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Old 07-23-2009, 12:58 PM
 
486 posts, read 966,970 times
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Everyone in my family, and most of my friends have chosen to live in generic suburbs around Midwestern cities. I think most suburbs are pretty much the same everywhere around the country, and I can't imagine living in any of them. I want to be either in the center of a large city like NY or Chicago, or out in Montana in a log cabin near some mountains with a couple of horses grazing in the yard. In my opinion, suburbs (and even small towns) are the worst of all the options.

I guess in my mind there are four types of living environments. 1. urban 2. suburban 3. small town rural 4. completely out in the sticks rural. I prefer urban and completely out in the sticks rural.

In a strange way, to me, both of my preferred lifestyles offer a certain amount of privacy and anonymity that aren't available in small towns and suburbs. I grew up in a small town (too gossipy and provincial) and lived in a couple of subdivisions in the 'burbs (a little gossipy, but very boring and un-original).

In a city no one gives a crap about your business and out in the sticks, no one's around to bother you. I'm guessing that many people choose the 'burbs out of necessity because of convenience of jobs and schools if they have children, but I wonder how many people who live in one actually LOVE it? I'm still trying to figure out why someone would prefer a close-minded and gossipy small town (remember that I grew up in one).

Am I strange or what? lol! Does anyone else prefer these same 2 city and country extremes?
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Old 07-23-2009, 01:04 PM
 
3,277 posts, read 4,879,354 times
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You're not strange, as long as normal is defined by my tastes.

I find it odd how people move to the suburbs for the open space and nature, parks, etc. if you are a true lover of nature, build a log cabin, dig a well, plant a garden, learn to hunt, and live off of the grid rather than in the bastardisation of the urban and natural.

I would prefer to live my entire life in the city. If not, in a completely rural area with lots of space.
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Old 07-23-2009, 03:16 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,390 posts, read 26,344,011 times
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No issues here... I also hate suburbs and small towns as well. I like being in big bustling cities like sf, nyc, chicago ... or completely detached out in Yosemite or something. I.E. no civilization within 10-20 miles or so. I am in a rural/small townish thing now and people stop by all the time without warrant, just being nice, but it is a bit annoying. Everybody knows eachother. My girlfriend everytime we go out we see people we know, everybody knows what everybody is doing in their lives. yada yada... Suburbs are just annoying, no city amenities, and not close enough to nature.
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Old 07-23-2009, 05:43 PM
 
9,965 posts, read 15,985,749 times
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I've always felt the same way..I loved my time living in cities(Portland, San Francisco, and Edmonton, Alberta)-preferably in a central area, densely populated where I can walk to things..

I lived for four years in Ashland, Oregon, which is a nice small town, but it just felt too tiny after a couple of years--got tired of the feeling that everyone had a right to know everyone's personal business. But I just went for a 30-mile backpacking trip through the Grand Canyon of the Tuolomne in Yosemite, and it felt great to get away to a spot where except for a few other backpackers and my family, my only company was the bears, rainbow trout, squirrels, and rattlesnakes.

I'm the same way with most of my vacations too..I'll take a trip to Tokyo or Montreal or a high mountaintop or deserted tropical beach or wherever..Small towns are nice place to stop on the way to somewhere else, but I've never had much interest in living in one again--and I've never been able to relate to living in the suburbs either, just too bland for my tastes. Although I have a lot of friends from college who feel much differently and now reside in the outlying sprawl of Portland. My dream has always been to own a nice condo or small house right in the center of an urban area and a cabin out in the mountains where I could escape to on weekends for fishing and hiking.
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Old 07-25-2009, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,731 posts, read 21,017,340 times
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People move to the suburbs to get closer to nature which apparently involves driving a tremendously huge car to Wal*Mart and complaining about crime.


ABQConvict
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Old 07-25-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Little Rock / Fayetteville
29 posts, read 55,158 times
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That is not strange at all. Well, if it is,then I am strange too.
I think that most of it comes down to independence, as you said. The other thing that comes to mind is that a move to the suburbs feels permanent. More of a family thing.

While they might disagree on fiscal matters, I think that there is a great similarity on social rights between the two extremes.
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Old 07-25-2009, 07:32 PM
 
5,897 posts, read 11,820,166 times
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While I totally understand where people are coming from, and I agree with them on cookie-cutter sprawl, but many suburban areas are not like this.

Many suburban areas of many major cities often have significant amounts of protected land nearby to recreate and enjoy nature. I know here in the Forest preserves of the Chicago suburbs I can take someone to places they would swear was way out in the boondocks. There are 68,000 acres protected in Cook County alone, and there are 5 million people in the county!

Marin County north of San Francisco is largely protected parkland, and I know areas outside LA. there are mountains that are protected under National Forests (San Gabriels, Santa Monica Mtns.)

Near New York City the Appalachian Trail runs through the exurbs of New York state and New Jersey.

The REAL issue is that many people don't know and parents don't take or encourage their kids to enjoy the places.
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Old 07-26-2009, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Orange, California
1,576 posts, read 5,967,661 times
Reputation: 745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
My dream has always been to own a nice condo or small house right in the center of an urban area and a cabin out in the mountains where I could escape to on weekends for fishing and hiking.
Here, here. I just wish I had the money to afford my dream.
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Old 07-26-2009, 08:03 AM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
13,856 posts, read 24,609,172 times
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I can see what you're saying. Still there are people who really seem to enjoy that sense of community or even the reduction of privacy.

I think an advantage is health and security. If you get sick or injured there's a possible support system. In the sticks you might be pretty far from a hospital. (I know a man up in the mountains who had to drive a good ways while having a heart-attack. Well okay he didn't have to, he should have let his wife do the driving but "didn't want to worry her" or something, but someone would've had to) In a city your neighbors might not care or do anything. Although I think there are city neighborhoods or apartment buildings that are a bit more close-knit, there's the "image" that in a city you're anonymous.

I like the idea of living in "the sticks" and at times even liked the image of living in "the city", but I think both have too big a risk for someone with my congenital condition. I don't like this small town I live, but I do like that when my wheelchair got stuck in the snow someone driving by helped me out. I do like that I can cross the street without worrying I'll be killed by a passing car. And I imagine for people who are elderly it's not entirely dissimilar.
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Old 07-26-2009, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Holland, MI
209 posts, read 624,202 times
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No your not strange at all. Pretty much everything you said are my exact thoughts.

I don't want to live in cookie cutter sub divisions with 100 homes that look almost the same.
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