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Old 08-22-2006, 02:02 PM
 
7 posts, read 26,920 times
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Hi!
Looking for some truth about the weather in New England.

I have always wanted to live in the New England area. Even though I have never been there, it seems like a very beautiful area and something tells me that it is also very civilized….among other great qualities. My problem is that I have no idea what it is like to live in that type of weather. I am from the South (MS) where it is hot and humid but I have never liked that type of weather. I am happier when it is cold. Most people tell me that I would hate it in New England because you have to "deal" with so much snow and you're always freezing your a** off! How is it really? Can you put it into perspective for someone that has never dealt with snow/low temps? Anyone originally from the South, if so, what do you think of the weather there?
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Old 08-22-2006, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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Up here in Vermont we deal with winter by getting out and enjoying it whether it be skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling etc. It gets cold, sure, but if you dress right you have no problem. LL Bean is the outfitter of choice for many.
Generally in Jan/Feb highs are in the teens to twenties. Nights can dip below zero. We usually have a week or two of weather where daytime temps struggle to hit 10. It's the wind chill that makes it feel colder than it is.
Again, snow is dealt with up here. Schools stay open (for the most part -if we get a huge dumping or ice they'll close) and you go to work. Our road crews do a great job keeping the roads as clear as possible.
Summer temps are generally in the 70s & 80s. We'll occasionally get the hot/hazy/humid temps...usually a week or two a summer.
I spent a summer in North Carolina and could not stand the humidity. Was glad to get back home!
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Old 08-22-2006, 04:46 PM
 
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Oh! I love it! I love the cold and I love lots and lots of snow. :
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Old 08-22-2006, 05:26 PM
 
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Marooned;
Weather in New England varies greatly. Burlington in northern Vermont, not far from the Canadian border has a classic continential New England climate, with 4 distinct seasons. Winters begin in mid November and last sometimes into mid April, with lots of snow and brutal cold. (although in recent years because of climate change, the winters have become much less severe).

Southern Vermont around Brattleboro has slightly less severe cold and snow.

Milder parts of New England are in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and southern coastal Maine. These regions again have less snow and the cold is less intense. Boston and Providence on the sea are milder then inland locations.

In general, throughout all of New England, seasons are very distinct, in southern New England, summers are longer and warmer, with less long lasting cold and snow in the winter, compared to Vermont and the rest of northern New England.

Coastal Connecticut, most of Rhode Island, Boston south to Plymouth and Cape Cod, and Cape Anne Mass have New Englands mildest climate. These regions are tempered by the nearby Atlantic ocean. Snow in Vermont and New Hampshire and Maine in these regions turns to rain in southern New England. Autumns extend into mid December with mild weather. Summers are warmer inland in these parts of southern New England, with hot and humid weather in the 90s that can last many days. Here central Air is now a must- again because of climate change- the weather is becoming warmer.

The most pleasant time of the year in central Connecticut (40 miles from the Ocean and sound) is mid April to late June and from late August to late November. Summers can be very hot in inland southern New England. While in the winter there can be cold spells with rain sleet and snow- and gloomy periods that may last for days. There are frequent thaws and mild periods. Last winter was mild throughout most of the 6 state region.

If coming from Miss. hot weather here can last for 5-9 days, then a cool front from the north gives us a few days of relief, before the heat returns. We do not have oppressive hot, humid weather all summer. July is the hottest month, January the coldest. By late August the weather here 'changes' with less frequent hot spells.

Even in milder southern New England, you will have to make adjustments to the colder weather in winter. Which will be unpleasant to you at first.
During the coldest part of winter, there will be some periods of snow, sleet, freezing rain (sometimes an occassional blizzard) will make life miserable. And temps for days below freezing with raw wind chill will even hit southern New England, before a thaw comes and it warms into the mild 40's and the snow and ice melts. By early March in southern New England the weather begins to moderate (later in northern New England)

You will certainly enjoy the spring flowers and trees (we do have magnolia's this far north!) And even redwoods- along the shore, some gardeners grow cold hardy palms in a protected location. Summer's here will be pleasant for you- and at times in the southern part of the region remind you of home when the heat sets in, with the humidity.

Autumns are mild to warm, with sunny golden days and crisp cool nights. By late November, rain, clouds and generally nasty chilly weather can arrive. In early November of last year it was in the low 70's in Connecticut.

Of course on Cape Cod and right along the coast, winters will be mildest, and summers less hot. Hope this helps!

Last edited by Dragondog; 08-22-2006 at 06:09 PM..
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Old 08-22-2006, 06:50 PM
 
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Default From NO and love the NE weather

Hi,
I'm originally from New Orleans and never thought of myself as a winter person until life brought me to CT. I love the cooler weather. It still gets pretty warm in the summers. Enough for me to be reminded of why I love the weather here since it does have the four distinct seasons. I find that as long as I dress accordingly, I'm never cold. Alot of times, I don't even wear a coat - too bulky. I usually wear a shirt with a thick sweater and I'm more than warm. Hope this helps!
See you in New England.
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Old 08-22-2006, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Burlington VT
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Marooned - I can't improve on the EXCELLENT posts above, except to say that A) there are significant variations due to altitude etc etc etc in every case and B) You haven't lived until you've seen a New England Autumn - and gone cross country skiing or snowshoeing on a warm sunny Spring day. Spring's pretty wonderful too. Summer you're pretty well aquainted with I suspect ;-)

I mention A simply to make it clear how much temps etc vary even within a single county in, say, VT. In Burlington the Lake moderates the temperatures enormously. On days in the Autumn when folks at high elevations are getting frost on thier pumpkins and covering the tomatoes at night - I'm sleeping with the windows open and often have a fan on. It's because I'm very near sea level and walking distance from the lake.

Fire up your browser and look for "foliage Vermont" "Autumn Leaves" and so on. But it's like The Grand Canyon or Northern Lights - photos only give you a hint. You really need to see it with your own eyes.
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Old 08-23-2006, 04:18 AM
 
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A significant point Marooned made by Chaz, is elevation and weather in New England This will have some affect on weather even here in Connecticut, although the highest point is only 3200 feet. And also at Burlington VT, being located on Lake Champlain- which does have some affect on the climate of the city.
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Old 08-25-2006, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Maine
21,360 posts, read 25,380,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chaz longue View Post
Fire up your browser and look for "foliage Vermont" "Autumn Leaves" and so on. But it's like The Grand Canyon or Northern Lights - photos only give you a hint. You really need to see it with your own eyes.
Can you see the Northern Lights in New England?

Also: How clean is Lake Champlain these days? And the other lakes and rivers for that matter? I know you wouldn't want to drink it, but can you safely go fishing and eat what you catch?
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Old 08-25-2006, 10:20 PM
 
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Wow! Thanks for all the wonderful information re: the weather in New England. It's really very hard to imagine since I've never lived in it. I suppose I'd just have to try it out! My husband once lived outside of Chicago and is trying to talk me out of New England b/c of the weather but I have this intense focus on the area so we'll see. One last question (maybe I need to post again (?) but I'll give it a shot here) - how is it getting around there as far as driving to work and such? Do you need tire chains?
Thanks again for all of your comments!
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Old 08-26-2006, 06:11 AM
 
439 posts, read 641,603 times
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Marooned

if coming from the deep south, you will have to make weather adjustments. Northern New England is colder then southern New England- so the adjustment in the southern part of the region will be less. Southern New England is in general milder then the Chicago area, With less windchill and cold in the winter. Summers also are less hot because of sea breezes off the nearby Atlantic and gulf of Maine which will drop 'back door cool fronts in the summer'. Good luck! And I hope you make the move here- we are truly friendly.
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