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Old 06-19-2009, 06:50 AM
 
6,764 posts, read 22,072,850 times
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Please someone (any one) chime in here.
Do companies and organizations and so forth like to and prefer to hire locals (as in long term Vermonters) over new transplants?

I just got another "We liked your credentials and interview but we went with the other person' call. I have good references (local) from my last job. I am educated, I present myself well.

However, in the last few calls, the hiring person has told me, "It was a tough decision but we went with someone else.'

Has anyone from outside the area (but living here now) found it very hard to get hired? I know it is competitive here and I have heard they like their own over 'newbies' but I have been here almost 2 years... I mean, is it the accent? The attitude? The ''false perception of NYers?" (I have lived in a few places and some people just do not like NYers..). I try to tone it down and not be 'too animated' but I am still wondering what it takes to get a job these days...

I am going to start thinking exit strategy because I am wasting my life here.
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Old 06-19-2009, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Rutland, VT
1,822 posts, read 5,132,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GypsySoul22 View Post
Do companies and organizations and so forth like to and prefer to hire locals (as in long term Vermonters) over new transplants?

Has anyone from outside the area (but living here now) found it very hard to get hired?
I know this has been incredibly tough for you. I'm so sorry about that. I keep hoping you'll be posting that you got a job you're enjoying. I still hold out that hope.

I can only cite my own experience: Like most people, I've applied for many more jobs than I actually got hired for. In the companies and organizations I've actually worked with, I've never noticed a hiring preference for people based on where they're from.
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Old 06-19-2009, 07:05 AM
 
6,764 posts, read 22,072,850 times
Reputation: 4773
Thanks.
Yes, I was shocked when I heard from the hiring person yesterday that "We had such a huge amount of people apply and someone's personality just seemed to stand out over the others.."

It's been a rough time here...the worst place I have ever lived to find a job, though it might change.
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Old 06-19-2009, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Vermont
1,475 posts, read 4,142,736 times
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One thing I've noticed, lots of hiring processes are complete shams. That is, employers already know who they will be hiring. Especially with state and federal jobs, but others as well. The idea of posting all state and federal jobs was a nice idea to ensure that everyone has a shot at the position, however, many of these job openings do nothing but put people through "waste of time and money interviews" and raise their hopes for nothing. Even private companies do the same as they are often required to post positions for various reasons.

I think many of us have walked by the receptionist desk and seen people spiffed up in nice suits, while we knew they had no chance. I felt sorry for them.

The best way to get a job is through knowing someone, unfortunately.
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Old 06-19-2009, 08:44 AM
 
Location: The Woods
18,358 posts, read 26,495,840 times
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It's not unusual for one job posting to get hundreds of applicants. Sometimes even thousands. Sooner or later you might get a job, or, you might not...I think some people will prefer locals (mostly smaller businesses) but they'll never tell you if they do.
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Old 06-19-2009, 08:55 AM
 
6,764 posts, read 22,072,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quickdraw View Post
The best way to get a job is through knowing someone, unfortunately.
So, you think this will get a person the edge?
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Old 06-19-2009, 09:01 AM
 
1,652 posts, read 2,549,838 times
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I can tell you from personal experience as we are trying to fill a few positions here that for every employment ad you post you get hundreds of applicants. And right now you are getting people who are way overqualified and hard to ignore on a credentials basis.

As far as the College and DHMC, it is incredibly hard to get into there unless you have a solid "in." They generally have an internal candidate that is the leader out of the gate and are only posting jobs publicly to fill legal requirements.

Persistence can pay off though, always followup email apps with phone calls and voicemail's, try to make appointments to see people in person. Show them who you are so your personality can win them over.

Good luck.
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Old 06-19-2009, 09:11 AM
 
1,652 posts, read 2,549,838 times
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I will add that right now is possibly the worst time in a generation to be a job seeker. Things seem to be picking up a bit but most companies are just trying to stay busy enough to support the staff they have, very few are growing in these tough economic times.

Not very encouraging, but that's the facts I'm afraid. I wouldn't keep assuming it's "you" or your accent, or some perceived slight against transplants. Things are just really, really tough right now.
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Old 06-19-2009, 10:15 AM
 
23,600 posts, read 70,412,676 times
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I've been on both sides of the employer/employee fence. As an employer, I looked, more or less in order, for:

Basic intelligence - no errors on resume or job app, able to hold a conversation in the interview, especially on subjects related to the job. Some people put college degrees in this category, but I just noted them as mild indicators of perseverance if the degree didn't meet the next category.

Core qualifications - does the person have the previous training required to do the job as it exists and will grow in the future.

Pay expectations - if someone doesn't expect enough, they likely will need more training, if they expect too much they will use the job as a temp position while they look elsewhere. Training (which includes the time it takes a new employee to "fit in") is a major expense and often a PITA.

General appearance - slovenly can't work with the public, too flashy can be a warning sign of other problems and personality issues. Perfumes and colognes never helped and sometimes hindered.

Health - the ADA dictates that employers have to be blind to disabilities that don't have an effect on job performance, but general health and health issues can make a major impact on insurance costs and scheduling folks to "fill in." Anyone with a long illness that doesn't look cured and robust isn't a good candidate.

Stability - this is where "hiring locals" has some effect. If a person has lived in the area for five or more years, the chances of a sudden leave are much less than with someone who has lived in the area for six months. Some jobs need that stability more than others.

Recommendations - this may seem like a "hiring locals" bias, but it isn't. If the above qualifications are met by ten candidates, the one who comes in with a recommendation from a staff member or business associate will have the edge. In some areas, and especially in tight job markets, people have learned to use this as a standard technique, even cultivating friendships to get the edge.

Charisma - some job candidates have personalities that "fit" the position. Tech types tend to being a little retiring and meticulous, sales types somewhat effusive, and so on. This gets put below the other qualifications because it can be easy to fake for an interview, but sometimes you get a feeling that one candidate will "click" while the others will just fill the position. Often this is the determining factor between a group of candidates.

The candidate that comes to an interview having already talked with employees, or having done research on the company and clients, and having a clear understanding of the company goals (both stated and unstated) will often win out. If you plan on working at a place for a few years, spending hours doing background research on it isn't unusual, especially if the job is anything more than a casual "off the street" position.

Staying power - this is a little hard to describe. In the extreme, it is tossing out the apps from people who are unemployed. In the interview, it is the impression that the candidate isn't "needy" but motivated, and will be unavailable soon.

Example: When I was job hunting, the first part of my task was finding and researching the companies, the second part was tailoring the resumes (NOT just the cover letters) to the individual companies and writing the cover letters to the proper person. When I had the best employers lined up and contacts ready to be made, I would do about a dozen at a time. Inevitably, I would have at least three interviews and have to explain to the interviewer that if a position was offered to me, I wouldn't be able to make a positive decision until a certain day, but that any delay beyond a few days in offering the position would likely find me unavailable. However, those were national job searches, so it might not fit in your situation.
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Old 06-19-2009, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Vermont
1,442 posts, read 6,500,225 times
Reputation: 457
GypsySoul, have you considered starting your own business? A lot of out of work professinals are doing that. If you have credentials, basic intelligence, and professional skills that can be offered on a freelance bases, it might be worth your while to consider this, especially if what you offer is an in-demand service.
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