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Old 08-03-2009, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach/Norfolk.
1,555 posts, read 3,964,082 times
Reputation: 428

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Old 08-03-2009, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach/Norfolk.
1,555 posts, read 3,964,082 times
Reputation: 428
Norfolkwas the 8th largest city at one point. Now it's the 70th somethin with 240,000 residents.the City was plagued by yellowfever, burned to the ground, nd white flight.
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Old 08-08-2009, 04:28 PM
 
226 posts, read 589,435 times
Reputation: 140
Norfolk was very dense.
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Old 08-09-2009, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,521 posts, read 8,441,588 times
Reputation: 2439
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Centralia, PA

From Wiki:
"During most of the borough's history, when coal mining activity was being conducted, the town had a population in excess of 2,000 residents. Another 500 to 600 residents lived in unincorporated areas immediately adjacent to Centralia."

"As of the 2000 census,[12] there were 21 people"

Centralia, Pennsylvania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Centralia became a dead town because an underground coal mine fire started just outside of town in 1961 or 1962 and could not be put out (and in fact burns to this day). The people in the town received government assistance to relocate; most of those people moved to nearby towns like Mount Carmel (which is also a dying town, but in a more conventional manner common in the anthracite coal region).
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Old 08-09-2009, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,521 posts, read 8,441,588 times
Reputation: 2439
Though they aren't cities, some of the most depressing towns are along old U.S. 66 in the southwest, like Holbrook, AZ and Tucumcari, NM, which were highly dependent on through traffic/hotel revenues/restaurant revenues of people staying in town while driving across the country. The interstates (and specifically Interstate 40 in this case) really damaged those towns.

IMO, the towns I mentioned above are even more depressing than the old coal and steel manufacturing towns common in the Northeast and Midwest (and I've been through many towns of the latter type).
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Old 08-09-2009, 09:39 PM
 
122 posts, read 274,142 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHIP72 View Post
Though they aren't cities, some of the most depressing towns are along old U.S. 66 in the southwest, like Holbrook, AZ and Tucumcari, NM, which were highly dependent on through traffic/hotel revenues/restaurant revenues of people staying in town while driving across the country. The interstates (and specifically Interstate 40 in this case) really damaged those towns.

IMO, the towns I mentioned above are even more depressing than the old coal and steel manufacturing towns common in the Northeast and Midwest (and I've been through many towns of the latter type).
Yes i agree the small towns in arizona. At lest the ones ive been to are very bleak mostly because they are in the middle of no where especially the ones on the Navajo reservation.

The cities it the coal mining areas i could see making a comback.
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Old 08-10-2009, 10:44 AM
 
1,012 posts, read 2,328,908 times
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Kokomo, Indiana. The city's stubborn reliance on the struggling auto industry has hit this city hard, with thousands and thousands of job losses over the years. Its one hour drive north from Indianapolis unfortunately doesnt even help.
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Old 08-10-2009, 10:50 AM
 
1,012 posts, read 2,328,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That-Guy View Post
Columbus is doing very well, too.
One important Midwest city that is doing good is Indianapolis.
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Old 08-10-2009, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Southern California
3,455 posts, read 7,597,450 times
Reputation: 1412
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhj867 View Post
Chicago is an exception. It's an oasis in a desert of decay.
*crike* that is some serious language to describe the midwest. It is really quite nice there and rather vibrant...not just in Chicago. There are plenty of towns in the midwest that are anchored by industry, business, educational institutions, agriculture, government, etc. It is still a great place to be. Though, some cities have indeed gone downhill or passed on (like the dearly departed) there ARE vibrant towns and cities outside of Chicago.
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Old 08-10-2009, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Earth at the moment
321 posts, read 1,038,510 times
Reputation: 128
I'm not really sure what you mean with cities that died, a city that has died can mean different things. But I would guess 90% of the cities that exists has died?
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