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Old 04-26-2014, 08:55 PM
 
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I remember in one of my sociology classes seeing statistics that most of the poverty in America was actually in rural areas and small towns.

I just see allowing communities in rural areas as bad. To some extent, you have to some rural living for the farmers. Then again, here in CA many of the wealthy farmers now have second homes in more urban and more desirable settings. The others left behind in the farming communities like the field workers live in areas with high crime and poverty. These communities are then gullible for Wal-Mart, prisons, and other institutions to come in just to get the jobs. Not to bash on the South, but look at how many prisons and Wal-Mart in rural and small towns you have with one of those nearby. What happens if we decide we can get field work done without field workers or a drought happens? With the push for sustainable farming, more people are getting pushed out of a job in rural America. Then you have many factories that closed due to greedy corporations and & hungry consumers outsourcing jobs of the USA. Not to mention, it costs more to get resources out to the rural areas. I remember stories of a lady who lost her job and had no car to get to the city and lived in a trailer out in the country and was forced to walk a long distance to a job at Burger King. How does that even exist in America???

If people live close to urban centers, and I'm not even saying push everyone to major cities but to push people close to metros with at least 125,000-150,000 population. Then people have access to social services, more socialization options, better healthcare, and public transportation and heck even the possible of biking to work.

I have lived in suburban part of a major city, a rural town, and have visited urban centers of many downtowns.

Living in the rural town was the worse. Except for my town, the region was mostly middle and working class people. The town people were not used to anything other than Caucasian similar minded people. The area slowly started going downhill and now it's rapidly going downhill. There are empty shopping centers, rising crime rates, and deteriorating roads. Cities are asking for tax sales increases and water is now a problem. The only reason my town was middle class and some upper middle class was the presence of a hospital, the lack of allowing more people to move there, and a good school district. More people in the rural area are commuting to the county seat where the urban center is for jobs. The south side of one of the towns is all sprawl for commuters to live there and be able to commute to the county seat for jobs.

Anyways, enough of my rant. My kids are going are not going to live in the same rural experience I lived in.
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Old 04-26-2014, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,038 posts, read 32,607,640 times
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Should we discourage rural living? No, but it does sound like rural living isn't right for you. As for tackling poverty within rural areas, that is a much more difficult question because there isn't a simple answer.
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Old 04-27-2014, 01:22 AM
 
Location: NYC
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You don't need to. Try to find a growing rural area. Rural towns have been emptying out for a long time.
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Old 04-27-2014, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
17,615 posts, read 19,576,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
You don't need to. Try to find a growing rural area. Rural towns have been emptying out for a long time.
Not in California. It drives Cal Fire nuts since there's so many new houses in fire risk areas.
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Old 04-27-2014, 09:42 AM
 
Location: NYC
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Not in California. It drives Cal Fire nuts since there's so many new houses in fire risk areas.
I wasn't talking about exurbs. I was talking about the middle US.
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Old 04-27-2014, 09:46 AM
 
2,916 posts, read 3,804,569 times
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So there it is. "Urban planners" aren't content with high density living for themselves - they need to herd others into it.

"Rural" housing is not the cause of the problems you speak of and you'll find everything you complained of and worse in cities. The same "corporations" you complain of are found in the cities PLUS the residents have to deal with the "greedy" local government and all the taxes needed to support the greedy public employee unions.
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Old 04-27-2014, 10:59 AM
 
8,543 posts, read 15,880,469 times
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"the city" is not an urban planner--or even an advocate for high-density living. I think his position is based on his occasionally weak grasp of the principle of cause and effect. So I wouldn't exactly call this a smoking gun for the Agenda 21 "force everyone into Soviet style apartment blocks" conspiracy theory you're looking for.
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Old 04-27-2014, 11:17 AM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
46,079 posts, read 47,778,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
You don't need to. Try to find a growing rural area. Rural towns have been emptying out for a long time.
New England rural areas, especially Western Massachusetts, grew at a fast clip from 1950 to 2000, but stagnated in the last decade. The rural areas emptied out drastically from 1840 to 1950 or so, some are still not back to early 19th century population levels.
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Old 04-27-2014, 11:18 AM
 
1,935 posts, read 2,808,011 times
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No offense but when I read this all I could think about is loss of freedom and the threat of governments controlling populations since they are congregated in population areas. It is absurd and borders on communism. Read some studies about health, crowding and the disintegration of societal morals when people are too tightly grouped together. Is this what is being contemplated in university sociology classes now adays !!
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Old 04-27-2014, 11:29 AM
 
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Actually, large urban populations are harder for governments to control than small rural populations. And "the city" isn't talking about crowding people into big cities--he is an advocate of suburban living.
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