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Thread summary:

Considering moving to Vermont, pros and cons of living in Vermont, overcoming cold feet when moving, seeking advice about moving out of state

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Old 05-11-2012, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Vermont
530 posts, read 1,241,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68vette View Post
The average number of sunny days in Vermont comes out to 157 days per year. The data I found for western Long Island is 213 days per year. Obviously that would mean the remainder would be cloudy days.
The data for western Long Island, which is very close to Manhattan, might be skewed by the horrible pollution that blankets the area!

The very far eastern end of Long Island has very little snow. I once travelled after a blizzard from Queens (27 inches) to Bridgehampton (6 inches). A remarkable difference for an area separated by less than 100 miles, and all of it flat. The ocean really moderates things, but when the clouds come in, they tend to hang around for days.
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Old 05-12-2012, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Winter Springs, FL
1,792 posts, read 4,266,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jenny1951 View Post
The data for western Long Island, which is very close to Manhattan, might be skewed by the horrible pollution that blankets the area!

The very far eastern end of Long Island has very little snow. I once travelled after a blizzard from Queens (27 inches) to Bridgehampton (6 inches). A remarkable difference for an area separated by less than 100 miles, and all of it flat. The ocean really moderates things, but when the clouds come in, they tend to hang around for days.
Many assume cities are highly polluted, but that is dated. In the pat that may have been true but the data and testing point out how things have changed. NYC and other eastern seaboard cities have low pollution levels. NYC and Boston both typically have half the ozone levels Vermont has. The assumption is because the state is so natural, it has clean air and water. The Midwest and the jet steam change that.
Weather or precipitation type could be different, but cloud cover over that geographically small area shouldn't't be that different.
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Old 05-12-2012, 02:08 PM
 
48 posts, read 95,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68vette View Post
Many assume cities are highly polluted, but that is dated. In the pat that may have been true but the data and testing point out how things have changed. NYC and other eastern seaboard cities have low pollution levels. NYC and Boston both typically have half the ozone levels Vermont has. The assumption is because the state is so natural, it has clean air and water. The Midwest and the jet steam change that.
Weather or precipitation type could be different, but cloud cover over that geographically small area shouldn't't be that different.
Are you saying those millions of autos being operated don't have an effect on the air pollution in cities?

What about Interstate Highway corridors?

Take a look at this each day, especially as summer progresses:

AIRNow - Homepage

We're in a easy period right now of not too hot and not too cold. Those graphics start getting really ugly in the summer!
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Old 05-12-2012, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Vermont
530 posts, read 1,241,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68vette View Post
Many assume cities are highly polluted, but that is dated. In the pat that may have been true but the data and testing point out how things have changed. NYC and other eastern seaboard cities have low pollution levels. NYC and Boston both typically have half the ozone levels Vermont has. The assumption is because the state is so natural, it has clean air and water. The Midwest and the jet steam change that.
Weather or precipitation type could be different, but cloud cover over that geographically small area shouldn't't be that different.
I don't know about that. If I go down to the city, there is a constant haze over all the boroughs. It's rare to see a really clear blue sky. I always feel if I can see it, it can't be good. Salt Lake in the winter was like that with the inversion. But maybe what you see isn't harmful? Too many days in the summer where it's recommended that asthmatics and the elderly stay indoors...I never encounter that here, or rarely.
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Old 05-12-2012, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Winter Springs, FL
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I agree 100% that you would think they would have air pollution issues, but there are agencies that measure and track what's in the air. The only logical explanation is these cities are on the coast. The only way pollution will sit over an area is if its trapped. San Fran. is a good example. The mountains keep that thick foggy haze in the bay area.
The asthma point is a very good point as well. We just looked at the data at work and Vermont has a very high asthma rate. In fact we are statistically higher than the US average. This is one reason we are looking at our air quality in Vermont. We were just as surprised what the actual data showed. Most of this info is very easy to find. I don't have the links right now, but it is an eye opener if anyone is interested.
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Old 05-12-2012, 09:30 PM
 
48 posts, read 95,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68vette View Post
I agree 100% that you would think they would have air pollution issues, but there are agencies that measure and track what's in the air. The only logical explanation is these cities are on the coast. The only way pollution will sit over an area is if its trapped. San Fran. is a good example. The mountains keep that thick foggy haze in the bay area.
The asthma point is a very good point as well. We just looked at the data at work and Vermont has a very high asthma rate. In fact we are statistically higher than the US average. This is one reason we are looking at our air quality in Vermont. We were just as surprised what the actual data showed. Most of this info is very easy to find. I don't have the links right now, but it is an eye opener if anyone is interested.
By all means post links to whatever you have. I certainly wouldn't mind reading it.

I wouldn't be surprised to hear that burning wood for heat is one of the main culprits. I've read the air in some of the Alaskan towns are seriously unhealthy during the winter months as a result wood burning.
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Old 05-13-2012, 11:18 AM
 
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Pine forests can be major contributors to air quality problems. IIRC, a lot of the Adirondack forest is pine.

Having been around more than a few years, I remember the smell from the gas plant in Burlington, and the old Moran generating station haze. On the other side of the coin, going down Pine Street past the Maltex plant there were wonderful odors of maple syrup used in the making of Maypo.

By the early 1980s, Burlington was about as clean as it is going to get.

Much as they are an added cost, the catalytic converters and elimination of leaded gasoline were major contributors to cleaning up the air. In most cases, burning wood in the summer isn't an issue.

The coastal city explanation for cleaner air is on target. Much of the year, the differences between land temperature and sea temperature create onshore and offshore breezes. There was a kite business in South Florida that depended on those, and every time I drove by his kites were flying. Burlington sometimes get slight breezes along these lines, but nothing like the coast.
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Old 05-14-2012, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Winter Springs, FL
1,792 posts, read 4,266,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamn View Post
Are you saying those millions of autos being operated don't have an effect on the air pollution in cities?

What about Interstate Highway corridors?

Take a look at this each day, especially as summer progresses:

AIRNow - Homepage

We're in a easy period right now of not too hot and not too cold. Those graphics start getting really ugly in the summer!
I am in complete agreement that summers are worse because of the heat. That does not mean cities are more polluted because of cars. As EPA standards become more and more stringent, car pollution is slowly declining. The times when pollution becomes a big issue in cities is when the air is stagnant. What is on the increase for one are animal based pollution. The U.S. Food and Agriculture Organization predicts a 60 percent increase in agricultural methane output by 2030. Methane is 23 times more potent than carbon dioxide as a contributor to global warming, is produced daily by cows. In fact, agriculture generates about 14 percent of the greenhouse gases today. Then we have to factor in things that cities don't have that produce more pollution than cars, like lawn mowers. Testing has found that operating a typical gasoline mower with a four-cycle engine produced as much pollution as driving a modern car about 95 miles.The pollution generated from cars, trucks, factories, etc. does not just sit over the areas it is generated. Those pollutants travel hundreds of miles. This is why we also have the effect from the Midwest.
The good news is the number of hazardous days each year is declining slowly. The only time New England or the major cities have hazardous days is when the air is stagnant. The haze people see is typically pollution and cities are not only subject to it. There are hot summer days in New England where it's hazy as well (do a Google image search of "hazy pictures of Vermont"). The infamous triple H. from our weather reports. The EPA developed the Air Quality Index, because pollution is not always, or as the EPA states, pollution most of the time is not visible or it doesn't have a smell.
As I mentioned in a previous post, the asthma rate in Vermont is above the national average. There is a reason for that. The information is showing that many of these people were born here or lived in New England since their diagnosis. So we eliminated the possibility that people moved here for cleaner air. Airborne pollution is the leading cause for asthma exacerbation. That had to play a role. Due the jet stream, we on the east coast end up with everyone's emissions west of us.
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Old 05-14-2012, 10:43 AM
 
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I was watching the movie Me, Myseelf, and Irene(the movie), which was filmed mostly in Vermont, and found myself missing the state.
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Old 05-14-2012, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,679 posts, read 3,256,422 times
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I really want to live in Vermont too, I think of Vermont all the time, but at the same time I want a job where I can help blinded veterans and accident survivors to lead more normal lives (rehab of the blind and vision impaired) but there's no job like that in Vermont. So for now, I summer in Vermont, good enough for now I think.
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