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Old 08-05-2010, 11:27 PM
 
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Also even in places that declined sharply, a significant part of that could be explained by average household size shrinking. I am thinking a number of cities declined in part becuase few new residental units were being built combined with shrinking household size.

A factor in play in a number of places is some areas have a high percentage of older residents whose children have moved out causing in some cases significant population loss even in stable neighborhoods.
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Old 08-08-2010, 07:45 PM
 
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OP said Southern IL is going down the drain, but Carbondale, with Southern IL U is doing quite well. Have to agree on E. St Louis. Camden NJ opened a new aquarium, but plans to shutter its libraries.
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Old 08-08-2010, 09:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
for a more typical case than Boston, look at DC. you will find, I think, that the highest growth rates are in the previously gentrified areas of NW (already have small family sizes, poor folks long gone, dominant drivers are new construction and rising rents leading to MORE persons per unit, as more people take roommates, etc) THEN the newly gentrified areas (where greater sq ft per person is offset by new construction) and that the declines are mostly in areas untouched by gentrification.
I could be wrong, but I don't think "poor folks" ever lived in NW DC. I believe it has always been middle-upper class.
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Old 08-09-2010, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
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I remember reading an article in the Atlanta paper when I was a kid about the town of Oglethorpe, GA being one of the largest cities in the state in the mid 19th century and of its rapid decline. Today, it still exists as the county seat of Macon County, but am having trouble finding anything on the web that goes into more detail. As James Oglethorpe was Georgia's founder, most searches led to other places, i.e. Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, Oglethorpe County in NE Ga, Fort Oglethorpe (a much larger town) in NW GA, etc. I found this tidbit on its history from Wikepedia:

Quote:
Oglethorpe is a city in Macon County, Georgia, United States. The population was 1,200 at the 2000 census. The city is the county seat of Macon County.[3] It was named for Georgia's founder, James Oglethorpe. Oglethorpe was once one of the largest cities in Georgia, and by the 1850s, was tagged as "The Metropolis of Southwest Georgia". By the late 1850s, the city had a population of around 20,000. A Malaria and Smallpox epidemic wiped out most of the city's population in the early 1860s and the remaining residents in Oglethorpe fled south to Americus.
If any Georgia history buffs out there have more info, I would love to see it.
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Old 08-09-2010, 09:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Saintmarks View Post
I remember reading an article in the Atlanta paper when I was a kid about the town of Oglethorpe, GA being one of the largest cities in the state in the mid 19th century and of its rapid decline. Today, it still exists as the county seat of Macon County, but am having trouble finding anything on the web that goes into more detail. As James Oglethorpe was Georgia's founder, most searches led to other places, i.e. Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, Oglethorpe County in NE Ga, Fort Oglethorpe (a much larger town) in NW GA, etc. I found this tidbit on its history from Wikepedia:



If any Georgia history buffs out there have more info, I would love to see it.
Interesting! Sounds kind of like Galena, IL, which at some period during the 19th century, was larger than Chicago.
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Old 08-10-2010, 07:19 PM
 
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Nauvoo, Illinois was almost as big as Chicago, but the inhabitants were run out of the state.
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Old 08-10-2010, 07:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
but plans to shutter its libraries.
Municipal libraries may well have become obsolete. No one seems to care about learning anymore. Few care about reading. Books aren't as hard to get nowadays, and e-books may be the final nail in the coffin. It's sad, but municipal libraries and newpapers may die in our lifetimes.
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Old 08-11-2010, 02:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
OP said Southern IL is going down the drain, but Carbondale, with Southern IL U is doing quite well. Have to agree on E. St Louis. Camden NJ opened a new aquarium, but plans to shutter its libraries.
Another area doing well in Southern Illinois is some of the St. Louis suburbs, mainly O'Fallon and Edwardsville due to being next to either a military base or university.
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Old 08-12-2010, 10:44 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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"I could be wrong, but I don't think "poor folks" ever lived in NW DC. I believe it has always been middle-upper class"

poor folks live in NW DC right now. NW extends all the way to N capital street. The traditionally elite area west of Rock Creek Park is properly upper Northwest.

And while I dont suppose there were ever many truely poor folks in upper NW, there were, IIUC, some more or less lower middle class folks in the apt complexes like Mclean Gardens, and in the older less desirable areas like Glover Park. Also an area like Cleveland Park had lower prices in the late 1960s due to its proximity to "east of Rock Creek Park" If you compare the price increases between 1969 and say, 1999, for Cleveland Park vs say the areas of MacArthur Blvd, I think you will see they were much more dramatic for Cleveland Park. Maybe thats not gentrification, if that is defined as actual displacement of poor people, but there are definitely areas in upper NW that went from "marginal areas good for young college grads in low paying jobs" to "totally unaffordable by anyone not elite"

and of course there are long gentrified areas of NW EAST of Rock Creek Park, like Georgetown itself, and Dupont Circle, which DID have poor people.
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Old 08-12-2010, 10:47 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
Municipal libraries may well have become obsolete. No one seems to care about learning anymore. Few care about reading. Books aren't as hard to get nowadays, and e-books may be the final nail in the coffin. It's sad, but municipal libraries and newpapers may die in our lifetimes.

My local library is often crowded. People taking out books or looking at periodicals. Students studying, tutoring, etc. Folks lined up to use the PC's. Also CD's and DVDs for borrowing.

Lots of folks here read, and its a lot cheaper borrowing than buying them, even at ebook prices (IF those prices hold, and IF you have an e reader). And quite frankly not every wants to take an expensive electronic device (well other than a phone, and even THAT..) on the subway, to the beach, etc.
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