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Old 02-01-2012, 03:51 PM
 
70 posts, read 188,857 times
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Around D.C area, everyone seems to be a professional.

Does it mean that someone is employed but doesn't want to be more specific than that?

I guess it sounds better than I am an associate, I mean, an employee.

*****
A: I am a young professional...

B: You mean you've got a job?
*****
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Old 02-01-2012, 04:30 PM
 
Location: DMV
10,136 posts, read 12,868,815 times
Reputation: 3188
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2rock View Post
Around D.C area, everyone seems to be a professional.

Does it mean that someone is employed but doesn't want to be more specific than that?

I guess it sounds better than I am an associate, I mean, an employee.

*****
A: I am a young professional...

B: You mean you've got a job?
*****
I would assume the word professional is dealing with the more career-oriented worker. Just because you have a job doesn't necessarily mean much. I think the emphasis shows people that you have a stable career and that you aren't going to be going from job to job, field to field. You have a field that you work in and you're sticking to it.

Here goes a definition that I think describes how people often use the word in that context nowadays.

Profession - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary
Quote:
a calling requiring specialized knowledge and often long and intensive academic preparation
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Old 02-01-2012, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
12,419 posts, read 23,484,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meatkins View Post
I would assume the word professional is dealing with the more career-oriented worker.
I think it means you wear a tie to work if you are a man, and some such equivalant if you are a woman.
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Old 02-01-2012, 08:16 PM
 
Location: DMV
10,136 posts, read 12,868,815 times
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Originally Posted by goldenage1 View Post
I think it means you wear a tie to work if you are a man, and some such equivalant if you are a woman.
I don't wear a tie to work, never have and I'm a professional (in the IT field). I don't see how a tie determines how professional someone is. Some fields don't require you to dress up in that manner (IT, some engineering, teachers, scientist, nursing, etc.), but it can still be professional.
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Old 02-02-2012, 07:38 AM
 
70 posts, read 188,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meatkins View Post
I would assume the word professional is dealing with the more career-oriented worker. Just because you have a job doesn't necessarily mean much. I think the emphasis shows people that you have a stable career and that you aren't going to be going from job to job, field to field. You have a field that you work in and you're sticking to it.

Here goes a definition that I think describes how people often use the word in that context nowadays.

Profession - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary
OK. A stable employment.

And some specialized knowledge. I guess every job requires some specialized knowledge but if it's something anybody could learn within a week or a month, then it's not specialized knowledge.

No wonder almost everyone is a professional.
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Old 02-02-2012, 07:39 AM
 
70 posts, read 188,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenage1 View Post
I think it means you wear a tie to work if you are a man, and some such equivalant if you are a woman.
OK. Appearance is important.
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Old 02-02-2012, 07:51 AM
 
70 posts, read 188,857 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatkins View Post
I don't wear a tie to work, never have and I'm a professional (in the IT field). I don't see how a tie determines how professional someone is. Some fields don't require you to dress up in that manner (IT, some engineering, teachers, scientist, nursing, etc.), but it can still be professional.
If you wear a tie in IT field, you are not a professional!!!

I guess standard professional appearance is different for each field.
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Old 02-02-2012, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
12,419 posts, read 23,484,318 times
Reputation: 6041
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2rock View Post
If you wear a tie in IT field, you are not a professional!!!

I guess standard professional appearance is different for each field.
Yeah, you are a manager! (I am a retired IT professional.)
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Old 02-04-2012, 05:29 PM
 
795 posts, read 1,163,588 times
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I'm in IT and I wear a tie to work when I feel like it... maybe once or twice a week... and almost everytime we have meetings with people from "outside" my dept.

I can't stand those IT people who walk around looking like crap... or what I call unprofessional. lol

It does depend on what I'm doing... running reports all day, tie day... working on a project that requires moving something or might get me on the floor, jeans day.

It works for me...

But if someone said they were a "professional" I'd take that as they did not really want to speak to me. lol... can't say anyone has ever said that. Although, I've heard others talk about other people like that when they did not know what the person did for a living... but figured they were a "professional" at something.
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Old 02-05-2012, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
9,396 posts, read 14,868,243 times
Reputation: 6256
I always thought a professional is just someone who gets paid for their job.

Honestly if someone told me their job was "a professional" I'd assume they're either a boring ******* who doesn't wanna make conversation or they work for the CIA.
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