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Old 01-16-2014, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
564 posts, read 1,040,536 times
Reputation: 996

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Not dating someone because they eat meat? How is that any different than saying you refuse to date someone who is Black, or Jewish, or Asian? Many couples can co-exist with different dietary standards, especially if one has health issues or other concerns.

This attitude seems extremely elitist and discriminatory. What's next, not even being friends with meat eaters or not hiring them for jobs or not letting them date your children? Living in a human society means dealing with people and cultures that are different from your own. Do your own thing and approach others with an open mind and tolerance.

Enjoy your preferences, and continue to promote your ideals and values. Some people will "stick", others will go on their way. But life is far more richer when we allow different ideals and values to intersect with our own.
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Old 01-16-2014, 03:18 PM
 
19,969 posts, read 30,227,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Molli View Post
Yes, I would date and marry a meat eater. I wouldn't buy it or cook it for him, though. There are so many issues in this world that concern me, this difference between the two of us wouldn't stop me from getting to know him.
this sounds reasonable...kudos to you!

i once dated an angry vegan, i tolerated her and her smoking (which i found ironic) for a short time...
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Old 01-17-2014, 11:58 AM
 
2,319 posts, read 3,051,605 times
Reputation: 2678
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthYorkEd View Post
Not dating someone because they eat meat? How is that any different than saying you refuse to date someone who is Black, or Jewish, or Asian? Many couples can co-exist with different dietary standards, especially if one has health issues or other concerns.

This attitude seems extremely elitist and discriminatory. What's next, not even being friends with meat eaters or not hiring them for jobs or not letting them date your children? Living in a human society means dealing with people and cultures that are different from your own. Do your own thing and approach others with an open mind and tolerance.

Enjoy your preferences, and continue to promote your ideals and values. Some people will "stick", others will go on their way. But life is far more richer when we allow different ideals and values to intersect with our own.
It is an important ethical consideration for some people, and I think that we all have the right to prioritize the significance of our personal ethics. I wouldn't, for example, date a murderer, rapist, child molestor, etc. Those considerations rank extremely high to me. Some people rank the harm to animals that result in the meat on their table as very high as well. I disagree with you that something we were born with, such as the color of our skin or the culture we belong to. is the same thing as an ethical decision made to have no close associations with those who consume meat. We can tolerate people, but doesn't mean we want to live with them. I choose to date men who consume meat, so long as they don't belittle my decision not to consume meat.
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Old 01-17-2014, 12:00 PM
 
2,319 posts, read 3,051,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
this sounds reasonable...kudos to you!

i once dated an angry vegan, i tolerated her and her smoking (which i found ironic) for a short time...

I might be angry if I was a vegan LOL. A real vegan will give up all products that derive from animals, including leather. I don't see myself giving up leather shoes and my leather tack for my horses any time soon! Heck if I was a vegan I wonder if I could even own a horse!

Smoking is an absolute deal breaker to me.
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Old 01-17-2014, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
20,936 posts, read 28,426,121 times
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I am not vegan but on occasion I do eat vegetarian. In fact I love an all veggie meals as long as there is a pasta, rice or potato with it. I couldn't go vegan., I love egg, cheese and milk. It would not bother me to date or marry a vegan/vegetarian but they would have to respect that I do eat meat and fish. My hairdresser is a vegetarian but her husband is not, she has no problem making meat dishes for him or others. It should not matter what a person eats. My husband could do a vegetarian meal maybe once a week which I do but he loves chicken and fish. We only eat red meat once a month, we mostly eat chicken. Fish once a month (it's expensive where I am).I feel it's important how the person treats you and how you get along rather than what foods you eat.
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Old 01-18-2014, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Lompoc, CA
29 posts, read 65,087 times
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I'm a vegan who's been dating an omnivore for a little over two and a half years and live with her as well.

No issues. I make food and she eats it. She buys and eats animal products and I don't care. We go out to restaurants all the time and have no problems. I've bought her food, including animal products, many times.

Being vegan is a personal choice I made and in no way do I want to impose that on her. Animal products don't gross me out and I don't freak out if I accidentally eat some.

My choice of diet and my love life have pretty much nothing to do with each other.
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Old 01-18-2014, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Rougemont
20 posts, read 35,772 times
Reputation: 54
My wife was vegetarian when she met me. I was a meat eater. Meat and potatoes kind of guy you know?

She is a wonderful woman to have dealt with me, we debated vegetarianism many times throughout our relationship, but she still would cook me a steak if I wanted it. Best steak and pork chops ever by the way.

Either way, over our years together, she taught me to love my veggies, and before long, I realized that my diet was primarily becoming vegetarian. Soon enough, one day I came to my own epiphany which she let me reach on my own. No prodding, it was all my decision.

I was doing research one day on puppy mills. Being a dog lover, I said "I'm going to sign petitions to end puppy mills!" Now one of my more popular anti vegetarian arguments was this, "Abstain from meat all you want, it won't save their lives."

When I exclaimed that I was going to sign these petitions my wife used her quick wit to turn my logic back on me, "But honey, if you sign every petition in the world, it won't stop puppy mills, they'll keep being abused and neglected." Suddenly it hit me, my bias/favoritism for dogs was blinding me from the bigger picture.

The pig on the dinner table is no less a living being than the dog that licks my face in the morning. And even if I won't stop puppy mills or save cows from factory farming, I at least won't support the act. I am no longer biased and selfishly illogical to myself.

So the moral to my story is this, date/marry the one who is right for you. You MIGHT help them see your point of view. But even if you don't, that doesn't mean it's doomed. Relationships are like snowflakes, no two relationships are the same.
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Old 01-24-2014, 02:09 PM
 
Location: somewhere flat
1,373 posts, read 1,655,077 times
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Just as I could not date a smoker (partially because of the taste) I could not date a non vegetarian.

It's the smell,in part. Also, for me it's an ethical issue. I have friends who eat meat, but I don't kiss them.

Just as some people would not date outside of their faith, I could not become emotionally and romantically involved with someone who eats meat.
Wearing fur would be another "deal breaker" for me.
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Old 01-29-2014, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Maryland's 6th District.
8,357 posts, read 25,242,922 times
Reputation: 6541
Quote:
Originally Posted by missik999 View Post
Just curious, because I am single and not particularly interested in dating men who eat meat. I don't even like to walk by the meat counter at the grocery store, it all looks like dead animals to me.
I have been out of the scene for awhile, but I was vegan for 8 years. Back then, yes, I would have. Ironically, these days I would not date a vegan. A vegetarian, yes, but vegans really are an annoying bunch as a whole. I should know, I was one.

I was vegan during a time when the majority of vegans seemed to be doing it mostly for the animals and got out of it around the time when veganism was becoming a health craze. I can dig someone doing it for political reasons, but those who are in it simply for health remind of the old George Carlin joke:

Eat right, stay fit, and die anyway.

Meat never bothered me. People cooking meat or eating meat didn't, either. I did have issue with amount of meat the average person ate in a day, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
So, do you think most vegetarians are vegetarians because they feel sorry for the animals, or do some have other reasons?
If I thought that my not eating meat whould make any difference whatsoever in the meat industry, then I would be one too.
My whole trip was against factory farming. I never thought eating meat was wrong, or gross, or what ever, and I never really got the whole speciesism thing. I also never thought hunting was wrong, but was against using bait, scents, or other tricks to lure and fool the prey.

Quote:
Originally Posted by missik999 View Post
One person not eating meat will not shut down the cruel meat industry. However, many people not eating meat will make a difference. And vegetarianism/veganism is growing. I have been vegetarian for many years, and I am amazed how many more vegetarian options are available at restaurants and grocery stores.

And I refuse to contribute to the cruel treatment and slaughter of animals. By purchasing meat I would bear some of the responsibility.

I actually overheard a woman at a restaurant talking about how she hated factory farming, and the way animals are treated before slaughter. Her companion asked why she was eating steak if that bothered her, and her answer was that she wasn't the one who killed the cow, it wasn't her fault.

I recently adopted a dog from a local shelter that is very overcrowded. Jasper is a beautiful dog with a gentle temperment, and he is one of three rescued pets that I currently have. People have asked me what good it is to adopt Jasper, when there are a hundred more there that will be euthanized. Like adopting one dog won't make a difference. But for this one dog, it made all the difference in the world.
Most vegans, the hardcore ones anyways, think that vegetarians are full of you-know-what and to scared, or weak, to go all the way. The two are not quite the allies you might think. The amount of vegetarians/vegans is still relatively low compared to the larger population. Vegetarians and vegans are growing in Western culture, but will never grow fast-enough to "over take" the scene. Besides, when they do, the vegans will wage war against vegetarians for eating dairy and eggs. Then what? The raw foodies going after the vegans? Total silliness.

Yes, there are many more food options offered in restaurants and grocery stores. This is because of the realized niche market. Processed food is still plastic food no matter how vegan it is. Besides, many of the vegan, organic, "natural", what-ever, food items sold in grocery stores are ultimately owned by a multi-national corporation. Not all, but a good number. Something to think about next time you make snide comments about another's eating habits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drowningintherain2 View Post
That is such flawed thinking. The animal was killed for her and those other flesh eaters like her. It's like hiring a hitman to kill someone and then claiming that you didn't actually kill the person..epic logic fail a great example of some of the mental olympics many go to to justify (to themselves)their consumption of flesh.
Talk about flawed thinking. Your analogy is completely off base considering the diner in question did not pay to have the cow slaughtered. That cow would have been slaughtered even if that diner did not exist.

Out of sight, out of mind.
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Old 01-30-2014, 01:56 AM
 
7,975 posts, read 7,351,944 times
Reputation: 12046
My daughter is a vegetarian (not a vegan). Her husband eats meat, although she does not cook it for him. When they send out for pizza, she doesn't lecture him or give him dirty looks when he orders his with pepperoni and sausage, or when he orders chicken or steak when they eat out. She's pretty much live and let live. The meals she prepares for them at home are vegetarian, and he doesn't object.

On family holidays celebrated at her house (like Christmas) her DH will buy a turkey and I'll prepare it. She doesn't object to that, but she doesn't like it carved at the dining table (I do it in the kitchen). He brought home a bag of chicken legs and asked me to make them for him in their crockpot, which I did, and my daughter didn't object to that either.

Her mother-in-law lives close by, and has been known to "drop by" occasionally with leftover pot roast, roast beef, etc. for her son. My daughter's a good sport about that, too.

She once pointed out the irony that her grandparents (on my DH's side) are vegetarian/vegan, it then skipped a generation, and now she is a vegetarian. My DH (her father) was raised a vegetarian and remained one until his early 20's, then began to eat meat. Ditto all but one of his siblings. Now many of the next generation (their children/grandchildren) are becoming vegetarian/vegan.
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