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Old 10-27-2019, 01:59 PM
 
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Where did you get your number for metro Richmond population? Are you checking the correct state?
Richmond’s population is over 1.3 million, nearly double your 700k estimate.
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Old 10-27-2019, 02:06 PM
 
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Akron is comparable to Roanoke, though Roanoke is more cultural and has a better looking downtown.
If Columbus was pretty it would be comparable to Richmond. Sure, Columbus suburbs are much bigger than Richmond’s but the downtown areas are about the same size. Richmond is prettier with better architecture, better cultural institutions and is situated in a prettier and more dynamic natural setting.

I loved my two years in Columbus but I clawed my way back to Virginia.
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Old 10-27-2019, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,509 posts, read 8,456,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer114 View Post
Akron is comparable to Roanoke, though Roanoke is more cultural and has a better looking downtown.
If Columbus was pretty it would be comparable to Richmond. Sure, Columbus suburbs are much bigger than Richmond’s but the downtown areas are about the same size. Richmond is prettier with better architecture, better cultural institutions and is situated in a prettier and more dynamic natural setting.

I loved my two years in Columbus but I clawed my way back to Virginia.
Ok
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Old 10-27-2019, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,509 posts, read 8,456,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer114 View Post
Where did you get your number for metro Richmond population? Are you checking the correct state?
Richmond’s population is over 1.3 million, nearly double your 700k estimate.
I don't know. I was incorrect with that one.
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Old 10-28-2019, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA All Day View Post
Are you referring to size? Speaking only for Rich...no question the midwest cities and metros are bigger...but more suburban sprawl in the midwest seems to be the primary differential (aside from Chicago of course). As I stated in the other thread comparing Rich to the midwest, none of those cities (again excluding Chi) offers anything that clearly places them in a higher tier other than direct flights to more places. I'd say culturally, Rich offers more than most of them as the midwest is very homogeneous in this regard.
I don't know. I guess it depends on what history you're into and what culture you're into. I don't have any preference either way. I'm no historian or anything but I think there's an interesting story everywhere. I'm no more of a fan of Midwestern history than I am a fan of Mid-Atlantic or Southern history. I do think that Virginia makes a bigger deal out of it and capitalizes off of it better than the Midwest does. The only thing I remember from Ohio is the underground railroad and different abolitionists. And of course our industrial history, in particular aviation, glass, rubber and automotive. It isn't colonial though, but I think it's cool.

If something isn't interesting to you, you can't force it. My relatives were fascinated by Jamestown but we never got around to Colonial Williamsburg, for time constraints. I've been here since the late 00s but I have no desire to see it. But I respect what they're trying to do. I would be more interested in how they acquired the land to build Colonial Williamsburg than I would be for the actual purpose.

Chicago does have suburban sprawl. So does Cleveland. But some of the larger Midwestern cities it may not feel like sprawl. You may not know where the city ends and where the suburb begins.

We have some cool museums and historical landmarks. The architectural styles are different from here. And Cleveland has a nice theater district that ranks up there. Columbus has COSI and a zoo that ranks up there. Not to mention our casinos, particularly in Cleveland and Detroit, and our waterfront areas in Chicago, Cleveland and Cincinnati. And of course the sports. And Ohio State. None of that means anything culturally? Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens alone is worth a look.
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Old 10-28-2019, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
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Originally Posted by VA All Day View Post
It does...I'm speaking more on the tendency of midwesterners (mainly Boomer-aged and older white folks) to overstate what's there like we're still in the first half of the 20th century.
Oh. Well that's not my generation I'm in my 40s.

It was a lot better then I guess. The area is still racist so far as I'm concerned. But it is my home. Some things change some stay the same. Cleveland was a very dangerous city. Now not so much but I still wouldn't be caught on the East side at any time of the day. Downtown is cool. Cities like Akron are more what Cleveland was back in the 70s and 80s, which isn't good.

Maybe Cleveland can be Brooklyn in 50 years if they keep up their momentum. They have a long way to go.

To be fair only places worth dealing with in that part of the country is Chicago, Minneapolis, Columbus, Indianapolis. And Columbus and Indianapolis aren't that interesting but they have jobs.
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Old 10-29-2019, 05:33 AM
 
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Just for laughs, there's the Judgmental Map of Virginia. A bit dated now but not terribly far off base.
https://judgmentalmaps.com/tagged/virginia

Bliss2424 - Don't look at that site's map of Kansas City MO. Whoever created that seems to be a very bitter person.
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Old 10-29-2019, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,509 posts, read 8,456,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ersatz View Post
Just for laughs, there's the Judgmental Map of Virginia. A bit dated now but not terribly far off base.
https://judgmentalmaps.com/tagged/virginia

Bliss2424 - Don't look at that site's map of Kansas City MO. Whoever created that seems to be a very bitter person.
Loved it. The map of my hometown was dead on.
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Old 10-29-2019, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Colorado
63 posts, read 53,274 times
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Thank you everyone for the great feedback so far!

So, let me try to summarize your remarks irreverently, as somebody from the Great Plains who has never been to Virginia, just for fun...

A summary of four major urban centers in Virginia from biggest to smallest.

1. NOVA - a suburb of the DC megalopolis which is expensive, congested and pretentious-ish inhabited by rat race obsessed politicians, with everybody trying to out do the next guy.

2. Norfolk/VA Beach - a bunch of people jumbled together in a tangled congested maze of cities who do not like to cooperate together all held together with a sort of silly putty of military bases resulting in a lot of hassle for the price.

3. Richmond - a respectable average-ish city, (It kinda sounds like Omaha Nebraska) not fan-tabulous but not crappy. An overall decent place to live, but may suffer from the worst of both worlds. Too big to be quaint and charming, too small to be an urban hotspot. But cheaper and more cohesive than #2.

4. Roanoke - a medium sized Appalachian mountain town with very pretty scenery occupied by a lot of doctors and urban hillbillies that has struggled to decide on an identity for itself, though it is working on it. It may be hard to find a job and there is no Costco, but you will probably know your neighbors name.

All in good fun ; )

But Goofy328 is right, don't look at the map of KC! Holy Toledo!! It is jaded but weirdly not entirely false.

ok..we have some further information from headquarters. We can now narrow down the possibilities to option #2, #4, or a wildcard option, Portland Maine. We are hoping to come in the next few weeks for a scout of VA.

Any thoughts?
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Old 10-29-2019, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,509 posts, read 8,456,469 times
Reputation: 3822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bliss2424 View Post
Thank you everyone for the great feedback so far!

So, let me try to summarize your remarks irreverently, as somebody from the Great Plains who has never been to Virginia, just for fun...

A summary of four major urban centers in Virginia from biggest to smallest.

1. NOVA - a suburb of the DC megalopolis which is expensive, congested and pretentious-ish inhabited by rat race obsessed politicians, with everybody trying to out do the next guy.

2. Norfolk/VA Beach - a bunch of people jumbled together in a tangled congested maze of cities who do not like to cooperate together all held together with a sort of silly putty of military bases resulting in a lot of hassle for the price.

3. Richmond - a respectable average-ish city, (It kinda sounds like Omaha Nebraska) not fan-tabulous but not crappy. An overall decent place to live, but may suffer from the worst of both worlds. Too big to be quaint and charming, too small to be an urban hotspot. But cheaper and more cohesive than #2.

4. Roanoke - a medium sized Appalachian mountain town with very pretty scenery occupied by a lot of doctors and urban hillbillies that has struggled to decide on an identity for itself, though it is working on it. It may be hard to find a job and there is no Costco, but you will probably know your neighbors name.

All in good fun ; )

But Goofy328 is right, don't look at the map of KC! Holy Toledo!! It is jaded but weirdly not entirely false.

ok..we have some further information from headquarters. We can now narrow down the possibilities to option #2, #4, or a wildcard option, Portland Maine. We are hoping to come in the next few weeks for a scout of VA.

Any thoughts?
Hampton Roads does not have a clear identity. You're probably better off with Roanoke or Richmond, if that is important to you. It is really a matter of taste there is no right or wrong. And that is really the point of Hampton Roads it is the biggest criticism of this area. Sure there are the military bases and the fact of history here with respect to Virginia's origins, but that is not an identity in the modern sense most people are looking for when it comes to a city. That is not going to help you define that city.

Or you can choose Portland Maine. But whatever you do spend some time in different parts of Virginia before ruling it out and see for yourself.

Now what we were talking about the Midwest, in a nutshell, is that they know what they are, and they know what they're not, they know why people love their city and they know why they hate their city. They know what the city is known for. And of course some cities have evolved into something else; the more successful cities have, those not so prosperous are still defined by their industrial age which was a long time ago. Like you can't call Akron the rubber capital now, that is just silly. But 50 years ago that was an accurate assessment. Most of the rubber stuff, these days, is a distant memory. Same with Toledo and glass, same with Cleveland and steel. One thing I've noticed around here is that people either put it in the shadow of DC or in the shadow of NYC. In the Midwest, it isn't really like you're in the shadow of Chicago, even though technically you should be. Akron, Cleveland and Canton are far more collaborative than the cities in Hampton Roads. And the cities in Northeast Ohio do not touch each other. So any comparisons or analogies of Virginia's cities with Midwestern cities need context. People don't care about other cities they do not live in, whereas here in Virginia, or Northern Virginia/DC/Maryland area the cities are all close and people get into that sort of thing.

OP really has to decide if they want to be in a region, or in a city with suburban areas, no matter how large and small, and then determine if everything they want or need is in that city. Virginia has regions. Northern Virginia and Hampton Roads are regions. Richmond, Roanoke, Charlottesville, Harrisonburg, Staunton, Winchester etc are more traditional cities with suburban areas. If making analogies with other parts of the country take it into consideration. Makes more sense to compare Virginia's regions with Minneapolis/St. Paul, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Southern California, Northern NJ etc than it does to compare it to cities like Chicago, Columbus, etc because those are not regions, those are one big _ city anchors a bunch of smaller suburbs. With Virginia it makes sense to find instances where different cities of a similar size anchor each other when making comparisons. When talking about the Midwest one has to keep in mind that one is generally going to be stuck with their decisions, whereas Virginia is a far smaller area and it does not have to be like that. Like people I grew up with never left Northeastern Ohio and are never going to, many never leave their city. I've been to Indianapolis once, but technically it is no different than leaving Norfolk and going to DC. People don't really travel much around the area; they say they will but then it's several hours to drive to the city and they never do it. People don't even want to go from Akron to Cleveland or Dayton to Cincinnati and that's only like 45 minutes, or an hour, respectively. When I was in Dayton I may have went to Columbus like 3 times and that was only an hour and fifteen minutes away. And it wasn't like Dayton was that great or anything it sucked but I always found something to get into.

Last edited by goofy328; 10-29-2019 at 05:16 PM..
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