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Old 05-04-2014, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Paris
8,156 posts, read 6,983,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Different in the sense as much narrower, or just a different style? 5th avenue has more trees northward, where it is busy and also a wealthier neighborhood (maybe connected?):
In the sense as much narrower. It's a one-way street, so only one lane for traffic, parking spaces on each side and narrow sidewalks. Maybe 40 feet wide in total. Buildings are about the same, mostly 2-story. Different architecture of course. Kinda like this but with an additional line of parked cars. More shops and pedestrians too.

I agree that #2 looks much more unpleasant than #6. If I'd have to choose between the two to take a leisurely stroll, I'd take the former. I ranked it below because the Queens Boulevard is better from a practical point of view.

The Queens blvd makes me think of this avenue:
https://maps.google.fr/maps?q=neuill...199.15,,0,6.13

It connects a motorway (A14) and a business district (La Défense) with Paris' inner beltway and the city center. Similar layout with the side roads. There are one subway and one RER line underneath. The wait at the middle island is unpleasant.

This is what they've done further west:
https://maps.google.fr/maps?q=neuill...2,99.9,,0,7.46

Tunnel for thru traffic:
https://maps.google.fr/maps?q=neuill...,74.95,,0,2.66
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Old 05-13-2014, 08:51 AM
 
33,276 posts, read 34,212,515 times
Reputation: 15660
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
There seem to be conflicting ideas on "walkability." For some it means sidewalks and crosswalks. For others it means destinations are in a short distance. For others it is based on street design.

So in your eyes, how would you define walkable?
I would say a combination of sidewalks and short distances between destinations are the most important factors in making a place walkable.
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Old 05-13-2014, 03:18 PM
 
4,137 posts, read 4,294,694 times
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I like Steve Mouzon's standards for walking. Sure, you can quibble with the details, but it's a pretty good baseline in my opinion.

Walk Appeal | the Original Green | Steve Mouzon
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Old 05-13-2014, 04:23 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: NYC
46,059 posts, read 43,533,329 times
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Here's two harder to classify views. One from Atlanta:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Lenox...6,,0,2.37&z=19

the second just outside Vancouver:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Vanco...06.94,,0,-1.35

They're both definitely urban in the sense of densely built up.
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Old 05-13-2014, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
29,051 posts, read 27,279,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
I like Steve Mouzon's standards for walking. Sure, you can quibble with the details, but it's a pretty good baseline in my opinion.

Walk Appeal | the Original Green | Steve Mouzon
Instinctually, I agree with what he says, but I wish there were more data to back what he's saying (not that I blame him for that...he's just an architect). The design of a walkable environment, though, is every bit as much art as it is science.
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Old 05-13-2014, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
29,051 posts, read 27,279,306 times
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This is what I call linear walkability/urbanity. You start out with a built environment that's more pedestrian-scaled.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Los+A...12,111.28,,0,0

But then you don't have to go too far before the built environment changes.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Los+A...157.5,,0,17.57

This is an example of a completely three dimensional built environment (in my view).

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=La+Ra...=12,240.2,,0,0

And it looks this way over many square miles.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=La+Ra...=12,85.77,,0,0
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Old 05-13-2014, 09:40 PM
 
104 posts, read 143,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Here's two harder to classify views.


the second just outside Vancouver:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Vanco...06.94,,0,-1.35

They're both definitely urban in the sense of densely built up.
There is a pedestrian bridge between that Skytrain Station and the mall (that portion of the mall is being rebuilt and will consist of several towers). So, unless you're a local resident or you need to go the library which is across the street from the mall, a lot of people going to the mall rarely uses those sidewalks.
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:55 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: NYC
46,059 posts, read 43,533,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Cul de sacs dead end rather than interconnect. They can make walking much longer than otherwise:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=M...sz=16&t=m&z=14

To two spots almost adjacent to each other
Streetsblog found an even more extreme example:

Sprawl Madness: Two Houses Share Backyard, Separated by 7 Miles of Roads | Streetsblog USA

Two houses whose backyards touch, but a road journey to them would be seven miles.
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:05 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: NYC
46,059 posts, read 43,533,329 times
Reputation: 14888
Sidewalks coming to some arterial roads in the area. They're on rather pedestrian unfriendly settings, but especially the route 9 one in Hadley gets a lot of college students walking on it.

Safe Crossing | The Recorder

Historically, sidewalks have been installed along state highways in conjunction with roadway reconstruction projects if requested by a community

Seems like MassDOT only puts sidewalks if requested. Maintenance and snow removal seem to be one of the reasons sidewalks aren't built.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:28 PM
 
4,020 posts, read 3,369,458 times
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Public squares and plazas, pedestrian-only and pedestrian-priority streets. One of the most important ingredients for walkability imo. Very common of course in European cities and towns but unfortunately rare to see in North America. When you do see them here they tend to be designed poorly. But when done well they serve as outdoor living rooms and social meeting places that people naturally gravitate to. They give you a goal and a destination to reach so you don't feel like you're just walking in circles. And when you get there you can take a rest and enjoy the simple pleasure of being in the company of other people in an informal casual atmosphere. Which is a natural human need. And the simple pleasure of being outdoors away from the noisy vehicle traffic. Some might say the internet is the modern equivalent of the public square or gathering place but its not the same thing. The internet serves a purpose but a poor substitute for real human interaction imo.
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