Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland
 [Register]
Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland Calvert County, Charles County, Montgomery County, and Prince George's County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-11-2011, 10:51 PM
 
449 posts, read 1,175,536 times
Reputation: 223

Advertisements

lol that's my alma mater. Small world.

I attended Pre College by choice at Hampton to get a feel for the school before I officially began. Good times.

I'm not sure if I'll send my kids to PG County public schools if I'm still in this area when I (God willing) have children, but I would definitely only consider a handful of high schools in the county.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-16-2011, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Hyattsville, MD
304 posts, read 713,497 times
Reputation: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Meatkins makes a big deal about the North/South divide in the County but that isn't necessarily true. In just the last 5 years Wise High School, which draws kids from all over Upper Marlboro and in close Beltway communities, and Obama Elementary have been built to the tune of around $200M. Every system in MD has a backlog og maintenance for schools, Anne Arundel is 2 or 3 BILLION behind. Douglass got a new Science wing a few years ago that cost about $6M, which is a shame because the kids there run away from Science.
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatkins View Post
That's why I said south of Pennsylvania Avenue. Wise and Obama are both north of Route 4. Douglass is just one other school besides Suitland Elementary. Do you have anymore? And Upper Marlboro can be argued to be more central than north or south. I'm speaking of schools in Oxon Hill, Fort Washington, Accokeek, Clinton, Suitland, Temple Hills, and Brandywine.

Okay that may be true that there are backlogs in the state but it still doesn't explain the inconsistencies in the way schools are being built. You have argued that the principal deserve the blame but there are two reasons why that doesn't make sense.

a) Principals don't build new schools, the county does. The decisions to build new school buildings in places like Bowie as opposed to Fort Washington or Accokeek make absolutely no sense. Accokeek and Fort Washington has 2 of the 3 worst conditioned buildings in the county and two of the worst in the state and those buildings have been neglected for DECADES!!!! It's so bad that those schools look exactly the same as they did when I went to school and we're talking about 15-20 years ago.

b) If principals are responsible for maintenance being done on buildings and it's not getting done, who fault is that? Yes the principal deserves blame, but he/she also has superiors who make sure that the people who work underneath them do their jobs. If part of your job is to make sure the school buildings are maintained properly and they are not, then who is going to make sure that the job is done? Is the school system just supposed to ignore it? The school system should be trying to uphold an image of putting children first, but yet unproductive support staff in the Sasscer building keep their jobs while the buildings fall apart? Does that really make sense? Do you really need so many administrators and support staff?
In response to all of this... traditionally (and even so today but to a lesser extent) there has been a significantly higher enrollment of students in the northern section of PGC, than in the southern. The schools have also been smaller and are just about as old (if not older). I attended school from 3rd grade until 12th grade, all in the Hyattsville-area. Every single school I went to was severely over the state rated capacity (SRC). My elementary school had 660-students by the time I graduated. It has a SRC of 540-students. We had four temp trailers outside the school. A few years later, that same elementary school housed over 950-students! Capacity only dipped dramatically after the county FINALLY built two new schools (Rosa L. Parks & Marry Harris Jones) and they also removed the 6th grade and relocated it to a feeder middle school. Even so, the enrollment has surged back to about 650-students. There are six trailers outside that same school, today. My younger siblings attended Thomas S. Stone Elementary. Thomas Stone has a SRC of 574-students, but, the school at one time housed almost 1,000-students! This was on-going for several years. Again, the only reason the population finally dropped to below 100% capacity, was because the county finally built Rosa Parks. Moving out of Hyattsville for a second (but to neighboring Bladensburg) one of my brothers attended Blandesburg Elementary in the 90s. Bladensburg ES has a SRC of 691-students but housed over 900-students! Enrollment got so bad at Bladensburg and neighboring Rogers Heights, that the county HAD to build a new school (Port Towns Elementary). Only then did enrollment fall below SRC.

All of the other elementary schools in the immediate Hyattsville area, are busting out of their seems. Ridgecrest ES was finally given a 200-student addition, a few years ago. Before that, they were well over 100% SRC. University Park ES is currently at 111% SRC. Rosa Parks ES is at 102% SRC and it was just opened in 2006! Parks has four temp trailers on its premises. Over-capacity in the Hyattsville area (alone) is so bad that the county is in the final stages of approving plans for yet ANOTHER brand new elementary school that will be located on the site of Nicholas Orem Middle School and if they can ever find the funding, it should be completed by the 2013-14 school year. The only schools in the Hyattsville-area that aren't overcrowded, are the two middle schools.

Northwestern High School was built in 2000. The original building dated back to 1951. There was a lot of contention between Northwestern and Bowie High Schools because elitist Bowie couldn't understand how Northwestern was getting a new building, before them. Well, looking at the situation now, it was evident. Northwestern was the largest high school in Maryland until Henry A. Wise was built. Northwestern has a SRC of 2,700-students but their largest population was over 3,000-students around 2007/08. They had 19 temp trailers out back. Again, this is a brand new school built to preempt this very issue. Even after the school board realigned the boundaries and sent over 200 students to High Point HS, it still didn't make much of a difference.

And, again, this is just the Hyattsville area schools. Eleanor Roosevelt is at 123% capacity. Yes, you can blame it on their Science & Tech magnet, but that school has always been busting out of its seems. Roosevelt had almost 3,200 students at its peak. It was only designed for 2,100 students. Parkdale HS just received a 600-student addition. They are still over-capacity. Laurel HS just received a 600-student addition. Before, they had to send several hundred students next door to the site of a former elementary school because there was no way to house them in the main facility. That was in addition to there being several temp trailers on the main campus. Bladensburg HS was way over-capacity and to the point that a slight breeze was about to knock it over. They really needed a new building. The story goes on and on. Both the northern and southern areas of the county need new buildings, but unfortunately, the need was/is much greater in the northern area.

You mentioned the Suitland area. What about it? Suitland HS isn't exactly a POS. And, they have a much newer wing that houses the schools Technical Academy program. Forestville HS is a relatively nice facility and it's just down the street from Suitland. Suitland Elementary is brand new. Oxon Hill/Temple Hills... they DO need a new school. Where's the money going to come from, though? The school system is literally writing IOUs to everyone, right now. There's no money for anything. Teachers are being laid off ... administrators are being laid off ... the magnet program expansion has been on hold for God knows how long because there is no money to expand it as it was supposed to be ... the schools are even operating on a four-day week during summer break, with Friday being a total shutdown day. There's no money for a $90-100 million Oxon Hill High School. Fort Washington has Potomac High School and they just received a brand new 400-student addition. They aren't in dire need. Accokeek/Clinton/Brandywine... yeah, the schools in those areas aren't brand new but there isn't a significant need to replace them due to age or over-capacity issues, like there is for schools such as Bowie High or Oxon Hill High or the northern tier of the county. Crossland is operating at 73% capacity ... Douglas at 88% capacity ... Gwynn Park at 91% capacity ... Potomac at a whopping 58% capacity! ... Surrattsville is at 67% capacity ... and even Oxon Hill is only at 89% capacity. Compare that to Bowie which is at 109% SRC ... Roosevelt at 123% SRC ... High Point and Laurel at 100% SRC ... and Parkdale at 102% SRC. You have your answer.

Finally, to those asking why the Prince George's County Public Schools system is so bad... there's no easy answer, but the biggest blame goes to administration (i.e. the school board, superintendent, and principals + their administration) to inadequate teachers to lackadaisical parents who just don't care. All of these things trickle down to the students. I can speak this as I currently am a part of a non-profit organization at a PG County school which supports a program at the school. I see and hear the frustration from the few effective teachers and parents. I work with a parent who was the president of the schools' PTA. He said he never saw more than 10 parents at any given meeting. This is a school with a population of well-over 2,000. The administration is incompetent. You have people who are best served as a vice principals being promoted to principalships and they clearly don't belong there. That can't even run their own households let alone a large school. Teachers who are more like Mrs. Krubappel and Ms. Hover from 'The Simpsons'. And worst off, you have an upper-level administration and schoolboard who are in denial and don't want to admit the system is f-ed up. Dr. Hite is a joke. He never states that the school system is in dismay. Hear him tell it, PG County outclasses, outperforms, and rivals Montgomery County schools. I really wish Dr. John Deasy had stayed. I think he would have been the best thing for PG County schools in modern history. I am just saddened by all the potential waiting for a place to be unleashed but can't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 12:03 PM
 
Location: DMV
10,125 posts, read 13,979,004 times
Reputation: 3222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khemistry View Post
In response to all of this... traditionally (and even so today but to a lesser extent) there has been a significantly higher enrollment of students in the northern section of PGC, than in the southern. The schools have also been smaller and are just about as old (if not older). I attended school from 3rd grade until 12th grade, all in the Hyattsville-area. Every single school I went to was severely over the state rated capacity (SRC). My elementary school had 660-students by the time I graduated. It has a SRC of 540-students. We had four temp trailers outside the school. A few years later, that same elementary school housed over 950-students! Capacity only dipped dramatically after the county FINALLY built two new schools (Rosa L. Parks & Marry Harris Jones) and they also removed the 6th grade and relocated it to a feeder middle school. Even so, the enrollment has surged back to about 650-students. There are six trailers outside that same school, today. My younger siblings attended Thomas S. Stone Elementary. Thomas Stone has a SRC of 574-students, but, the school at one time housed almost 1,000-students! This was on-going for several years. Again, the only reason the population finally dropped to below 100% capacity, was because the county finally built Rosa Parks. Moving out of Hyattsville for a second (but to neighboring Bladensburg) one of my brothers attended Blandesburg Elementary in the 90s. Bladensburg ES has a SRC of 691-students but housed over 900-students! Enrollment got so bad at Bladensburg and neighboring Rogers Heights, that the county HAD to build a new school (Port Towns Elementary). Only then did enrollment fall below SRC.

All of the other elementary schools in the immediate Hyattsville area, are busting out of their seems. Ridgecrest ES was finally given a 200-student addition, a few years ago. Before that, they were well over 100% SRC. University Park ES is currently at 111% SRC. Rosa Parks ES is at 102% SRC and it was just opened in 2006! Parks has four temp trailers on its premises. Over-capacity in the Hyattsville area (alone) is so bad that the county is in the final stages of approving plans for yet ANOTHER brand new elementary school that will be located on the site of Nicholas Orem Middle School and if they can ever find the funding, it should be completed by the 2013-14 school year. The only schools in the Hyattsville-area that aren't overcrowded, are the two middle schools.

Northwestern High School was built in 2000. The original building dated back to 1951. There was a lot of contention between Northwestern and Bowie High Schools because elitist Bowie couldn't understand how Northwestern was getting a new building, before them. Well, looking at the situation now, it was evident. Northwestern was the largest high school in Maryland until Henry A. Wise was built. Northwestern has a SRC of 2,700-students but their largest population was over 3,000-students around 2007/08. They had 19 temp trailers out back. Again, this is a brand new school built to preempt this very issue. Even after the school board realigned the boundaries and sent over 200 students to High Point HS, it still didn't make much of a difference.

And, again, this is just the Hyattsville area schools. Eleanor Roosevelt is at 123% capacity. Yes, you can blame it on their Science & Tech magnet, but that school has always been busting out of its seems. Roosevelt had almost 3,200 students at its peak. It was only designed for 2,100 students. Parkdale HS just received a 600-student addition. They are still over-capacity. Laurel HS just received a 600-student addition. Before, they had to send several hundred students next door to the site of a former elementary school because there was no way to house them in the main facility. That was in addition to there being several temp trailers on the main campus. Bladensburg HS was way over-capacity and to the point that a slight breeze was about to knock it over. They really needed a new building. The story goes on and on. Both the northern and southern areas of the county need new buildings, but unfortunately, the need was/is much greater in the northern area.

You mentioned the Suitland area. What about it? Suitland HS isn't exactly a POS. And, they have a much newer wing that houses the schools Technical Academy program. Forestville HS is a relatively nice facility and it's just down the street from Suitland. Suitland Elementary is brand new. Oxon Hill/Temple Hills... they DO need a new school. Where's the money going to come from, though? The school system is literally writing IOUs to everyone, right now. There's no money for anything. Teachers are being laid off ... administrators are being laid off ... the magnet program expansion has been on hold for God knows how long because there is no money to expand it as it was supposed to be ... the schools are even operating on a four-day week during summer break, with Friday being a total shutdown day. There's no money for a $90-100 million Oxon Hill High School. Fort Washington has Potomac High School and they just received a brand new 400-student addition. They aren't in dire need. Accokeek/Clinton/Brandywine... yeah, the schools in those areas aren't brand new but there isn't a significant need to replace them due to age or over-capacity issues, like there is for schools such as Bowie High or Oxon Hill High or the northern tier of the county. Crossland is operating at 73% capacity ... Douglas at 88% capacity ... Gwynn Park at 91% capacity ... Potomac at a whopping 58% capacity! ... Surrattsville is at 67% capacity ... and even Oxon Hill is only at 89% capacity. Compare that to Bowie which is at 109% SRC ... Roosevelt at 123% SRC ... High Point and Laurel at 100% SRC ... and Parkdale at 102% SRC. You have your answer.

Finally, to those asking why the Prince George's County Public Schools system is so bad... there's no easy answer, but the biggest blame goes to administration (i.e. the school board, superintendent, and principals + their administration) to inadequate teachers to lackadaisical parents who just don't care. All of these things trickle down to the students. I can speak this as I currently am a part of a non-profit organization at a PG County school which supports a program at the school. I see and hear the frustration from the few effective teachers and parents. I work with a parent who was the president of the schools' PTA. He said he never saw more than 10 parents at any given meeting. This is a school with a population of well-over 2,000. The administration is incompetent. You have people who are best served as a vice principals being promoted to principalships and they clearly don't belong there. That can't even run their own households let alone a large school. Teachers who are more like Mrs. Krubappel and Ms. Hover from 'The Simpsons'. And worst off, you have an upper-level administration and schoolboard who are in denial and don't want to admit the system is f-ed up. Dr. Hite is a joke. He never states that the school system is in dismay. Hear him tell it, PG County outclasses, outperforms, and rivals Montgomery County schools. I really wish Dr. John Deasy had stayed. I think he would have been the best thing for PG County schools in modern history. I am just saddened by all the potential waiting for a place to be unleashed but can't.
I agree with a lot of what you said but did you read the article I posted? It clearly states that accokeek and fort washington have 2 schools that are in the worst condition in the county. Your statement of the schools being in fair condition is highly inaccurate. I would encourage you visit some of the schools yourself to confirm this. Your statistics are dated and do not reflect the current state of the southern county. According to the most recent census, the southern part of the county has grown exponentially. Simply put there are a lot of schools down here who are overcrowed as well. It's not just a regional thing it's a county thing. I also know gwynn park is not at 91% capacity because it had 6 trailers when I was in high school about 10 years ago. That was before brandywine got developed. As a matter of fact brandywine, the county council just passed legislation to cap housing development in brandywine. Ask yourself, why would they do that if the area wasn't overpopulated?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Hyattsville, MD
304 posts, read 713,497 times
Reputation: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatkins View Post
I agree with a lot of what you said but did you read the article I posted? It clearly states that accokeek and fort washington have 2 schools that are in the worst condition in the county. Your statement of the schools being in fair condition is highly inaccurate. I would encourage you visit some of the schools yourself to confirm this. Your statistics are dated and do not reflect the current state of the southern county. According to the most recent census, the southern part of the county has grown exponentially. Simply put there are a lot of schools down here who are overcrowed as well. It's not just a regional thing it's a county thing. I also know gwynn park is not at 91% capacity because it had 6 trailers when I was in high school about 10 years ago. That was before brandywine got developed. As a matter of fact brandywine, the county council just passed legislation to cap housing development in brandywine. Ask yourself, why would they do that if the area wasn't overpopulated?
If my information is outdated, you need to take the issue up with PGCPS, considering the information I stated to you was written from their most recent SY2010-11 Official Enrollment Report that is public record and available on their website.

With that being said... when you're dealing with a county with as many issues as PG, you have to pick and choose your battles. Do we replace a school that's really dated/old? Do we replace a school which is severely overcrowded? Or do we replace a school with both issues? On top of that, if said school has any type of special programs (i.e. magnets) that will definitely give them the edge. I can assure you that if ANY school is replaced or supplemented with another facility, Oxon Hill and Bowie High Schools are at the top of that list. Both of those schools have officially been promised new facilities in the past, but it hasn't come to fruition due to budget woes. Going to Bowie HS right quick, Bowie serves over 3,000 students in a building designed for less than 2,000 students. Bowie removed their entire freshman class to an annex building which is located a few miles up the road. Even with this measure, according to the official PGCPS enrollment report, Bowie is still at 109% capacity. I can assure you that overcrowding issues will take precedence over going to school in a crappy building. Look at the schools in DC. Many of them are close to 100 years old and still ticking. If they can put up with students going to schools in aging infrastructures such as that, nobody is going to feel too bad about PG County students having to do the same.

Last edited by Khemistry; 07-17-2011 at 03:32 PM.. Reason: Typo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 08:51 PM
 
Location: DMV
10,125 posts, read 13,979,004 times
Reputation: 3222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khemistry View Post
If my information is outdated, you need to take the issue up with PGCPS, considering the information I stated to you was written from their most recent SY2010-11 Official Enrollment Report that is public record and available on their website.

With that being said... when you're dealing with a county with as many issues as PG, you have to pick and choose your battles. Do we replace a school that's really dated/old? Do we replace a school which is severely overcrowded? Or do we replace a school with both issues? On top of that, if said school has any type of special programs (i.e. magnets) that will definitely give them the edge. I can assure you that if ANY school is replaced or supplemented with another facility, Oxon Hill and Bowie High Schools are at the top of that list. Both of those schools have officially been promised new facilities in the past, but it hasn't come to fruition due to budget woes. Going to Bowie HS right quick, Bowie serves over 3,000 students in a building designed for less than 2,000 students. Bowie removed their entire freshman class to an annex building which is located a few miles up the road. Even with this measure, according to the official PGCPS enrollment report, Bowie is still at 109% capacity. I can assure you that overcrowding issues will take precedence over going to school in a crappy building. Look at the schools in DC. Many of them are close to 100 years old and still ticking. If they can put up with students going to schools in aging infrastructures such as that, nobody is going to feel too bad about PG County students having to do the same.
I see where you are talking about. I am kind of curious how they came up with those numbers but even still, check this out, according to them here goes some southern school stats.

Fort Washington

Friendly High - 99%
Apple Grove Elementary - 100%
Potomac Landing Elementary - 97%
Fort Foote Elementary - 93%

Oxon Hill

Oxon Hill Elementary - 99%

Upper Marlboro
James Madison Middle - 104%

Brandywine
Brandywine Elementary - 104%

Clearly there are areas in great need of schools, ESPECIALLY Fort Washington. Fort Washington hasn't had a new school built since I've been alive, so I'll just put like this, it's been a while.

I would wonder even with these numbers, what kind of resources are being sent to these schools. For instance, what's the teacher to student/ratio at these schools? Do they include transfers? I also notice that there was a lack of information for the academies and a few schools. Places like Accokeek, Andrew Jackson, and Samuel Massie (which I admit is another newer school building) don't have available information.

You definitely have to wonder if equal resources are being passed along. For instance, Whitehall Elementary which is usually about one of the top 3 best elementary schools in the county as far as performance on tests. They have a capacity of 109%. So clearly there is something that is being done different that allow these students to perform at a much higher level than other kids in this county that have similar or even less capacity. That's why I believe these numbers don't tell the whole story.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 09:05 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
45,323 posts, read 60,500,026 times
Reputation: 60911
The State won't even think of allowing a new school to be built until capacity hits 120% for three years running. By allowing I mean the State, through the Board of Public Works consisting of the Governor, Comptroller and MD Secretary of State, approving state funding for the school construction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Hyattsville, MD
304 posts, read 713,497 times
Reputation: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatkins View Post
I see where you are talking about. I am kind of curious how they came up with those numbers but even still, check this out, according to them here goes some southern school stats.

Fort Washington

Friendly High - 99%
Apple Grove Elementary - 100%
Potomac Landing Elementary - 97%
Fort Foote Elementary - 93%

Oxon Hill

Oxon Hill Elementary - 99%

Upper Marlboro
James Madison Middle - 104%

Brandywine
Brandywine Elementary - 104%

Clearly there are areas in great need of schools, ESPECIALLY Fort Washington. Fort Washington hasn't had a new school built since I've been alive, so I'll just put like this, it's been a while.

I would wonder even with these numbers, what kind of resources are being sent to these schools. For instance, what's the teacher to student/ratio at these schools? Do they include transfers? I also notice that there was a lack of information for the academies and a few schools. Places like Accokeek, Andrew Jackson, and Samuel Massie (which I admit is another newer school building) don't have available information.

You definitely have to wonder if equal resources are being passed along. For instance, Whitehall Elementary which is usually about one of the top 3 best elementary schools in the county as far as performance on tests. They have a capacity of 109%. So clearly there is something that is being done different that allow these students to perform at a much higher level than other kids in this county that have similar or even less capacity. That's why I believe these numbers don't tell the whole story.
Isn't Whitehall in Bowie? I hate to be the one bringing race into the mix... but i'm sure it can't be argued that Whitehall's socioeconomic situation and demographics greatly effects performance. Bowie HS is usually considered #2 (at least in the past) only to Roosevelt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 10:08 PM
 
Location: PG Co
21 posts, read 94,547 times
Reputation: 26
I wouldn't say that the schools in PG County are bad, they are just left behind.
For a year of high school I went to a Montgomery County high school and then in 2001 I moved to PG/Beltsville, and attended a high school here in PG. There certainly were several differences. Basically PG schools are behind Montgomery County. I know that some classes are taken in different grades, such as History and Science. I remember a Science/Bio teacher in PG said that they didn't teach at the same level in a Mont. Co high school. PG County schools are given a lower level course to follow.
I graduated fine, but I think it's just assumption that the entire PG area is looked down upon but it really isn't about the entire school, it's about what the individual student does in their success.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2011, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Hyattsville, MD
304 posts, read 713,497 times
Reputation: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by 84red View Post
I wouldn't say that the schools in PG County are bad, they are just left behind.
For a year of high school I went to a Montgomery County high school and then in 2001 I moved to PG/Beltsville, and attended a high school here in PG. There certainly were several differences. Basically PG schools are behind Montgomery County. I know that some classes are taken in different grades, such as History and Science. I remember a Science/Bio teacher in PG said that they didn't teach at the same level in a Mont. Co high school. PG County schools are given a lower level course to follow.
I graduated fine, but I think it's just assumption that the entire PG area is looked down upon but it really isn't about the entire school, it's about what the individual student does in their success.
That's definitely correct. PG County schools have a GREATLY watered down curriculum, as opposed to MoCo. And a lot of the similar courses are taught at different grade levels. But, it also depends on the school you attend. Not all schools offer the same courses. It's about whether or not the school has the staff numbers to support offering more courses; whether or not there's adequate space in the school to accommodate the expanded classes; and whether there's teachers qualified to teach said courses. My high school had a pretty big course selection... one of the biggest in the county. Even still, those courses aren't taught on the same level as MoCo except for perhaps the Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2011, 06:01 AM
 
Location: DMV
10,125 posts, read 13,979,004 times
Reputation: 3222
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khemistry View Post
Isn't Whitehall in Bowie? I hate to be the one bringing race into the mix... but i'm sure it can't be argued that Whitehall's socioeconomic situation and demographics greatly effects performance. Bowie HS is usually considered #2 (at least in the past) only to Roosevelt.
This goes back to my original point. PG purposely caters to certain schools. As long as that continues then the school system as a whole will never flourish. Sure, kids who live in more stable home environments tend to perform better, but that is not always a guarantee every time and it especially isn't when you go to an overcrowded school. To me there is something that they are doing at Whitehall, that may not be obvious to the average observer like us, that allows Whitehall to perform at a high level. As much money comes out of that neighborhood, there are also schools in places like Mitchellville that do not stack up to Whitehall or Tulip Grove. Are black kids really performing this poorly? (rhetorical question)

BTW, to go back to your original post, Potomac High School is in Oxon Hill not Fort Washington. Friendly is the high school in Fort Washington.

And on a side note, according to school digger website, PG County just passed Baltimore City for the worst school system in the state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top