossio.JPG

Or this one in Setúbal:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...-17,_DD_01.JPG

Most European cities have pedestrian zones, squares, and municipal gardens...

Last edited by Neuling; 02-21-2014 at 06:35 PM..
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Old 02-21-2014, 06:23 PM
Status: "Autumn!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
Brazilian slums/shantytowns are called favelas.
Portuguese?
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Old 02-21-2014, 07:54 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
The biggest difference I've noticed with most Latin American cities is that the wealth is generally in the center, and the poor areas are much further out of the city, and the more into the hills it gets, the more poverty, as they have to walk up or down the hills to get into things.

It's the opposite of the U.S. where people have great infrastructure up into hills, and more money, and people with money do everything they can to get out of the cities in the u.s. So money goes outward and upward in the U.S.
Isn't that particularly because the infrastructure on the outskirts isn't very good? A lot of times they get informal (shantytowns) settlements on the edges without much services.
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Old 02-21-2014, 08:23 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Don't think Latin American cities are much like American ones, but they share certain "new world" charecteristics with some of the same contrasts between urban North America and Europe. Looking at Mexico City compared to Madrid, even though Mexico City is known as a high density city, its densest parts don't quite reach the densities found in the central areas of Madrid, and perhaps other southern European cities. Streets are wider, often with more of a setback, giving an impression of more space. Southern European cities often are lined with a wall of buildings at about the same height (usually 4-5 stories), Mexico City is less consistent. Here's a street in Madrid:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4018...bAew!2e0?hl=en

and a rather narrow street in an old part of the city

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4209...w2ig!2e0?hl=en

Mexico City is different:

https://www.google.com/maps/@19.4330...utxQ!2e0?hl=en

more of a mix of buildings, a bit more spaced out. And new high rises mixed in

https://www.google.com/maps/@19.4345...D4cw!2e0?hl=en
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Old 02-21-2014, 08:30 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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take a look at Rio. A pedestrianized street downtown looks a bit European but the buildings are rather tall:

https://www.google.com/maps/@-22.904...fcKA!2e0?hl=en

The "streetwall" of 15 or so story buildings is something that would fits in more with Manhattan than anything in Europe.

https://www.google.com/maps/@-22.903...ZlSA!2e0?hl=en

maybe this could fit in in southern Europe, dunno:

https://www.google.com/maps/@-22.969...kdtQ!2e0?hl=en

again some scattered tall buildings
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Old 02-21-2014, 08:39 PM
 
Location: East coast
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^^

That second view of Rio still seems to look like a form of Manhattan (even with those taxis) but with so little traffic (so few cars on that road)!
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Old 02-21-2014, 09:44 PM
 
358 posts, read 382,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Don't think Latin American cities are much like American ones, but they share certain "new world" charecteristics with some of the same contrasts between urban North America and Europe. Looking at Mexico City compared to Madrid, even though Mexico City is known as a high density city, its densest parts don't quite reach the densities found in the central areas of Madrid, and perhaps other southern European cities. Streets are wider, often with more of a setback, giving an impression of more space. Southern European cities often are lined with a wall of buildings at about the same height (usually 4-5 stories), Mexico City is less consistent. Here's a street in Madrid:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4018...bAew!2e0?hl=en

and a rather narrow street in an old part of the city

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4209...w2ig!2e0?hl=en

Mexico City is different:

https://www.google.com/maps/@19.4330...utxQ!2e0?hl=en

more of a mix of buildings, a bit more spaced out. And new high rises mixed in

https://www.google.com/maps/@19.4345...D4cw!2e0?hl=en
Here are some even denser parts of Mexico City. These look a little more Euro to me:

https://www.google.com/maps/@19.4319...OmtQ!2e0?hl=en

https://www.google.com/maps/@19.4319...k0-w!2e0?hl=en

https://www.google.com/maps/@19.4318...pPaA!2e0?hl=en
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Old 02-21-2014, 09:55 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
^^

That second view of Rio still seems to look like a form of Manhattan (even with those taxis) but with so little traffic (so few cars on that road)!
In São Paulo they have the huge Avenida Paulista:
https://www.google.com/maps?ll=-23.5...10.31&t=h&z=16

Or a photo:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jPeuO5hYGh...paulista01.jpg

We don't have something like that in Europe afaik. Maybe half a dozen cities have a few skyscrapers, but despite their higher height, São Paulo is much more massive due to the mere number of high-rise buildings. Apartment towers to the horizon, crazy:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-k-6Wfr1b1o...+in+Brazil.jpg
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Old 02-22-2014, 08:46 AM
 
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Many Latin American cities are like a hybrid of the two.

As in Europe:
They often have a dense center, where very wealthy people live, and most people work. There are lots of big businesses, banking corporations, government offices, cultural sites, cathedrals, high-end shopping, parks, restaurants, book stores, large boulevards. These centers are very pedestrian friendly, and mass transit is usually decent--especially subways.

As in the US:
They are often car oriented because they tend to be very large in area; thus the wealthy and middle class usually have cars. The city centers usually have sky-scrapers in abundance. Poor people tend to live on the periphery of the city center, or close to the center in occasional, small slum neighborhoods that receive poor services. The poor areas tend to have lots of class resentment and high crime. There are affluent suburbs for the wealthy and middle class who prefer to have more space, safety, and quiet. The suburbs are impractical and there is not much in the way of culture in them. People who live in those areas must travel to the center for work, and cultural activities like museums, theaters, etc.


Good examples of such cities are Mexico City, Sao Paulo, Rio, Bogota, Caracas.
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