U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-29-2009, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Maryland
4,621 posts, read 6,074,214 times
Reputation: 5155

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by bhj867 View Post
Chicago is an exception. It's an oasis in a desert of decay.
Not all Midwestern cities are decaying...My examples would be some of the smaller cities such as: Madison, Bloomington/Normal, Champaign/Urbana, Ann Arbor, Rockford (albeit it is still a dying city as far as jobs are concerned...), Aurora, Joliet...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-29-2009, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Omaha
2,716 posts, read 6,385,999 times
Reputation: 1227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Not all Midwestern cities are decaying...My examples would be some of the smaller cities such as: Madison, Bloomington/Normal, Champaign/Urbana, Ann Arbor, Rockford (albeit it is still a dying city as far as jobs are concerned...), Aurora, Joliet...
Columbus is doing very well, too.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 02:54 PM
 
226 posts, read 589,526 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Not all Midwestern cities are decaying...My examples would be some of the smaller cities such as: Madison, Bloomington/Normal, Champaign/Urbana, Ann Arbor, Rockford (albeit it is still a dying city as far as jobs are concerned...), Aurora, Joliet...
True, albeit most of those are university towns. Aurora and Joliet are stabilized on the shirt tails of Chicago. When it comes to good old fashioned industry and jobs alot of these cities are still suffering.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 03:05 PM
 
8,256 posts, read 15,161,500 times
Reputation: 6017
Centralia, PA

From Wiki:
"During most of the borough's history, when coal mining activity was being conducted, the town had a population in excess of 2,000 residents. Another 500 to 600 residents lived in unincorporated areas immediately adjacent to Centralia."

"As of the 2000 census,[12] there were 21 people"

Centralia, Pennsylvania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 03:10 PM
 
226 posts, read 589,526 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Centralia, PA

From Wiki:
"During most of the borough's history, when coal mining activity was being conducted, the town had a population in excess of 2,000 residents. Another 500 to 600 residents lived in unincorporated areas immediately adjacent to Centralia."

"As of the 2000 census,[12] there were 21 people"

Centralia, Pennsylvania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
SILENT HILL If they do film a sequel to this, hopefully they find a little town in Maine or Oregon to film in so it will look more like the game.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 03:16 PM
 
8,256 posts, read 15,161,500 times
Reputation: 6017
Forgotten Pennsylvania: Centralia
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 03:46 PM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
13,856 posts, read 23,953,003 times
Reputation: 6720
That's fascinating, I'd never heard of it before.

Looking up bigger towns/cities in decline Wheeling, West Virginia apparently once had a population of 61,659. Its current population is less than half that. Although the Wheeling metro-area is a bit bigger.

Wheeling, West Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
//www.city-data.com/city/Wheeli...-Virginia.html

For cities that actually died

Virginia City, Montana - "With a population of over 10,000 in 1864, Virginia City was the largest town in the inland Northwest." "According to the latest population survey... 132 very hardy souls." It was apparently once the capital of "Montana territory" (Granted 132 is still some population, also this site says it's 144 and growing, but it seems to have survived largely as a historical preservation effort)

http://virginiacity.com/#fun_facts
//www.city-data.com/city/Virgin...y-Montana.html

Holy City, California - Kind-of more a cult compound or something. It was led by a William E. Riker. Rather than bed alien women and stroke his beard, this William Riker preached celibacy and practiced bigamy. He also leaned toward white-supremacy and admiration of Hitler. At one time the town had more than 300 people, but currently has 3. It may have inspired the Karen Joy Fowler story "Always."

http://www.thewavemag.com/pagegen.php?pagename=article&articleid=24768 (broken link)

Thurmond, West Virginia - Once a coal-town with hundreds of people only seven remain.

http://www.coalcampusa.com/sowv/rive...d/thurmond.htm
//www.city-data.com/city/Thurmo...-Virginia.html



Kaskaskia, Illinois - Wikipedia says it was once the territorial capital of Illinois. It currently has just 9 people. Flooding problems killed it.

http://www.prairieghosts.com/kaskaskia.html
//www.city-data.com/city/Kaskaskia-Illinois.html

Last edited by Thomas R.; 07-29-2009 at 05:04 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
5,023 posts, read 8,114,192 times
Reputation: 4793
With the exception of Centralia, Pa, have any of the cities mentioned above "died?" They are losing population, and are economically distressed. But, when I think of a dead city, or a city that has died, I think of a ghost town or a place where no people live.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 04:24 PM
 
226 posts, read 589,526 times
Reputation: 142
Maybe I should have named this thread, Cities that are on hospice. lol I'm not worrying about it. This has turned into a very interesting thread.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-29-2009, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
5,023 posts, read 8,114,192 times
Reputation: 4793
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhj867 View Post
Maybe I should have named this thread, Cities that are on hospice. lol I'm not worrying about it. This has turned into a very interesting thread.
Well, although a few more of the cities might qualify, I still don't think that most of the cities in this thread would fit that description.

(But I'm probably a bit too sensitive to this kind of stuff because the city I'm currently living in was named in the first reply.)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top