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Old 09-21-2009, 03:29 PM
 
11,288 posts, read 23,452,121 times
Reputation: 11200

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bhj867 View Post
Chicago is an exception. It's an oasis in a desert of decay.
That sounds like something horribly bleak you hear from the media or coastal people who haven't traveled the area much.

Even with all the doom and gloom talk about the really bad areas, a VAST majority of the Midwest is doing no worse than the other areas.

Think Minneapolis, Des Moines, Madison, Omaha, Kansas City, Milwaukee, Columbus, Grand Rapids, Cinncinati, Indianapolis, Chicago, Champaign, Iowa City, Cedar Rapids, Lincoln, Bloomington, etc.

These places aren't a DYING desert of decay by any means.

I just did a quick search, and from 2000 to 2008 the metro areas of the Midwest without Chicago grew by around 2,000,000 people in the past 8 years, 2,500,000 with Chicago included. That coming off a 4,750,000 million growth from 1990 to 2000 for the region. Even the smaller towns of 10,000 to 50,000 people that have a much harder time staying competitive grew by over 80,000 people.
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Old 09-21-2009, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Zanzibar
14 posts, read 18,684 times
Reputation: 15
so many ghost town have been left in nevada and california...yet they can arise again but by now the budget for west US is still shrinking,once we settle it we'll do some construction
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Old 09-21-2009, 05:42 PM
 
8,256 posts, read 15,160,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Actually it peaked at 100,000, not 280,000.
Yeah, I guess I read it wrong. Haha. Maybe it meant the Utica-Rome or Utica-Rome-Herkimer area.
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Old 09-22-2009, 03:03 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,402 posts, read 23,446,105 times
Reputation: 9970
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHIP72 View Post
Centralia became a dead town because an underground coal mine fire started just outside of town in 1961 or 1962 and could not be put out (and in fact burns to this day). The people in the town received government assistance to relocate; most of those people moved to nearby towns like Mount Carmel (which is also a dying town, but in a more conventional manner common in the anthracite coal region).
One of my history professors at college grew up near there and told us about the underground coal fire, and how dirty the air was there...what a crazy way for a town to die!
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Old 09-22-2009, 05:18 PM
 
Location: USA
5,099 posts, read 4,574,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
One of my history professors at college grew up near there and told us about the underground coal fire, and how dirty the air was there...what a crazy way for a town to die!
There are actually a small multitude of towns that have been doomed by similar circumstances... just look up Superfund sites.
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Old 09-23-2009, 03:04 PM
 
226 posts, read 589,490 times
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Apparantly Galena Illinois, way up north in the driftless zone once had 14000 people due to the old Lead industry, now it has dwindled to a mere 3000 people. Thankfully Galena has kept and restored most of it's mid 19th century homes and storefronts, and is a major tourist spot and has many summer homes for rich Chicagoans. It would have been nice if St. Louis could have done that for Cairo, both the towns are very similar in appearance.
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Old 09-23-2009, 03:05 PM
 
Location: West LA
2,318 posts, read 7,215,864 times
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Dayton hasn't died, but certainly seems to be terminally ill.
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Old 09-23-2009, 03:34 PM
 
11,288 posts, read 23,452,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bhj867 View Post
Apparantly Galena Illinois, way up north in the driftless zone once had 14000 people due to the old Lead industry, now it has dwindled to a mere 3000 people. Thankfully Galena has kept and restored most of it's mid 19th century homes and storefronts, and is a major tourist spot and has many summer homes for rich Chicagoans. It would have been nice if St. Louis could have done that for Cairo, both the towns are very similar in appearance.
That's a good example of a city that drastically shrunk, but is far from being dead. I went there for the first time awhile back - I was amazed at the awesome little downtown and all the old brick architecture.

The city looks in better shape than almost any small towns within 100 miles.
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Old 09-23-2009, 05:29 PM
 
Location: NC
1,672 posts, read 1,597,041 times
Reputation: 523
Butte, MT.

Did you know that at one time this was one of the largest cities east of the Mississippi? Of course that was a century+ ago... So yes it died.
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Old 09-23-2009, 11:56 PM
 
226 posts, read 589,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
That's a good example of a city that drastically shrunk, but is far from being dead. I went there for the first time awhile back - I was amazed at the awesome little downtown and all the old brick architecture.

The city looks in better shape than almost any small towns within 100 miles.
Yea I could definetly see it becoming the next Hamptons of Chicago. BTW what is the Hamptons of Chicago now anyway? Where do the Rich and Famous of Chicago go for retreat?
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