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Old 03-06-2017, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Foursquares are a more common interwar housing typology, but there are plenty of bungalows here. Sears apparently had a kit house (which was this design) called the Pittsburgher.
Not the classic bungalow you see in the midwest and west.
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Old 03-06-2017, 01:33 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Not the classic bungalow you see in the midwest and west.
is this a classic bungalow? It's the only one I remember, at least off the top of my head. Probably a few others in the area; but they're rare enough they must have been custom built rather than mass produced. Assuming they are bungalows

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3304...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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Old 03-06-2017, 01:36 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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@escaton

any patterns that surprised you from my maps? Thought the housing history / regional patterns stuff would be something that you like
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Old 03-06-2017, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
is this a classic bungalow? It's the only one I remember, at least off the top of my head. Probably a few others in the area; but they're rare enough they must have been custom built rather than mass produced. Assuming they are bungalows

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3304...8i6656!6m1!1e1
Both of those fit the definition more than those Pittsburgh houses. I mean technically, those are bungalows, I guess, though I never heard that word used when I was a kid. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bungalow
"In North America and the United Kingdom a bungalow today is a residential building, normally detached, may contain small loft, which is either single-story or has a second story built into a sloping roof, usually with dormer windows (one-and-a-half stories)." Now, eschaton's houses fit the bold, but they're almost two stories, about 1 3/4.

//www.city-data.com/forum/denve...hoto-tour.html
See #3, 19, 24, 41 and other similar.
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Old 03-06-2017, 02:49 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Cape cods are often one and a half story with dormers and fit the wiki definition but cape cod have a different adornment style than bungalows
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Old 03-07-2017, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Not the classic bungalow you see in the midwest and west.
It was a common Sears model. Common enough it was named for Pittsburgh.



Is this more what you were thinking of? Or maybe this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Cape cods are often one and a half story with dormers and fit the wiki definition but cape cod have a different adornment style than bungalows
Cape cod houses are different from bungalows in two important ways. First, a bungalow always has very oversize front roof eaves which allow for a sizable front porch. Second, a bungalow is generally boxy in its massing (like a foursquare house, but with the top chopped off) or deeper than it is wide if on a narrow lot. In contrast, cape cods are always wider than they are deep.

Cape Cods (the 20th century version, not the original folk style) are more or less the New England spin on colonial revival, which was a popular building style from 1930-1950. The massing of a cape cod is identical to a colonial, except they don't have a full second story, and are nearly always clad in wood rather than brick as many other colonial revival styles were.
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Old 03-07-2017, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
@escaton

any patterns that surprised you from my maps? Thought the housing history / regional patterns stuff would be something that you like
I was surprised that locally a relatively high proportion of older homes have been lost in the Pittsburgh MSA compared to the Northeast at large. Pittsburgh has its share of urban renewal causing a drop in housing stock, and loss due to abandonment, but within city limits it seems like around half of the housing units from 1940 are still around today. I do wonder how the census counts a structure which was SFH in 1940, but was later subdivided into apartments. Or the converse actually. But that dynamic could at most be effective within the city itself, not Allegheny County as a whole, and certainly not the outlying counties.

I also find it interesting that in general New England and Upstate New York have been the best at retaining older housing stock - even better than the Mid Atlantic. I say this because, in general, brick houses stand the test of time better than wood clad ones. A wood house requires repainting every seven years or so, and some other routine maintenance, meaning its easy for it to go to crap if an area becomes blighted, or even if the owner becomes elderly and doesn't keep up with what's needed to stop water infiltration. In contrast, a brick house can go 50 years without pointing, meaning provided the roof is reasonably solid it can stay unoccupied for decades and still be rehabbed.
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Old 03-07-2017, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,316 posts, read 119,983,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
It was a common Sears model. Common enough it was named for Pittsburgh.



Is this more what you were thinking of? Or maybe this?



Cape cod houses are different from bungalows in two important ways. First, a bungalow always has very oversize front roof eaves which allow for a sizable front porch. Second, a bungalow is generally boxy in its massing (like a foursquare house, but with the top chopped off) or deeper than it is wide if on a narrow lot. In contrast, cape cods are always wider than they are deep.

Cape Cods (the 20th century version, not the original folk style) are more or less the New England spin on colonial revival, which was a popular building style from 1930-1950. The massing of a cape cod is identical to a colonial, except they don't have a full second story, and are nearly always clad in wood rather than brick as many other colonial revival styles were.
That's way different from any bungalow I've been in, and I've been in a lot as a visiting nurse. They all have bedrooms on the first floor. I never had to ask where the bathroom was to wash my hands, they're all in the same place.
https://www.google.com/search?q=bung...s=q:bungalow&*

However, this definition is probably correct: Bungalow Architecture - What is Bungalow style? - Small house - Cottage
"Bungalow style means different things to different people and is therefore not a particularly precise term. It generally connotes a Craftsman-style house, and is widely used by most people that way.

Blurring the definition are some who describe any small house built from 1900 to about 1950 as a bungalow. They may call them Spanish or English bungalows regardless of whether or not they have any true bungalow characteristics."
(Emphasis mine)
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Old 03-07-2017, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
14,358 posts, read 16,816,370 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
That's way different from any bungalow I've been in, and I've been in a lot as a visiting nurse. They all have bedrooms on the first floor. I never had to ask where the bathroom was to wash my hands, they're all in the same place.
https://www.google.com/search?q=bung...s=q:bungalow&*

However, this definition is probably correct: Bungalow Architecture - What is Bungalow style? - Small house - Cottage
"Bungalow style means different things to different people and is therefore not a particularly precise term. It generally connotes a Craftsman-style house, and is widely used by most people that way.

Blurring the definition are some who describe any small house built from 1900 to about 1950 as a bungalow. They may call them Spanish or English bungalows regardless of whether or not they have any true bungalow characteristics."
(Emphasis mine)
Every bungalow I've ever seen has had a second half story (evident from the windows in the dormer). Maybe in some cases the upstairs is used for storage, or there's an additional bedroom on the first floor, but there is a functional second story. This may be less universal out west though.

In my neighborhood there's a few houses with dormers on top of dormers, leading to a functionally three story bungalow-style house. I find this amusing for some reason.
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Old 03-08-2017, 10:31 PM
 
10,210 posts, read 19,056,596 times
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I imagine the "classic bungalow" is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_bungalow

A Cape Cod is definitely not a bungalow. There's a few dormer-on-top-of-dormer Capes in my area, they definitely look funny. Lots of capes built in my area 50s-60s, along with raised ranches, the ubiquitous colonial, and the infamous New Jersey bi-level

I have no idea what the architect behind this latter style was thinking; the bi-level is a house where you enter on a landing and always have to go up or down.
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