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Old 09-19-2017, 11:38 PM
 
Location: NYC
5,301 posts, read 3,673,667 times
Reputation: 16182

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I experimented with this last year & the coconut milk was the best tasting addition to my coffee but the saturated fat level there scared me back to skim milk, plus I had a vitamin D deficiency & that's added to milk. Black coffee has never done it for me.
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Old 09-22-2017, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,813 posts, read 32,764,384 times
Reputation: 38583
I remember trying almond milk years ago and really disliked it. But, I just switched from 2% cow's milk to almond milk and found the transition really easy. So, I'm not sure if they figured out how to make it more tasty or what, but I actually like it now.

I'm nervous about pesticides now that I'm learning all about this stuff. Soy is one of the crops that has been genetically modified so it can handle the pesticides, so traces of the pesticides show up in a lot of soy products. So, I'm shy about them, unless they are organic - but then they're more expensive than almond milk, so I'm sticking to almond milk.
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Old 09-25-2017, 11:36 AM
 
1,569 posts, read 1,079,453 times
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We use Blue Diamond Almond Breeze, original reduced sugar in our cereal and Silk soy creamer for coffee.
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:54 PM
 
Location: In the middle between the sun and moon
534 posts, read 495,150 times
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I have access to raw dairy right now, which I am taking advantage of, but when I don't, I make almond milk. Commercial almond milks have so few almonds and is mostly fillers to texturize it. It's so easy to make almond milk at home that I evangelize the process just so nobody will have to drink the commercial stuff!

Soak a cup of almonds almonds overnight. The next day, drain, rinse, and blend with whatever ratio of water you like. I like mine thicker than most, but the standard is 1:4 or 1:3. Strain. I use the reusable produce bags, but it would probably be really easy to make your own, or buy a nut milk bag. I add a pinch of salt and a little raw honey to mine. Just enough to give it more depth and complexity, the way real milk has nuanced flavors.

I find the almond milk lasts longer with salt and honey, too. I keep it in an airtight pitcher and it lasts a week.

Cashews are really good too, and the soaking part takes only a few hours.

I'm picky, so I like to slip the skins off the almonds before I blend them, it adds an extra 5 minutes but it's meditative for me and I like it! I don't think this is necessary.

I would like to try adding real vanilla bean sometime!

Homemade almond milk is just light years away from commercial. There are probably many tutorials online much better than mine, I just want to convince everyone how easy it is, and the taste is so very worth the effort.
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Old 10-04-2017, 04:09 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,198 posts, read 676,683 times
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I have also made my own almond milk, as well as homemade flaxseed milk, coconut milk, and rice milk. I drank homemade flaxseed milk for a long time. But with working almost 50 hours per week, ballet classes, fitness center every morning before work, keeping up with the house and everything else, I got lazy and started buying plant milks again. One carton will last me about two weeks.

I had forgotten to mention that pea milk is another newer plant milk on the market. It is comparable to soy milk as far as more protein, and is a little thicker and richer than a lot of plant milks. Ripple is a brand that sells pea milk. It doesn't sound that good, but is actually quite tasty! They also add vegan DHA to it, and I think B12? I used it once to make mashed potatoes and have used it in baking and it works very well due to the higher protein content and richness of it. It is higher in calories though than other plant milks. They have an unsweetened version that is 80 calories per cup. It is one of the more expensive plant milks though, and can be hard to find.

I dislike all the added ingredients that tend to be in plant based milks and yogurts as well, such as carrageenan, guar gum, lecithin etc. I believe there are a few organic plant milks on the market that have only a tiny few ingredients, but tend to lack calcium in them (for those who rely on "milk" to meet calcium needs). My body doesn't tolerate dairy milk though, but I can tolerate plain unflavored dairy yogurts and very occasionally the softer cheeses like ricotta or cottage cheese (without rennet of course). I rarely consume them, but more often consume organic plain 0% yogurt/Greek yogurt with fewer than three ingredients in it. I probably use plant milks more for cooking and baking than for drinking.
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Old 10-04-2017, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
28,226 posts, read 37,082,996 times
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I just noticed a new brand of nut milk at Target: Malk.

They have almond, cashew and I think pecan milks. I have tried the almond and cashew and they are very good. Ingredients are along the lines of nuts, water, dates ....
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Old 10-04-2017, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,813 posts, read 32,764,384 times
Reputation: 38583
Quote:
Originally Posted by typical_guinea_pig View Post
I have access to raw dairy right now, which I am taking advantage of, but when I don't, I make almond milk. Commercial almond milks have so few almonds and is mostly fillers to texturize it. It's so easy to make almond milk at home that I evangelize the process just so nobody will have to drink the commercial stuff!

Soak a cup of almonds almonds overnight. The next day, drain, rinse, and blend with whatever ratio of water you like. I like mine thicker than most, but the standard is 1:4 or 1:3. Strain. I use the reusable produce bags, but it would probably be really easy to make your own, or buy a nut milk bag. I add a pinch of salt and a little raw honey to mine. Just enough to give it more depth and complexity, the way real milk has nuanced flavors.

I find the almond milk lasts longer with salt and honey, too. I keep it in an airtight pitcher and it lasts a week.

Cashews are really good too, and the soaking part takes only a few hours.

I'm picky, so I like to slip the skins off the almonds before I blend them, it adds an extra 5 minutes but it's meditative for me and I like it! I don't think this is necessary.

I would like to try adding real vanilla bean sometime!

Homemade almond milk is just light years away from commercial. There are probably many tutorials online much better than mine, I just want to convince everyone how easy it is, and the taste is so very worth the effort.
I'd love to try this. I don't understand how you strain with a produce bag, though. And do you need hand strength? My hands are giving me trouble with gripping.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:18 PM
 
Location: In the middle between the sun and moon
534 posts, read 495,150 times
Reputation: 2081
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I'd love to try this. I don't understand how you strain with a produce bag, though. And do you need hand strength? My hands are giving me trouble with gripping.
I use the reusable produce bags. By reusable I mean fine mesh bags my co op sells which take the place of the plastic bags. It's some kind of sheer synthetic fabric, but it works great for straining. I think most people use nut milk bags, but I've never used one (or actually seen one that I know of). I would guess they are similar. I am almost certain that one could go to a fabric store and buy the fabric used in the reusable produce bags for much cheaper and make straining bags. I would but I don't have a sewing machine or the sewing skills, alas.

I would not say you need a very firm grip, but I'm not sure what your limits are right now, so I don't know! A lot of the milk drains out into the bowl just by it's own weight/gravity. To get as much milk out as possible, you do have to squeeze the bag, but it's not a hard squeeze (or doesn't have to be). Also, if your grip is very limited, you could divide the total into two or three separate strainings. Because with much less nut residue in each straining, it would be very easy, you could just kind of press it with your hands.

I hope it turns out great for you!
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Old 10-05-2017, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,198 posts, read 676,683 times
Reputation: 3005
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I'd love to try this. I don't understand how you strain with a produce bag, though. And do you need hand strength? My hands are giving me trouble with gripping.
If you can find a natural food store or Whole Foods Coop near you, chances are they sell nut milk bags. I have just one nut milk bag and have used it over 100 times at least. They are very easy to clean also. I paid maybe $5 for mine? Can't remember. I've also used it to make homemade vegan nut based cheese. The pulp that is filtered from almond milk can be saved and used for baking or other purposes. I use it in making granola.
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Old 10-05-2017, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,813 posts, read 32,764,384 times
Reputation: 38583
Quote:
Originally Posted by typical_guinea_pig View Post
I use the reusable produce bags. By reusable I mean fine mesh bags my co op sells which take the place of the plastic bags. It's some kind of sheer synthetic fabric, but it works great for straining. I think most people use nut milk bags, but I've never used one (or actually seen one that I know of). I would guess they are similar. I am almost certain that one could go to a fabric store and buy the fabric used in the reusable produce bags for much cheaper and make straining bags. I would but I don't have a sewing machine or the sewing skills, alas.

I would not say you need a very firm grip, but I'm not sure what your limits are right now, so I don't know! A lot of the milk drains out into the bowl just by it's own weight/gravity. To get as much milk out as possible, you do have to squeeze the bag, but it's not a hard squeeze (or doesn't have to be). Also, if your grip is very limited, you could divide the total into two or three separate strainings. Because with much less nut residue in each straining, it would be very easy, you could just kind of press it with your hands.

I hope it turns out great for you!
OH, I see. Very cool reusable bags! I haven't seen that type before. And I understand now that I wouldn't have to squeeze super hard. I can grip things, but my hands get sore now, and I wear Gorilla Gloves when I have to open and close jars now. They're really great, by the way for doing anything where you have to grab hold of something. I hate rubber gloves, and the Gorilla Gloves are made of stretchy fabric and easy on and off, but have a rubber palm. Got mine at Home Depot. I wear them when I have to move boards around (I was making signs for crafts). This morning I went to take the bands off the jars of soup I canned yesterday, and needed to put on the Gorilla Gloves to get them off. Anyway, that's my gripping issue.

I do have a sewing machine and the skills, but it's not set up yet in my new apartment, and I'm feeling too lazy to do so yet LOL. Waiting for cold weather to fix up my craft room. It's still hot here in San Jose, CA. Thank you for this post :-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robinwomb View Post
If you can find a natural food store or Whole Foods Coop near you, chances are they sell nut milk bags. I have just one nut milk bag and have used it over 100 times at least. They are very easy to clean also. I paid maybe $5 for mine? Can't remember. I've also used it to make homemade vegan nut based cheese. The pulp that is filtered from almond milk can be saved and used for baking or other purposes. I use it in making granola.
Brilliant! Yes, there are Whole Foods Stores around me now. I never go there because they're so expensive. But, if I can reuse the bag, that's great. I also really like the idea of using the pulp in something else. Brilliant! Thank you.
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